bg

Supervisor Frank P. Petrone News

News Archives


Town Welcomes Panera Bread to Huntington Village


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/18/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, joined by Town Clerk Jo-Ann Raia, County Legis. Dr. William Spencer and Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan A. Berland and Mark Mayoka, welcomed the newest Panera Bread to Huntington Village, which opened on Monday March 18. Located at 345 W. Main St., the store is Panera's 23rd bakery-cafe on Long Island. Supervisor Petrone, Council Members Cuthbertson, Berland and Mayoka, Town Clerk Raia and Legis. Spencer participated in a special bread-breaking ceremony with Ed Doherty, the franchisee, and Greg George, Vice President of Operations for Doherty Enterprises.


 


Petrone Addresses Long Island Commercial Real Estate Expo


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/18/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petone recently delivered the opening remarks at the Long Island Commercial Real Estate Expo (LICREE). The theme of the expo, held at the Huntington Hilton, centered on lessons the real estate and construction industries learned from the aftereffects of Hurricane Sandy. Supervisor Petrone, in kicking off the expo, spoke of the need to engage a broad network of public, private and not-for-profit groups in emergency planning and in implementing measures to mitigate the effects of a similar storm. The Supervisor also spoke of the need, as part of those mitigation measures, to seriously consider burying utility lines. Supervisor Petrone is pictured here with Michele Michael, LICREE concept creator; Mark Neuwirt, LICREE producer and president, Expos Your Business; and Lyle Sclair, LICREE content developer.


 


Teen Poets to be Recognized by Huntington Town Board


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/12/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
On Wednesday, April 24th the Huntington Town Board will recognize teen poets from the community selected for participation in the Town’s Poetry for the HART Public Art Initiative. The event will begin at 7 p.m. at the Walt Whitman Birthplace (246 Old Walt Whitman Rd., West Hills). The winning teen poets will receive certificates in an award ceremony with members of the Huntington Town Board. Immediately following conclusion of the award ceremony there will be a poetry reading led by adult poet mentor Mahogany L. Browne at which each of the teen poets selected for the program will read their winning poems. After the reading there will be a brief reception honoring the teen poets. The award ceremony, reading, and reception are free and open to the public. Browne – a Fellow of The Poets House and Cave Canem – is the author of several books, including Swag and #Dear Twitter: Love Letters Hashed Out On-line. She has released five LPs including the live album Sheroshima. As co-founder of the Off Broadway poetry production, Jam On It, and co-producer of NYC’s 1st Performance Poetry Festival: SoundBites Poetry Festival, she bridges the gap between lyrical poets and literary emcee. Browne has toured Germany, Amsterdam, England, Canada and recently Australia as one-third of the cultural arts exchange project “Global Poetics.” Her journalism work has been published in magazines Uptown, KING, XXL, The Source, Canada's The Word and UK's MOBO. Her poetry has been published in the literary journals Pluck, Literary Bohemian, Bestiary Brown Girl Love, Muzzle and Up The Staircase. She is an Urban Word NYC mentor, as seen on HBO’s Brave New Voices and facilitates performance poetry and writing workshops throughout the country. She is the publisher of Penmanship Books, a small press for performance artists and owns PoetCD.Com, an on-line marketing and distribution company for poets. She is also the Nuyorican Poets Café Poetry Program Director and curator of their famous Friday Night Slam. Poetry for the HART is a Public Art Initiative project developed by the Town’s Public Art Advisory Committee in conjunction with Teenspeak, Co-Lead Agency, who suggested the project to the Town. Teens in the community from ages 14-18 were invited last fall to submit poems for consideration in the program. This spring a selection panel comprised of poets Robert J. Savino (West Islip), Paula Camacho (Farmingdale) and Gladys Henderson (Nesconset), as well as Public Art Advisory Committee member Deborah Robbins (Huntington Station), reviewed the 293 different submissions from 261 different teen poets and narrowed the choices to the winning poems. Additional partners in this project included Heckscher Museum of Art; Huntington Arts Council; The Long Islander, which has pledged to publish the winning poems; REACH CYA; Town of Huntington Youth Bureau; Tri-Community Youth Agency; the award reception host – Walt Whitman Birthplace Association; and Youth Directions & Alternatives CYA, as well as numerous area teachers who actively encouraged their students’ participation. Subsequent to the ceremonies, colorful placards, each bearing a winning poem, will be placed in the interior advertising spaces on buses throughout the HART system. The names of the winning teen poets and text of their winning poems will be available following the April 24th event. For further information on Poetry for the HART or other Town of Huntington Public Art Initiative projects, contact John Coraor, Director of Cultural Affairs, at 631-351-3099 or via e-mail: jcoraor@HuntingtonNY.gov.

 


Board Approves Amnesty on Overdue Parking Tickets


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/6/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its March 5 meeting, voted to declare a one-month amnesty on overdue traffic summonses, allowing people to settle their accounts by paying 60 percent of the value of their fines and penalties. The amnesty, which will be in effect from April 1 to April 30, targets the approximately $625,000 in outstanding fines and penalties motorists incurred dating back to January 1, 2005 and includes all tickets for which persons were to have replied to the Town's Parking Violations Bureau. "This program will bring revenue to the Town while affording vehicle owners the opportunity to lift an obligation that has been weighing on them, in some cases for up to eight years," said Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, who sponsored the Town Board resolution establishing the amnesty program. "I hope the financial incentive of a 40 percent reduction in the amount they owe will spur them to help clear up their books and ours." The resolution also approved the hiring of Fundamental Business Service Inc. to administer the program for the Town, including mailing notices to persons with outstanding tickets informing them of the one-month amnesty window. The company, which is based in Hempstead, has successfully administered amnesty programs in Babylon, Brookhaven and Islip. On May 1, after the one-month amnesty ends, persons who did not take advantage of the amnesty will owe the full amount in fines and penalties and risk other enforcement measures including the possibility of their car being "booted" or a lien being filed for the arrears. In other action, the Town Board: -- authorized the Town to participate as one of 30 municipal partners in the "New York Solar Smart" application for a federal Solar Rooftop Challenge Grant being submitted by the City University of New York. -- authorized the Supervisor to enter into a contract with North Star Concrete Construction Corp. for renovations to the American Legion Hall on Woodside Avenue in Northport. The Town, the Village of Northport and American Legion Post 694 are pooling separate federal grants to fund the rehabilitation and modernization of the building. The cost of the project is $997,987. -- Accepted donations of park benches at two Town facilities, one in memory of Dennis Michael Edwards at the Halesite Marina Park and the other in memory of Patricia Dowling at Crab Meadow Beach. In each case, the donations come from their families.

 


Women's History Month Program Focuses on Victorian-Era NYC


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/28/2013

 

...


 



 


TOWN HALL CLOSED ON FEBRUARY 18


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/15/2013

 
Town Hall will be closed on Monday, February 18, 2013 in observance of President's Day.

 


Speech, Musical Performances Mark Town’s 26th Annual Black History Month Celebration


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/15/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

div>  
An inspiring speech by a local county legislator and stirring musical performances by a Walt Whitman High School sophomore and local church groups marked Huntington’s 26th Annual Black History Month Celebration on Thursday, February 7. Dr. William Spencer, who represents the 18th District in the Suffolk County Legislature, emphasized in the keynote address the importance of education in achieving success and of helping people by being a good neighbor. Dr. Spencer noted that a half century ago, at the height of the civil rights movement, education was viewed as a priority in the path to success; today, he noted, only 18 percent of African-Americans have a college degree. “We, the People, need to re-dedicate ourselves to education,” he said. Highlighting the musical performances was the impressive rendition of the Negro National Anthem sung by Kalif Omari Jones. Fifteen-year-old Kalif, a sophomore at Walt Whitman High School, is a member of the New York City Collegiate Chorale who has performed at Carnegie Hall, with the Metropolitan Opera and on HBO. Musical selections were also performed by Peggie Primm and Will Floyd from the Feed the People Ministry and the Voices of Faith Missionary Youth Choir under the direction of Minister Timothy Flythe. The Huntington Outreach Ministry, under the direction of the Rev. Jerry Artis and Pastor Bernadette Watkins, did a theatrical performance. The invocation and benediction were delivered by the Rev. Larry Washington of the Evergreen Missionary Baptist Church. Huntington Supervisor Frank. P. Petrone gave welcoming remarks to the audience at Jack Abrams Intermediate School. The members of the Town Council also spoke.


 


PROGRAM CANCELLATIONS FOR FEBRUARY 11


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/11/2013

 
Because the Elwood School distirct is closed, the Parks and Recreation Department's adult education classes held in the Elwood schools are cancelled today. Programs at Coindre Hall are also cancelled today Also cancelled is the 1 p.m. line dance program at the Senior Center.

 


TOWN HALL CLOSED ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/11/2013

 
Town Hall will be closed on Tuesday, February 12, in observance of Lincoln's Birthday.

 


PETRONE URGES RESIDENTS TO STAY OFF ROADS


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/9/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone today announced that all roads in the Town are officially closed and urged residents to stay home today. This is the text of the telephone message he sent out via the Huntington Alert system: This is Supervisor Frank Petrone with a Huntington Alert message. Roads in the Town are treacherous. As we all dig out from last night's blizzard, it is vital for your safety and the safety of others that you stay home today. Roads must remain clear so emergency vehicles can get through and unnecessary traffic will compromise their ability to do so. Keeping off the roads will also allow snow-clearing crews to do their jobs without interference. All roads in the Town are officially closed. HART bus is not operating today. All activities at Town facilities have been canceled. If your power is out, you should call the LIPA hotline at 1-800-490-0075. If a tree is blocking a road, call the Highway Hotline at 499-0444. For Town-related emergencies, call the Public Safety Department at 271-2157 or 271-6573. Town employees are working with outside contractors to clear roads and get us back to normal as quickly as possible. Crews will be clearing through tomorrow. But do not think that because your street is cleared, that means it is safe to venture out. Even if your street has been cleared, that does not mean the next street over is passable. Enjoy the day at home with your family. Be careful, be safe and be warm. Thank you.

 


PETRONE DECLARES SNOW EMERGENCY


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/8/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
In advance of the blizzard predicted to hit the area starting tonight, Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone declared an official snow emergency, effective at 2 p.m., and announced the cancellation of events scheduled for tonight and tomorrow at Town facilities. Supervisor Petrone also opened the Town’s Emergency Operations Center at 2 p.m. to help coordinate communications among Town departments and fire and rescue services. Representatives from several Town departments with key emergency responsibilities were told to report to the Center, in the Town's general services facility on Pulaski Road in Huntington Station. “The Town has been preparing for this storm for several days, and I hope that all residents have been, too,” Supervisor Petrone said. “With predictions of high winds and heavy now, the best place for residents is in their homes. At the same time, residents should feel confident that the Town is working hard to make roads passable and provide necessary services." Supervisor Petrone urged residents to stay off the roads and get cars off the street to make plowing more successful and to allow for emergency vehicle access. Under a snow emergency, the Supervisor has the power to close roads, appropriate necessary equipment from all sources and make necessary purchases without following the usual procedures. The declaration also makes available to the Highway Department Town equipment and personnel to assist Highway Department crews. Among the programs cancelled are tonight’s DJ Night at the Dix Hills Ice Rink as well as tomorrow morning’s group skating lessons and the afternoon public skating sessions. Also cancelled are creative arts programs at Lahey Elementary School, Southdown Elementary School, Silas Wood School and Signal Hill School; Saturday recreation programs for the developmentally disabled at Maplewood School; and the Friday night Pickle Ball program at Coindre Hall. The Coindre Hall Gym will be closed on Friday and Saturday. The Recycling Center on New York Avenue will be closed on Saturday. HART Bus paratransit service will not operate tomorrow, Saturday February 9. Scheduled HART bus service is suspended until noon on Saturday. A decision about whether service will resume in the afternoon will be made in the morning. Persons who want to report a downed tree blocking a road should call the Highway Hotline at 499-0444. For emergencies, call the Public Safety Department at 271-2157 or 271-6573. Supervisor Petrone advised residents to check the Town’s website, http://huntingtonny.gov, the Town’s Facebook page or government access channels 18 (Cablevision) and 38 (FIOS) for updates.

 


Huntington Board Enacts Moratorium on Wind Turbines


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/6/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its February 5 meeting, approved a 128-day moratorium on the processing of applications and the issuance of permits for the construction of wind turbines. The moratorium will allow time for the Town to craft regulations regarding zoning, use, location, size, height, noise and safety requirements. Sponsored by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, the resolution establishes a procedure similar to the one followed on 2011, when the Town enacted major revisions to the Town Code affecting cellular telephone towers. Currently, the Town has no regulations specifically pertaining to wind turbines. However, with the wind turbine industry experiencing rapid growth, and with applications for turbines pending or anticipated, the Board saw the need to explore whether procedures specific to wind turbines should be included in the Town Code. The moratorium holds existing applications in abeyance allows while the Board considers the issue. The Town Board vote followed a public hearing earlier in the evening at which several speakers made suggestions about factors the Town Board could consider in promulgating the new regulations. In other action, the Town Board: -- denied, for a second time, issuance of a certificate of approval in a historic district that would have allowed construction of a three-bay automobile repair shop at 114 Prime Ave., in the Mill Lane Historic District. The vote immediately followed a public hearing at which residents expressed concerns that the repair shop would be out of character with the district and create noise and traffic problems. The Town Board originally denied the application last year, but a State Supreme Court justice ordered the Town to reconsider the application after the original denial was challenged in court. -- approved creation of a Hurricane Sandy Emergency Review Task Force. The task force will assess the Town’s preparation and response to Hurricane Sandy and make recommendations about changes that should be made as the Town plans for the next storm. The task force is to report its findings to Supervisor Frank P. Petrone by May 1. -- approved creation of a Melville Plan Advisory Committee to oversee the issuance of a request for proposals to select a project consultant to prepare a Melville integrated land use, circulation and infrastructure plan and to oversee the development of the plan. Appointed to the committee were David Pennetta, Oxford & Simpson Realty; Mark Hamer, Harvest Real Estate Services; James T. Coschignano, Melville Fire District; Michael DeLuise, Melville Chamber of Commerce; Alissa Sue Taff, Sweet Hollow Civic Association; Mitchell Pally, MTA; Frank Pusinelli, RXR Realty; Geoffrey Rick, NYS Department of Transportation; Michael Pascucci, WLNY-TV; Paul Tonna, Energia Partnership; Seymour Liebman, Canon USA; and Anthony Manetta, Suffolk County IDA. -- authorized a $57,900 contract with GEI Consultants of Huntington Station to conduct a comprehensive hydrology study of the Crab Meadow Watershed and to draft a Stewardship Plan that will help maintain and enhance the environmental quality of the system. The plan will be created with public input and by working with the Crab Meadow Watershed Citizens Advisory committee. -- authorized a contract with Granicus Inc. to help manage, organize and index video that is made available on the Town’s website and on its government access television channels. -- declared May 18-24 as Town of Huntington Safe Boating Week. The Town has been working with the Greater Huntington Council of Yacht and Boating Clubs on programs for the week.

 


Petrone Unveils Curbside E-Waste Recycling Program


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/5/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Town Supervisor Frank P. Petrone announced today that residents can now call the Town for curbside pick-up of their electronic waste (e-waste). Supervisor Petrone was joined by Town Board members, Town Environmental Waste Management staff as well as Lloyd Harbor resident and environmental advocate, Jeff Bartels. According to the Department of Environmental Conservation, industry experts estimate that U.S. consumers throw away 400 million units of electronic equipment per year. Recycling electronic waste protects human health and the environment by diverting thousands of pounds of waste from landfills and incinerators. It also keeps toxins such as lead, mercury and cadmium from contaminating the air, water and soil, and, e-waste recycling conserves natural resources by allowing valuable materials to be reclaimed and reused. Prior to the launch of Supervisor Petrone’s e-waste curbside pick-up program, residents were encouraged to bring their electronic waste to the Town’s Recycling Center at 641 New York Avenue in Huntington between the hours of 8am to 4pm, Tuesday through Saturday. Those who prefer to dispose of e-waste at the Recycling Center in this way may continue to do so. However, the new curbside pickup service is intended to encourage higher volume and more widespread disposal of e-waste in the most convenient way possible. “In 2012, residents disposed of 330,000 pounds of e-waste at our Recycling Center, Supervisor Petrone stated. “I believe with our new curbside pickup program that number can boost dramatically in 2013 and beyond.” Electronic waste includes computers (including laptops, desktops, tablets and e-readers), televisions, cathode ray tubes, small scale servers, computer peripherals, monitors, keyboards, mice or pointing devices, fax machines, document scanners, printers, VCRs, digital video recorders, portable digital music players, DVD players, digital converter boxes, cable or satellite receivers, electronic or video game consoles, etc. “By calling 351-3239, residents can make arrangements for specific day pick up of their e-waste, as well as receive detailed instructions on how to erase the contents of their computer hard drive, or remove them altogether, to help guard against identify theft,” Supervisor Petrone said. The Town’s proactive stance in the proper and convenient disposal of e-waste puts Huntington two years ahead of schedule. Beginning January 1, 2015, New York State law will prohibit consumers from disposing covered electronic equipment in landfills or waste to energy facilities.


 


DeLuise Named to EDC Board


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/25/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone announces the addition of Dix Hills public relations executive Michael B. DeLuise to the board of the Town of Huntington Economic Development Corporation. “Mike brings to the board extensive expertise in the public relations field that will help the EDC increase its visibility and awareness of its projects, as well as deep roots in the Huntington business community that will help the EDC achieve its goals,” Supervisor Petrone said. “We welcome Mike to the EDC board and look forward to his contributions,” said Rob Ripp, EDC board chairman. A graduate of New York University, DeLuise was president of a Manhattan-based marketing and advertising firm whose clients included the New York Philharmonic, Radio City Music Hall, American Museum of Natural History, John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, KOOL Jazz Festival, WBLS Radio, Pacifica Radio, Pro-Arte Records, Saratoga County Promotion, and numerous theatrical productions including the Broadway production of MUMMENSCHANZ and David Merrick's 42ND STREET. DeLuise then spent 23 years in college public relations, mostly at Hofstra University but also at New York Institute of Technology and Dowling College. DeLuise founded and is president of the Melville Chamber of Commerce, one of Long Island’s fastest growing business groups, and co-chair of the Huntington Station Action NOW Coalition’s public awareness committee. He has also served as vice president of the Vanderbilt Museum board, president of the Long Island Advertising Club, chair of the Long Island Convention and Visitors Bureau and a member of the board of directors of Friends of Long Island Heritage. He has been recognized by the Public Relations Professionals of Long Island with their Lifetime Achievement Award and was named 2012 Person of the Year by the Long Islander Newspapers. The Town of Huntington Economic Development Corporation (EDC) is a not-for-profit corporation that was established by the Huntington Town Board in 2003 to foster economic development and business opportunities throughout the Town. At present the EDC’s nine-member volunteer board of directors is working on numerous revitalization projects in Huntington Station to improve its public infrastructure and cultivate downtown redevelopment. DeLuise’s election as a director came at the EDC’s January meeting and is effective immediately.

 


Huntington Acquires Fort Salonga Parcel


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/25/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Town of Huntington took title recently to a one-acre piece of property in Fort Salonga that will be used to protect natural open space and to provide a small gravel parking area to enable safe access to the northern trailhead to the Makamah Nature Preserve across the street. The Town paid the Roberg family $350,000 for the parcel, which is located just north of the intersection of Makamah and Breeze Hill Roads. The narrow road width, winding road alignment, and fast speed of cars on Makamah Road had made parking along the western road edge dangerous and contributed to erosion of the road bank in close proximity of freshwater wetlands. Purchase of the parcel will allow the Town to address both situations. “The Town has been working for some time to acquire this property, both for its environmental significance and for how the Town can now make it easier and safer for residents to access the Makamah Nature Preserve trail,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “I appreciate the Roberg family’s patience in working with us throughout the acquisition process.” The Fort Salonga Association supported the Town acquisition, which was funded through the Huntington Environmental Open Space and Park Fund Program. The parcel lies within the Crab Meadow Watershed Area, a region that drains toward Long Island Sound. A hydrology study and stewardship plan for the Crab Meadow Watershed are about to be initiated with grant support from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. The acquired property, which will be named the Davis Brickmaker Preserve, was once used to mine brick molding sand and was critical to the operation of historic brickworks in the area. Molding sand was used to line forms for bricks. In the heyday of the brickmaking operation, workers would transport the sand by wheelbarrows to the end of Makamah Road. The old pilings of the brickworks still remain along the frontage of the Town’s Geisslers Beach. Bruce Roberg, who as trustee handled the sale of his mother’s property, informed Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone at the January 17 closing that he had only recently learned that it was always his grandmother’s wish that a portion of the property should go to the Town. The family once owned 80 acres that stretched from Breeze Hill Road to NYS Route 25A. The acquisition process has been a lengthy one, since the parcel had to be split from a larger parcel through the County Health Department subdivision process. Supervisor Petrone thanked Mr. Roberg for his patience in working with the Town to enable purchase of the property for the benefit of Huntington residents. Local wildlife, such as deer, turkey, fox, opossums and raccoons, will benefit as well. The Roberg site is the 31st parcel acquired under the Town EOSPA Program. A total of 240 acres has been purchased and protected since the Town’s first EOSPA acquisition in 1999. Several acquisitions are pending and will close this year, having been authorized and funded by the Town Board already. Included will be the 12.4-acre Carpenter Farm in Huntington, 8-acre Meyers Farm in Melville and 5-acre Erb Property in Dix Hills.


 


Berland’s Youth Council Hosts Sixth Annual “Youth Forum”


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/24/2013
Author: Allison Jones

 
Huntington, NY – Over 50 local high school students attended the Huntington Youth Council’s sixth annual “Youth Forum” Tuesday evening, sponsored by Councilwoman Susan A. Berland. Students from all nine public high schools in the Town of Huntington were invited to participate in a Town Hall meeting held exclusively for high school students and run by high school students. The Huntington Youth Council selected topics for the “Youth Forum” due to their potential impact on the youth of our community as well as their national relevance. The topics were: legalization of marijuana, sex education in public schools and lowering the drinking age. Members of the Huntington Youth Council worked within committees to research and write summaries on each topic for the agenda. After the Councilwoman welcomed the students, the League of Women Voters of Huntington’s Co-President Judie Gorenstein emphasized the importance of getting involved in the democratic process at an early age. Shortly thereafter, participants broke into small group discussions led by the Executive Board of the Huntington Youth Council to familiarize themselves with the issues prior to the public hearings. Huntington Youth Council Co-Supervisors Grant Berland and Jesse Feldman-Stein and Deputy Supervisor Dylan Wadler led discussions on each of the three topics as well as the open portion in which students were invited to share their opinions on issues not included in the agenda. Deputy Supervisor of Events Rachel Anszelowicz, Deputy Supervisor of Membership Philip Giambertone, Deputy Supervisor of Publications Annie Nikunen, Deputy Supervisor of Communications Spencer Young, Town Clerk Bianca Mielke and Deputy Town Clerk Tristan Hynes assisted from the dais. Over 30 students testified in these discussions. “I am pleased that so many students chose to attend the Huntington Youth Council’s sixth annual ‘Youth Forum’ to testify on the issues that concern them,” commented Councilwoman Berland. “The “Youth Forum” gives young people the opportunity to communicate with their peers on the Huntington Youth Council on issues pertinent to their well-being. I would like to thank the League of Women Voters of Huntington and its Co-Presidents, Judie Gorenstein and Brenda Reiss, for attending this evening and for their constant support of the goals of the Huntington Youth Council. I would also like to thank the students in the Council. Their dedication to empowering their peers is commendable. Lastly, thank you to the various levels of school administrators who encouraged their students to attend the forum.” For more information on the Huntington Youth Council, please call Councilwoman Berland’s legislative aide, Allison Jones, at 351-3018.


 


Cuthbertson to Seniors: Reminder to Apply for Your Senior STAR Exemption


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/24/2013
Author: Steven Jimemez

 
I would like to take this opportunity to remind our Seniors who reside in the Town of Huntington and who will be 65-years of age or older by December 31, 2013 that you may be eligible for a Senior Tax Exemption on your December 2013 tax bill (if you do not already have one). The deadline to file is March 1st, 2013 in the Town Assessor’s Office. There are two programs that may qualify you for a tax reduction. The first is the Enhanced STAR school tax exemption, which is about double the savings of Basic STAR and is primarily funded by New York State. The requirements are: 1) All owners must be 65 years of age by December 31, 2013 (except husband and wife or sibling co-owners; only one needs to be 65). 2) Your 2011 income cannot exceed $79,050 (Federal Adjusted Gross less taxable IRA distributions). 3) You will need to file an application with the Town Assessor’s Office by March 1st, 2013. The second is a limited income Senior Citizen exemption that can also reduce School, County, Police, Town, Highway and Library tax, but your 2012 income cannot exceed $37,400. As a Councilman, I have always voted for the maximum savings for this Senior exemption. Should you have any questions or to pick up an application, please contact the Assessor’s Office at 631-351-3226 or visit the Town’s website at: www.HuntingtonNY.gov . MARK CUTHBERTSON Councilman

 


Councilwoman Berland Welcomes Theta Healing Arts to the Town of Huntington


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/23/2013
Author: Allison Jones

 
Huntington, NY – Councilwoman Susan A. Berland was on hand with Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce representatives for the official ribbon cutting of Theta Healing Arts last Tuesday evening. Theta Healing Arts, located at 205 East Main Street, was founded by Joanne Ferdman, a clinical hypnotist and holistic health enthusiast, as a natural choice for total healing and self-discovery. Theta Healing Arts assists clients in developing strategies to overcome physical, mental or emotional challenges, enhance their inner strength and achieve success in their lives by using tools and treatments tailored for each individual. “It was a pleasure for me to welcome Theta Healing Arts to the Town of Huntington,” commented Councilwoman Berland. “Living a healthy lifestyle goes beyond eating right and exercising. It is also important to cater to your mental and emotional needs as well. Theta Healing Arts has designed programs to make that endeavor as easy as possible for their clients and an atmosphere that is welcoming and warm. I wish them much success.”


 


2012 Tulip Festival Winners Recognized


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/22/2013
Author: Kristen Gaumont

 
Huntington, NY, January 8, 2013 - Councilman Mark Cuthbertson and the Huntington Town Board, and Astoria Federal Savings, which is the Chief Sponsor of the Huntington Tulip Festival, were proud to recognize the winners of the 2012 Tulip Festival Photo Contest at the January 8th town board meeting. First place and a $150 award check went to Richard Dolce of NY, NY for his photo, "Tulip #2." Second place and the $100 prize was awarded to Wendy Aull of South Huntington, NY for "Admiring the Tulips" and third place and the $50 prize was awarded to Dianne Selles of Huntington, NY for "Untitled." Honorable Mention went to Rachel Meyerowitz of Merrick, NY for “Tulip Twist” and to Andrea Gordon of Northport, NY for “Up Close and Colorful.” Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, who initiated the Huntington Tulip Festival over a decade ago stated, “My congratulations to all of the winners of the 2012 Tulip Festival Photo Contest. Over the years, we have seen many different artistic interpretations of the festival captured in photographs, with vivid tulips always taking center stage. These photos serve as a reminder that spring and warmer days are right around the corner.” The Huntington Tulip Festival is a FREE, family-oriented festival featuring thousands of tulips, booths with activities for children and live entertainment sponsored by the Town of Huntington and Chief Sponsor, Astoria Federal Savings. This year's festival will take place on Sunday, May 5, 2013 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Huntington's Heckscher Park. The 2013 tulip festival photo contest is open to any photographer, amateur or professional. All entries must be un-mounted, 8" X 10" photographic color prints. A maximum of two entries per photographer will be accepted. To be eligible, all entries must be postmarked or received by July 31, 2013. Additional information and entry forms can be obtained by calling (631) 351-3099 or by going to the Town of Huntington's website at http://HuntingtonNY.gov Click "online library" and then go to "cultural affairs" and then "tulip festival photo contest entry form."


 


Town Sponsors Diabetes Prevention Seminar


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/22/2013

 

....



 


Town Board Sets Hearing for Moratorium on Wind Turbines


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/9/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its first meeting of 2013, set a February 5 public hearing for a 90-day moratorium on issuing permits for wind turbines, allowing time for the Town to craft regulations regarding zoning, use, location, size, height, noise and safety requirements. Sponsored by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, the resolution calling for the hearing establishes a procedure similar to the one followed on 2011, when the Town enacted major revisions to the Town Code affecting cellular telephone towers. Currently, the Town has no regulations specifically pertaining to wind turbines. However, with the wind turbine industry experiencing rapid growth, and with applications for turbines pending or anticipated, the Board saw the need to explore whether procedures specific to wind turbines should be included in the Town Code. The moratorium holds existing applications in abeyance allows while the Board considers the issue. The hearing will be held at 7 p.m. In other action, the Board: -- appointed Cindy Elan-Mangano as Town Attorney and Joan Cergol as Community Development Director. Elan-Mangano has been an Assistant Town Attorney since 2002, concentrating on prosecuting violations of Town Code in Suffolk County District Court. Prior to that, she spent 16 years in the Bronx District Attorney’s Office, where her duties included prosecuting homicide and other major offense cases and supervising and training junior assistant district attorneys. A Melville resident, she is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and Pace University School of Law. Cergol has also worked for the Town since 2002 as Supervisor Frank P. Petrone’s Economic Development Assistant and liaison to the business community.. She also serves as executive director of the Town of Huntington Economic Development Corp. Previously, she worked in marketing and public relations in both the public and private sector. A Huntington resident, she holds a degree in broadcast journalism and public relations from the C.W. Post Center of Long island University. -- approved execution of a contract not to exceed $111,900 with Amma Construction for the reconstruction of a bulkhead at Sea Spray Drive in Centerport. The Town’s drainage system collects runoff from Sea Spray Drive and outfalls to Northport Harbor through a pipe and headwall system that, after more than 40 years of use, has collapsed, causing erosion to the shoreline. This project will address damage caused by the collapsed headwall. -- authorized a compensation agreement for Randy J. Schaeffer, whom District Court Judge C. Stephen Hackeling appointed as temporary receiver for the property at 8 Judith Drive, Greenlawn, easing the cleanup of conditions that prompted the Town to place the property on the blighted properties list. -- scheduled a public hearing for February 5 to reconsider an application to allow construction of a three-bay service station at 114 Prime Avenue, Huntington, located in the Mill Lane Historic District. The Town Board denied the application last year, but was ordered by a State Supreme Court justice to reconsider the application after the Town’s action was challenged in court. -- approved the 2013 Public Art Plan, outlining ongoing and proposed projects to be advanced this year.

 


Residents Urged to Complete On-Line Parking Survey


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/4/2013
Author: A.J. Carter

 
A deadline is fast approaching for people to participate in an on-line survey on parking in Huntington Village, a key component of a study aimed at identifying the most effective and cost appropriate solutions to common and nagging parking issues in the village. The survey, which participants can access through the home page of the Town’s website, http://huntingtonny.gov, or at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/HuntingtonVillage, is being conducted by the New York City firm Nelson Nygaard, which in July was retained by a consortium that includes the Town, Town of Huntington Economic Development Corp., the Huntington Village Business Improvement District, the Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce and The Paramount Theater to conduct the study. Residents will have until the end of this month to participate in the survey, whose findings will be central to two meetings scheduled for next month to obtain additional input. “This is the Town’s chance to hear from you, and all those who are most closely connected to parking conditions in the Village: its business owners, local employees, residents, shoppers, visitors, and anybody who frequents the village for its business, cultural and recreational activities,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “The survey only takes a few minutes of your time, and will help us as we explore options to address this important issue.” As part of this study, the Town will be forming two stakeholder groups. The first will consist of Huntington Village business/property owners, and the second will be made up of residents most closely affected by Huntington Village’s parking demand. Each group will consist of 8-12 persons. Anyone interested in being considered for the resident stakeholder group should email Joan Cergol at jcergol@HuntingtonNY.gov with their address and telephone number as soon as possible. The Town is seeking to finalize the stakeholder groups by the end of January so Nelson Nygaard can meet with each group on Monday February 4th. Additionally, the Town of Huntington Economic Development Corporation will devote its Monday, February 4th, 2013 meeting at Huntington Town Hall (in Room 114 at 7p.m). to the subject of parking in Huntington Village. At the meeting, Nelson Nygaard will provide an update of their findings and residents will have an opportunity to contribute input. Finally, on Tuesday, February 26th the Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce will provide an update and hear input on the parking study at its networking breakfast at the Huntington Yacht Club. Networking begins at 7:30 am. The breakfast and program will run from 8–10 am. Fee is $25 for members and $30 for non-members. To register for this event contact Ellen O’Brien at the Chamber at (631) 421-6100 or register directly from the Huntington Chamber’s website.

 


TOWN HALL CLOSED ON JANUARY 1


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/31/2012

 
Town Hall will be closed on Tuesday January 1, 2013 in observance of the New year's holiday.

 


TOWN HALL CLOSED ON DEC. 24 AND 25


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/24/2012

 
Town Hall will be closed on Dec. 24 (Christmas Eve) and December 25 (Christmas Day).

 


Councilwoman Susan A. Berland Hosted a “Holiday Skate” for Huntington’s Veterans and First Responders at Dix Hills Ice Rink


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/21/2012
Author: Allison Jones

 
Huntington, NY – Dozens of happy families, veterans and first responders whizzed around the ice Wednesday evening at the “Holiday Skate for Veterans and First Responders” hosted by Councilwoman Susan A. Berland. Attendees were treated to free admission, skate rentals and hot cocoa at the special skate session. Members of the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 2207 Band played holiday tunes while over ___ Huntington residents merrily skated around the ice. The eight-member brass ensemble has been performing for five years at Coast Guard ceremonial events and at public events such as at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum site, community parades and at concerts for hospitalized veterans on Long Island. “The holiday season is the perfect time to offer a heartfelt thank you and some winter fun to our veterans and first responders,” commented Councilwoman Berland. “I thoroughly enjoyed spending the evening with Huntington’s selfless residents who have served and continue to serve us every day and I hope they enjoyed the ice! I would like to thank D & J for providing the hot chocolate.”


 


Councilwoman Berland and Legislator Stern Honor “Sunshine’s Toy Drive’s”


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/21/2012
Author: Allison Jones

 
Huntington, NY – Councilwoman Susan A. Berland and Suffolk County Legislator Steve Stern were on hand to present official proclamations to S & D Transfer of Cranbury, New Jersey and Valrico Ventures of Nederland, Texas at the 6th Annual “Sunshine’s Toy Drive” at the Dix Hills Fire Department on Saturday, December 15. Both S & D Transfer and Valrico Ventures donated $10,000 each which saved the toy drive this year in light of Hurricane Sandy. Valrico Ventures got word of the toy drive via Huntington Manor Fire Commissioner Mike Pastore and passed the information on to their business partner S & D Transfer. This union was a perfect case of being in the “right place at the right time” as preparations for this year’s toy drive faced a significant roadblock due to Hurricane Sandy. “Given the advent of Hurricane Sandy, the annual “Sunshine’s Toy Drive” would not have been able to occur without the donations of these two companies,” commented Councilwoman Berland. “It was an honor to present Cindy Perez of Valrico Ventures and Ed McLaughlin of S & D Transfer with official proclamations from the Town of Huntington. Their charitable donation ensured a happy holiday season for families affected by Hurricane Sandy. I thank Victoria, Hope and Mike Plumitallo for sponsoring this Toy Drive year after year.” “I thank Cindy Perez, VP of Valrico Ventures, Vyki Alleman, Ed McLaughlin, Owner S&D Transfer, Dave Tarvick, and Michael Duffy, Esq., for their generous donations to ‘Sunshine’s Toy Drive.’ Their kindness will enable many families affected by Superstorm Sandy to celebrate the holiday season,” Legislator Stern said. “Victoria Plumitallo started ‘Sunshine’s Toy Drive’ when she was still in elementary school and her thoughtfulness and dedication made today’s events possible. I congratulate her and her family for their incredible efforts to spread sunshine this year and every year.”


 


Cuthbertson Inspects Fleets Cove Road Drainage Project


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/21/2012
Author: Steven Jimemez

 
Town Councilman Mark Cuthbertson inspecting drainage improvements along Fleets Cove Road in Centerport. The improvements, made possible by a New York State matching grant, will greatly reduce pesticides and nitrates from entering local waters, and is part of the Town’s ongoing efforts to clean-up our harbors and bays.


 


Town Board Acts on a Variety of Measures


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/19/2012

 
Huntington, NY – After a moment of silence in memory of the 26 children and adults murdered at a Newtown, Connecticut elementary school, the Huntington Town Board concluded its meeting schedule for 2013 by acting on a wide variety of measures Tuesday December 18. At the meeting, the Board: -- authorized execution of a contract of sale and appropriated funding to acquire approximately five acres of the former Park Avenue Dairy property at the corner of Park Avenue and Woodhull Road in Huntington. The property, an important historic site, is a key trailhead link in the planned Huntington Heritage Trail. -- authorized Supervisor Frank P. Petrone to enter into a memorandum of understanding with Covanta Huntington LLP to explore the feasibility of expanding the metal recovery system at the Resource Recovery Facility to include non-ferrous metals. Covanta, which runs the plant, already collects ferrous metals from the waste stream and sells them, with the Town receiving 90 percent of the revenue. -- approved the Heckscher Museum’s proposed sale by public auction of native American artifacts and a ceremonial cannon and the long-term loan of the Town’s mineral collection held by the museum to Stony Brook University’s Department of Geosciences. The artifacts and mineral collection have been in storage for decades and are not part of the museum’s core mission. -- approved establishment of a memorial garden, including a small statue, inside the fenced playground at Heckscher Park as a memorial to Victoria Gaines, one of three children killed in a July 4, 2012 boating accident. Costs associated with the statue, plantings and walkway will be donated by the Gaines family; the Town will assist with the installation of the statue and plantings. -- named the environmental center at the Fuchs Pond preserve in Northport as the Cranberry Hill Environmental Center, in recognition of the original name Rudolph Reimer gave the estate when he developed the property in 1927. Reiner later served from 1934 to 1940 as the federal Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization. -- approved settlement of a lawsuit with Huntington Hospital over charges for the hospital’s use of the Huntington Sewer System and execution of a contract with the hospital over future charges. -- approved fare increases for the HART bus system. -- set a public hearing for January 8, 2013 to consider acquiring two parcels as additions to Gateway Park. -- set a public hearing for 7 p.m. on February 5, 2013 to hear comments and suggestions on the Town’s response to Hurricane Sandy.

 


HART Route and Schedule Changes Finalized


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/14/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Area Rapid Transit (HART), the only Town-operated bus system on Long Island, has finalized the first significant route and schedule changes since it began operating in 1978. The new routes, which take effect Jan 2, 2013, incorporate suggestions raised at two public information sessions after the changes were first proposed, as well as in letters, e-mails and comment forms left on the buses. “The format of the public sessions was extremely successful,” Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “It afforded the HART passengers an opportunity to sit and discuss the proposed routes with HART employees and representatives from my office. Based on the information gained from these discussions and the numerous letters, e-mails and comment forms, the project team reviewed the proposed plan and made adjustments so that the new schedules will best serve current and future riders.” The changes will replace the existing three routes with four new routes, adding 20.5 miles to the system. Buses will run more frequently than under current schedules. The changes will offer better direct service with less need to transfer between buses to complete trips. The Town hopes that these changes will encourage more people to use HART, the only Town-operated bus system on Long Island. The final plan differs from the original proposal in that it not only restores bus service to Cold Spring Harbor but increases the frequency of that service. Bus service has also been restored to Centerport and Northport Harbor. Under the new schedules, the H-10, H-20 and H-30 routes will operate every 45 minutes and the H-40 every 60 minutes. Bus schedules and a bus system map can be accessed on the Town of Huntington website at http://huntingtonny.gov/permit_pics/1463.pdf

 


Cuthbertson Announces Increased Effort to Enforce Illegal Handicapped and Fire Zone Parking


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/14/2012
Author: Steven Jimemez

 
Councilman Mark Cuthbertson recently announced an elevated Code Enforcement Effort – corresponding to the busy holiday shopping season, that is focusing on illegally parked vehicles in handicapped parking stalls or areas marked as fire zones. Councilman Cuthbertson was joined by the Town’s Department of Public Safety and volunteer members of the Town’s Handicapped Parking Enforcement Program to warn the public about the costly and possible harmful consequences that can result from parking in one these restricted areas. “The holidays are a busy time of the year, and those who have a New York State Disability Parking permit are the only ones permitted to utilize the specially marked stalls,” stated Councilman Mark Cuthbertson. “However, with the hustle and bustle of the holiday shopping season, those without the proper State disability parking plaque will at times opt to occupy the special parking privilege reserved for those who need it the most, or park illegally in a marked fire zone area,” added Cuthbertson. Fines for those who choose to park illegally in a marked fire zone or handicapped parking stall will result in either a $200 or $230 summons respectively for a first offence. When it comes to handicapped parking, it is important to be mindful of the people who truly rely on those spaces. “They are not reserved for lazy people but rather for those who genuinely need to be close and benefit from a shorter walking distance. Without the convenience of disabled parking, many people would be forced to either stay at home or face the danger of having to cover a distance that is further than they are physically capable of doing,” said Cuthbertson. Parking illegally in a marked fire zone will also have negative and in some cases, disastrous implications. “These areas are sensitive parking areas and they are putting others at additional risk by obstructing an area reserved for first responders to stage, or park, at a useful distance from an emergency. Vehicles parked illegally in fire lanes also impede exit areas designed to ease evacuations, making it more difficult, if not impossible. Many of the emergency exits will open into the fire lane for rapid dispersal of patrons from within,” added Cuthbertson. Those who have questions or would like to request a New York State Disability Parking permit application can contact the Town’s Handicapped Services Department at 351-3232.


 


Huntington to Complete First Round of Debris Pickup


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/14/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Town of Huntington Highway Department will complete its first round of picking up Hurricane Sandy debris from the 785 miles of Town roads this weekend (December 15-16), after which it will begin a second and final pass through the Town to collect storm-related material. Once a Highway Department or contractor’s truck has been down a road the second time, debris will be picked up by a resident’s trash hauler. Debris set out for collection by trash haulers must conform to standards for pick up: limbs less than six inches in diameter and four feet in length, bundled and tied, or in cans or bags weighing less than 50 pounds. All residents should be aware that this debris will be manually loaded by refuse workers into the truck, so it is important for worker safety not to exceed the 50 pound weight limit per bag or bundle of brush. Additionally, piles of debris and large tree limbs cannot be collected by garbage trucks To date, the Town has picked up more than 330,000 cubic yards of vegetative storm debris.

 


Council Members Join in Annual Menorah Lighting


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/12/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Town Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan A. Berland and Eugene Cook hold traditional filled donuts as they join Rabbi Asher Vaisfiche of Chabad of Huntington for the annual Menorah lighting ceremony at Huntington Town Hall on Tuesday December 11. Before participating in the lighting ceremony – each Council member lit a candle – the Council members listened to Rabbi Waisfiche deliver a brief talk explaining the meaning of the Jewish holiday of Chanukah, the significance the Menorah plays in the holiday and its symbolism for our current lives. Donuts are a traditional part of the holiday because of the oil used in their production, representing the single day’s worth of oil that burned for eight days in the menorah used to rededicate the Holy Temple after it was retaken from the Syrians by the Maccabees more than 2000 years ago.


 


Cuthbertson Testifies Before NY State’s Moreland Commission


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/12/2012
Author: Steven Jimemez

 
A severe lack of concise and timely communication from the Long Island Power Authority leadership was a leading contributing factor to the delayed and woefully inadequate response to restoration efforts following the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, Huntington Councilman Mark Cuthbertson told a New York State commission earlier this week. Appearing on behalf of the Town of Huntington before The Moreland Commission, Councilman Cuthbertson also testified that LIPA failed to learn any lessons from Tropical Irene one year earlier and the authority’s lack of willingness to work closely and cooperatively with all local municipalities must be scrutinized and changed immediately. “Throughout the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, I had discussions with numerous Huntington residents and local business owners,” Councilman Cuthbertson said. “I thought it was important to share their stories and concerns with members of the Moreland Commission and state our case for the record.” With a limit of two minutes to speak, Councilman Cuthbertson urged the commission to investigate four primary areas of concern: Realistic assessments of damage Clear, concise and timely communication Take advantage of local resources Explore feasibility of underground wiring “The LIPA leadership had a dress rehearsal with Tropical Storm Irene in August of last year,” the Councilman said. “Despite a pledge to enhance response and communication after Irene, the LIPA leadership failed miserably. It is imperative that a drastic change be implemented with LIPA’s emergency management and response plan.” The task may be daunting, Councilman Cuthbertson said, but one that is critically important to the safety and welfare of all Long Island residents. “This is a principle responsibility of government and Huntington is committed to providing any and all resources to prevent such a sad and unfortunate response from occurring again.” The Moreland Commission, a special State panel appointed by Governor Andrew Cuomo, is charged with investigating LIPA’s failures and develop a plan to address the shortfalls. You can watch a video of Councilman Cuthbertson's testimony by clicking here" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9HVZnGJJ5M&list=UUPa3tyOvuEoSyb_fYdBxDjA&index=1:


 


Petrone, Berland Welcome Alfredo’s Pane di Casa Bakery


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/30/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington – Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilwoman Susan A. Berland joined friends and family of owner Caterina Generoso at the November 30 grand opening of Alfredo’s Pane DiCasa Bakery. Supervisor Petrone and Councilwoman Berland welcomed the bakery, at 90 New York Avenue, as the latest addition to Huntington Village’s rich culinary scene and sampled some of the wide variety of Italian breads and pastries the shop features


 


Building Department Open Dec. 1 to Process Sandy-Related Applications


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/30/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

Supervisor Petrone and Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan A. Berland and Mark Mayoka with disaster-recovery expert John Houghtaling II.
 
Following the favorable response at Hurricane Sandy Recovery Night, the Town of Huntington will open the Building and Housing Department offices from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday December 1 to answer questions and process permit applications for repairing damage caused by the storm. This accommodation to property owners continues the Town’s efforts to help residents and businesses recover from Sandy’s effects. Those efforts include Supervisor Frank P. Petrone’s announcement immediately after the storm that the Town was streamlining the process of obtaining building permits and waiving all permit fees for Hurricane Sandy-related repairs. On Thursday November 29, Supervisor Petrone, Councilman Mark Cuthbertson and their Town Board colleagues sponsored Hurricane Sandy Recovery Night, an evening at which the Building and Housing Department met with property owners to process permits and representatives from the Long Island Builders Institute, the National Association of the Remodeling Industry, Gold Coast Bank, the Suffolk County Industrial Development Agency and Freeport Signs and Rigging offered advice on storm-related issues. People who attended also heard a presentation from New Orleans-based lawyer John Houghtaling II, one of the nation’s leading experts on disaster recovery, on the five things property owners need to know about dealing with insurance companies after a loss. In addition to accepting applications on Saturday, if all paperwork is in order, the Town will issue building permits on the spot.


 


Councilwoman Berland Presents Proclamation to Huntington Elks, Designates November as “Elks Veteran’s Remembrance Month”


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/29/2012
Author: Allison Jones

 
Huntington, NY – Councilwoman Susan A. Berland welcomed John J. Safarick, 1st Vice President of the Huntington Elks to Town Hall Monday afternoon to present the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of Huntington with an official proclamation from the Town of Huntington declaring the month of November as “Elks Veteran’s Remembrance Month. The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, a fraternal organization with over one million members, aims to inculcate the principles of charity, justice, brotherly love and fidelity; quicken the spirit of American patriotism; cultivate good fellowship and serve our veterans. The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks instituted the first G.I. Loan program for returning soldiers after World War I and sponsors programs promoting American patriotism and scholarship and support for our veterans. “It was a pleasure to present the Huntington Elks with a proclamation designating the month of November as ‘Elks Veteran’s Remembrance Month,’” commented Councilwoman Berland. “The Town of Huntington is proud to honor The Elks whose accomplishments and missions are clearly worthy of emulation. Honoring our veterans in the month of November is just one way to show our support for our brave servicemen and women and their families.”


 


Huntington Welcomes LaNotte Restaurant to Village


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/28/2012
Author: Steven Jimemez

 
The Town of Huntington recently welcomed a new family-owned establishment to the Town’s thriving downtown arena – La Notte Ristorante, located at 15 New Street. The restaurant’s proprietor, Joseph Competiello, marked the official grand opening with a celebratory ribbon cutting supported by local elected officials, members of the Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce and community. “I would like to welcome La Notte Ristorante to Huntington’s flavorful downtown and extend my best wishes to Joseph Competiello on his venture’s success,” stated Councilman Mark Cuthbertson. “Welcoming La Notte to Huntington Village was a pleasure,” commented Councilwoman Berland. “Huntington Village is well-known as a hub for great restaurants and shops and La Notte is a wonderful addition. We wish Joseph Competiello and the Loturco Family all the best with their new restaurant.” Pictured { From Left to Right} Ellen O’Brien and Mary Ann Hurd of the Huntington Chamber of Commerce, John LoTurco, Maria and Joseph Competiello, Councilmembers Mark Cuthbertson and Susan Berland and Town Clerk Jo-Ann Raia along with Larry Kushnick and Vita Scaturro of the Huntington Chamber of Commerce at La Notte Ristorante’s Ribbon Cutting ceremony.


 


Hurricane Sandy Recovery Night Adds Experts


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/28/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Town of Huntington's Hurricane Sandy Recovery Night has added two new participants to the roster of Town officials, industry and financial groups that will be providing advice to residents and businesses about dealing with the effects of the storm that devastated Long Island a month ago. John Houghtaling, a New Orleans based lawyer who is one of the nation's leading experts on disaster recover, will offer a seminar on five things property owners need to know about dealing with their insurance companies after a loss. Houghtaling, a former Long Island resident, is managing partner at Gauthier, Houghtaling & Williams. He has managed thousands of claims from Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Ike, and Isaac. His law firm represents policy holders and has settlements and verdicts of over 4 billion dollars. He travels extensively giving speeches and television interviews on management of insurance claims. Business owners will be able to speak with Hale Storm, founder and owner of Freeport Signs and Rigging. Storm has been providing design, fabrication, installation, repair and maintenance services to the Long Island and New York area for more than 40 years. Business owners will be provided with free advice and consultations about replacing signs damaged by the storm and are asked to bring photos for a free preliminary estimate. Previously scheduled participants include the Long Island Builders Institute; the National Association of the Rebuilding Industry; Gold Coast Bank; the Huntington Township, East Northport and Melville Chambers of Commerce; and the Suffolk County Industrial Development Agency. Representatives from the Town Department of Building and Housing to answer questions and to process permit applications. If all paperwork is in order, the Building Department will issue permits that night. Hurricane Sandy Recovery Night will be held on November 29 from 6 to 9 p.m. in Room 114 at Town Hall, 100 Main Street, Huntington.

 


A THANKSGIVING MESSAGE FROM SUPERVISOR PETRONE


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/22/2012

 
This is Supervisor Frank Petrone with a Huntington Alert THANK YOU !! On behalf of our Town Board please accept our appreciation and thanks for showing the true spirit of community during the terrible experiences of Super Storm Sandy. We all were challenged in many diverse ways from loss of power to loss of our homes. Your patience and strength makes us proud to serve you..... As we celebrate and give thanks, please remember the many town workers, electric line workers from LI and afar, the volunteers from the Red Cross, human services organizations and our religious institutions and every individual who gave to each of us......we have many heroes to thank. As we continue this spirit of giving during the many months ahead, we can be confident no one is alone.....May the BLESSINGS OF THANKSGIVING be with you and your families Thank You !!

 


Huntington To Hold Hurricane Sandy Recovery Night


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/20/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, Councilman Mark Cuthbertson and their Town Council colleagues today announced details of the latest effort to help Huntington residents and businesses in their recovery from Hurricane Sandy: a special evening at Town Hall at which the Town will process building permits and private industry and financial groups will be available to offer advice on finding and evaluating contractors and obtaining financing. Hurricane Sandy Recovery Night will be held on November 29 from 6 to 9 p.m. at Town Hall. The meeting will provide homeowners and businesses the opportunity to have questions answered one-on-one about the rebuilding process. “As residents and businesses begin moving forward to repair the damage Hurricane Sandy caused, the Town wants to do all it can to assist them,” Supervisor Petrone said. “Bringing government and the private sector together at the same time should help ease the process of making residents, businesses and the Town whole again.” “This is Huntington’s version of the three “r”s—repair, restore and rebuild,” Councilman Cuthbertson said. “Now that residents and businesses have obtained their damage assessments and received their insurance settlements, they are ready to start the construction process. We want residents and businesses to know that we are there to help ease the stress of repairing, restoring and rebuilding.” Immediately after the storm, Supervisor Petrone announced that the Town was streamlining the process of obtaining building permits and waiving all permit fees for Hurricane Sandy-related repairs. Continuing that effort, the Building Department will be at Hurricane Sandy Recovery Night to answer questions and to process permit applications. If all paperwork is in order, the Building Department will issue permits that night. To further help homeowners and businesses, the Town is partnering with two construction industry associations, the Long Island Builders Institute (LIBI) and the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI). LIBI and NARI will be on hand at Hurricane Sandy Recovery Night to offer advice about choosing contractors, assessing competing bids from contractors, and to answer specific questions about the construction process. The Town is also partnering with Gold Coast Bank, which will be at Hurricane Sandy Recovery night to offer advice about financing possibilities both for homeowners and businesses. Additionally. the Town is working with the Huntington, Melville and East Northport Chambers of Commerce on actions to promote recovery of businesses affected by the hurricane and will be working with them on specific programs, as well as with the Suffolk County Industrial Development Agency, which has established a program to grant sales tax relief to small businesses that need to purchase material and equipment to rebuild. The Town is also reaching out to other organizations that might be present at Hurricane Sandy Recovery Night to offer additional advice.


 


Third Annual Holiday Parade, Street Festival Scheduled for Nov. 24


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/16/2012

 
Huntington, NY – The Third Annual Holiday Parade and Street Festival in Huntington Village will kick off at 7 p.m. pm Saturday, November 24, bringing a rousing end to Small Business Saturday with Long Island’s biggest electric light holiday parade and float contest. The most noticeable differences from last year’s event, which drew more than 10,000 people, are a later starting time to allow people extra time to participate in Small Business Saturday and a different location for the holiday tree that will be lit as part of a brief ceremony following the parade. The tree will be located at the intersection of Wall and Gerard Streets, where it will remain for the entire holiday season. As was the case in previous years, the trees on the Village Green and at Town Hall will be lit simultaneously. Continuing from last year are competitions for the best floats in two categories – fire department and commercial – and for the best-decorated business. Numerous fire departments, scouts, and veterans and civic groups are scheduled to participate in the parade, which will begin at the Big H Shopping Center and proceed north on New York Avenue to Main Street, where it proceed west along Main Street past the reviewing stand at Wall Street to West Neck Road. Wall Street will be closed to traffic from Main Street to Gerard Street until 9 p.m. for the festival, which will include performances from many local groups and promotions from local merchants. In addition, the wildly popular Gamin ride truck will return, as will the horse and buggy rides. Parents are invited to bring their children to meet Santa and Mrs. Claus and some of their favorite characters, including Snoopy, The Grinch, Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, Sesame Street’s Elmo and Toy Story’s Woody. The Halesite Fire Department will have Buddy the Elf on board the actual sled used in filming the movie “Elf.” Free hot chocolate and cookies will be served. “This is only the parade’s third year, but already it has become an institution and an integral part of the holiday season in Huntington,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “This is another example of what makes Huntington such a special place during the holiday season and year-round.” The parade and festival’s sponsors include the Town, the Huntington Village and Huntington Station Business Improvement Districts, the Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce, the Huntington and Huntington Manor Fire Departments and the Huntington Chiefs’ Council. People are encouraged to bring non-perishable food to help replenish the Huntington Food Council food pantry depleted as a result of Hurricane Sandy. Bins will be placed at locations along the parade route and at the festival.

 


New Date, Location Set for Informational Meeting on Proposed HART Route and Schedule Changes


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/13/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
An informational meeting on proposed route and schedule changes for Huntington Area Rapid Transit (HART) that was cancelled in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy will now be held on Saturday, November 17 from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the Northport Public Library, 151 Laurel Ave., Northport. The changes, the first significant route and schedule changes since the Town-operated bus system began operations in 1978, would take effect in January. Under the plan, the existing three routes would be replaced with four new routes, adding 20.5 miles to the system. Buses will run more frequently than under current schedules. The changes will offer better direct service with less need to transfer between buses to complete trips. The new routes maintain service to all major facilities. However, two weekday peak-rail feeder routes that have lost most of their ridership are being eliminated. The new routes can also be viewed on the town’s website at http://huntingtonny.gov/hart_bus.cfm. The November 17 session replaces one that had been scheduled for November 3 at the East Northport Public Library and is the second of two such meetings. The first was held in Huntington October 27. HART will be running more frequent service on November 17 to make it more convenient for residents to attend.

 


CHANGE IN CONTACT NUMBER


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/12/2012

 
The number to contact the Town's Public Safety Department in emergencies has returned to 351-3234. The number used during Hurricane Sandy and in its aftermath, 271-6573, is no longer active.

 


FEMA INDIVIDUAL ASSISTANCE VAN TO BE AT TOWN HALL NOVEMBER 11 AND 12


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/10/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone announces that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)’s Individual Assistance Van will be at Town Hall Sunday November 11 and Monday November 12 to offer advice, help homeowners determine if they are eligible for Hurricane Sandy disaster assistance and to aid with the necessary paperwork. The van will be at the Jackson Avenue side of Town Hall, which is located at 100 Main Street, Huntington, from 1 to 8 p.m. Sunday and 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday. FEMA’s website defines disaster assistance as “financial or direct assistance to individuals and families whose property has been damaged or destroyed as a result of a federally-declared disaster, and whose losses are not covered by insurance. It is meant to help you with critical expenses that cannot be covered in other ways. This assistance is not intended to restore your damaged property to its condition before the disaster.” FEMA suggests that before visiting the van, homeowners visit the website www.disasterassistance.gov to learn about the various types of aid available and basic eligibility guidelines. In other storm-related actions, Supervisor Petrone anounced that the Town-operated shelter at the Village Green Center will close at 8 p.m. Saturday, November 10, as a result of dramatic drop in the number of individuals using the shelter as residents find places to stay with family and friends. The eight warming centers operated by a coalition of the Town, social services agencies and local houses of worship will remain open. Additionally, the Veterans Day wreath-laying ceremony originally scheduled for Sunday November 11 has been cancelled.

 


INFANT FORMULA AVAILABLE AND OTHER UPDATES


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/7/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
This is an update as of 5 p.m. November 7: Long Island Cares has received the first of nine expected shipments of infant formula, coordinated through FEMA, to help families in need. If you or your family is in need of infant formula, contact Long Island Cares at 631-582-FOOD or www.facebook.com/licares. The Fountainhead Congregation, 782 Larkfield Road, East Northport, will be serving hot food from 5 to 8 p.m. nightly for persons without power. The church also has facilities for charging electronic devices and for children to play. HART Bus has resumed full fixed route and paratransit service. The warming cent at the William J. Brosnan School in Northport will close beginning tomorrow, November 8. All other warming centers remain open, as is the Red Cross-operated shelter at the Village Green Center..

 


PETRONE OPENS VILLAGE GREEN AS SHELTER


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/6/2012

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone announces that he is opening the Town’s Village Green Senior Center as a shelter for persons affected by Hurricane Sandy and the upcoming storm. Supervisor Petrone’s action followed the announcement that Walt Whitman High School would no longer be available as a shelter and that the American Red Cross would be consolidating its shelter operations at St. Joseph’s College in Patchogue. “For Huntingtonians, Patchogue is a long way to travel, especially when gasoline supplies are tight. With cold weather tonight and a second storm approaching, we don’t want anyone who feels they need a shelter to stay at home in the cold beause of the distrance they would have to travel.” Supevisor Petrone contacted the Huntington YMCA, which readily agreed to make their gymnasium in their portion of the building available as a sleeping area for persons wishing to spend the night. The Red Cross agreed to provide cots, meals and staff for the shelter. “I thank the YMCA and the Red Cross for quickly joining the Town in this effort,” Supervisor Petrone said. The shelter at 423 Park Avenue, will open Wednesday, November 7 upon closing of the Walt Whitman shelter and will remain open as needed. Programming at the Senior Center will continue.

 


NOVEMBER 5 UPDATE


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/5/2012

 
This is an update for Nov. 5, 2012, on Town actions in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy: The Village Green senior center will open as an additional warming center starting Tuesday, Nov. 6, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Full programming will resume at the Senior Center on Wednesday, Nov. 7, as will Adult Day Care. The William J. Brosnan School will remain open as a warming center on Tuesday, Nov. 6. The free public skating at the Dix Hills Ice rink will continue on Tuesday, Nov. 6. HART bus will operate on a Saturday schedule because of election day. HART paratransit for medical transfer will resume, subject to road conditions.

 


Huntington Town, Religious Institutions, Social Services Agencies Announce Warming Centers


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/2/2012

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, the Town Council and a coalition of religious institutions and social services agencies announced today that they will open six warming centers in the Town, giving residents without electricity in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy places where they can go to warm up, charge electronic devices, get some food and generally get a brief respite from dealing with the effects of the storm. “The weather is getting colder, people are feeling more stressed as they continue to live without heat or electricity and they need places where they can go to relax, get warm and feel less isolated because of the lack of power,” Supervisor Petrone said. “The Town, the religious institutions and the social services agencies all help people in their times of need, and coping with the effects of Hurricane Sandy defines a time of need.” The decision to open the warming centers was an outgrowth of meetings the Supervisor convened in his office attended by representatives of the Family Service League. Tri-Community Youth Agency, Helping Hand Rescue Mission, Temple Beth El of Huntington, Central Presbyterian Church, St. Hugh of Lincoln Roman Catholic Church, Light of Salvation Church, Bethel AME Church, United Methodist Church and the Huntington YMCA. At the meetings, the representatives described their individual outreach efforts and a consensus was reached to coordinate them and open the warming centers. They will be staffed by a combination of volunteers and Town employees. Supervisor Petrone asked Peggy Boyd, vice president of community services and advocacy at the Family Service League of Long Island, to coordinate the effort. The centers and their times of operation were announced at a news conference attended by Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan Berland, Mark Mayoka and Eugene Cook, as well as by the religious and nonprofit groups. The centers, their hours of operation and their facilities are: Central Presbyterian Church 240 Main Street, Huntington Open: Monday to Sunday: 10 a.m. – 3p.m. Providing: Sandwiches, charging stations and internet access Temple Beth El 660 Park Avenue, Huntington Open: Sundays – 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday to Thursday: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Providing: Warming area, water and charging stations St. Hugh of Lincoln R. C. Church New York Avenue at East 9th Street Huntington Station Open: Monday to Saturday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Providing: Warming Center and charging stations Light of Salvation Church 1599 New York Avenue Huntington Station Open: Monday to Saturday: 9am to 6pm Sunday: 9 am to 1pm Providing: Warming center and food. Dix Hills Ice Rink Dix Hills Park 575 Vanderbilt Parkway, Dix Hills – 11746 Open: Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday to Friday: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Providing: Free ice skating, coffee and hot chocolate, showers, and charging stations. Snacks can be purchased at the concession stand Huntington YMCA 60 Main Street-11743 Open: 8am to 5pm Providing: Showers only

 


MEETING CANCELLATIONS AND OTHER UPDATES


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/1/2012

 
This information is active as of 9 a.m. on Thursday, November 1, 2012: The Zoning Board of Appeals meeting scheduled for tonight has been canceled. Traffic violations hearings scheduled for tonight will not be held. The hearings will be rescheduled. HART bus service remains suspended. Regular refuse collection resumed today. Room 114 at Town Hall is open at a charging station for electronic devices and for the public to use computers, copiers and fax machines. Internet service, including wi-fi in the room, is intermittent and slow when operating. Key telephone numbers remain the highway hotline, 499-0444, for downed trees; the public safety emergency number, 271-6573; and 800-490-0075 to report outages to LIPA.

 


TOWN HALL WILL BE OPEN ON OCTOBER 31 AND OTHER UPDATES


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/31/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Supervisor Frank P. Petrone sent this telephone messagel to Town residents on Tuesday October 30: As we are all dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, I want to let you know about your Town government's priorities in helping you get your life back to normal. Town crews are working to clear debris from streets to get them open and passable. This effort depends on LPA's ability to clear utility lines from downed trees. We hope to have all roads cleared within a few days. After that, the Town will begin removing and disposing of the debris. Town Hall will be open tomorrow, Wednesday, October 31. Job one for all Town employees will be to help you. we are streamlining the permit process so can begin making your repairs faster, and we are waiving the usual permit fees. We will be setting up a room at Town Hall with computers, fax machines and a copier where you can charge your electronic devices and attend to your vital business. Internet service should be available in a few days. Both fixed route and paratransit HART bus service will remain suspended at least through tomorrow. Resumption of HART service will depend on how quickly the roads are cleared of debris and traffic signals are restored so they can travel safely. There will be no recycling collection on Wednesday and the Halloween parade in Huntington Village is canceled. Regular refuse collection will resume on Thursday and Friday. Launch service will resume on Wednesday so people can check on their boats. If you need to let us know about a downed tree, call the highway hotline at 499-0444. For emergencies, call the Town's public safety department at 271-6573. For power issues, call LIPA at 800-490-0075. Be patient, stay safe and realize we are trying our best to help you get back to normal as quickly as possible.

 


TOWN HALL CLOSED ON TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/30/2012

 
Because of the effects of Hurricane Sandy, Huntington Town Hall will be closed on Tuesday, October 30, 2012.

 


TOWN HALL CLOSES EARLY BECAUSE OF STORM


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/29/2012

 
Because of the storm, Huntington Town Hall closed at 12:30 p.m. today.

 


BUSES AVAILABLE TO TAKE RESIDENTS TO A SHELTER


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/29/2012

 
The Town of Huntington is providing buses at four locations to take persons the Red Cross-operated shelter at Walt Whitman High School. The buses are located at the Seminary of the Immaculate Conception in Lloyd Harbor, the First Presbyterian Church on Main Street in Northport, at 403 Ft. Salonga Road in Northport and at the Town’s Village Green Activity Center on Park Avenue in Huntington,

 


HART BUS WILL NOT OPERATE ON MONDAY, OCTOBER 29


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/28/2012

 
Because of Hurricane Sandy, HART bus will not operate on Monday, October 29, 2012.

 


PETRONE DECLARES EMERGENCY BECAUSE OF HURRICANE SANDY


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/27/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
In expectation of Huntington feeling the effects of Hurricane Sandy, Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone declared a state of emergency, effective at 5 p.m. Saturday, October 27, 2012, to aid in emergency preparations Supervisor Petrone also ordered the Town’s Emergency Operations Center to open at 5 p.m. on Sunday, October 28, to help coordinate communications among Town departments and fire and rescue services. Representatives from several Town departments with key emergency responsibilities were told to report to the Center, in the Town's general services facility on Pulaski Road in Huntington Station. Under a state of emergency, the Supervisor has the power to close roads, appropriate necessary equipment from all sources and make necessary purchases without following the usual procedures. The declaration also makes available to the Highway Department Town equipment and personnel to assist Highway Department crews. The Supervisor cancelled refuse pickup for Monday and Tuesday, October 29 and 30. Residents are asked not to put out any refuse until their next pickup date. The Supervisor also said that Town parks and beaches will be closed, beginning at 5 p.m. Sunday October 28 through Tuesday October 30. The Supervisor previously had cancelled all programs and activities at Town facilities over that same time period. Supervisor Petrone advised residents to check the Town’s website, http://huntingtonny.gov, the Town’s Facebook page or government access channels 18 (Cablevision) and 38 (FIOS) for updates. Once the Emergency Operations Center opens at 5 p.m. Sunday, October 28, anyone needing to contact the Town for emergencies can call 271-6573. They can call the highway hotline at 499-0444 to report downed trees. Power outages should be reported to LIPA at 800-490-0075.

 


Petrone Urges Residents to Begin Storm Preparations


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/26/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone urged Town residents to begin making preparations for coping with Hurricane Sandy, whose effects are expected to be felt in the Town early next week. “Now is the time for everybody to secure loose objects, ensure that they have adequate supplies of food and water, fuel their vehicles and make plans about how they will communicate with loved ones,” Supervisor Petrone said,. “As the storm progresses, I ask people to consider this motto: Be aware, be prepared and be safe.” Supervisor Petrone cancelled all Town-sponsored meetings, events and programs and all outside organizations using Town facilities for events, meetings and programs at Town facilities starting at 5 p.m. Sunday, October 28. 2012, through Tuesday, October 30, 2012. The status of events scheduled for Wednesday, October 31, 2012, will be determined after the storm. Among the events cancelled is the educational forum on the dangers of sudden cardiac arrest and the use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) hat had been scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday at Town Hall. The forum will be rescheduled. The launch service provided by the Town Department of Maritime Services will continue as long as conditions exist so boaters can check on their vessels. To help in storm preparation, residents can download the Town’s Hurricane Preparedness Handbook at the Town’s website, http://HuntingtonNY.gov. As the storm progresses, residents can gain updated information by visiting the Town’s website or its Facebook page, by tuning to the Town’s government access channels 18 (Cablevision) or 38 (FiOS), or by tuning into local television and radio stations. Residents are asked to keep these emergency numbers handy: the Highway Hotline, 499-0444; the Town’s public safety department, 271-6753; and, to report a power outage, call LIPA at 800-490-0075.

 


SIGN UP FOR OCT. 30 EDUCATIONAL FORUM ON DANGERS OF SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/25/2012

 
In an effort to raise awareness of the dangers of sudden cardiac arrest and the importance of establishing a formal emergency response plan to assist those stricken with cardiac arrest, the Town of Huntington and Huntington Hospital, in partnership with two outstanding not-for-profit organizations, will sponsor an educational forum on Tuesday evening, October 30. The free event, scheduled for 7 p.m. at Huntington Town Hall, will feature medical experts on sudden cardiac arrest and detailed information on the simple steps needed to establish an AED program for your organization, business or place of worship. The forum will include personal accounts from residents who survived incidents of cardiac arrest – thanks to immediate CPR and the use of an AED. Joining the survivors will be heroes who applied their training and saved the lives of other victims. Also scheduled to speak are Karen Acompora, co-founder of the Louis J. Acompora Memorial Foundation and Melinda Murray, founder of the Dominic A. Murray 21 Memorial Foundation. Both women lost their children to sudden cardiac arrest and are now leading advocacy efforts on Long Island to raise awareness of sudden cardiac arrest and the critical need to make AEDs readily accessible. Karen and Melinda will explain how their organizations can help with all aspects of establishing an AED program. For every minute that passes and defibrillation is not administered the chance of survival drops by 10 percent. Time is of the essence when someone is in cardiac arrest. Please join us on October 30 and help make a difference. Space is limited. Please contact Don McKay at the Town of Huntington to register. He may be reached at (631) 351-3309 or dmckay@huntingtonny.gov.

 


Route and Schedule Changes Proposed for HART


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/22/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Area Rapid Transit, the Town-operated bus system known as HART, is about to institute the first significant route and schedule changes since it began operating in 1978. The changes, which would take effect in January, will replace the existing three routes with four new routes, adding 20.5 miles to the system. Buses will run more frequently than under current schedules. The changes will offer better direct service with less need to transfer between buses to complete trips. The Town hopes that these changes will encourage more people to use HART, the only Town-operated bus system on Long Island. The new routes maintain service to all major facilities. However, two weekday peak-rail feeder routes that have lost most of their ridership are being eliminated. The changes are the result of careful review of the findings in a three-year study conducted by a consultant the Town hired, Abrams-Cherwony & Associates. The Town is holding informational meetings about the changes on Saturday October 27 at the Cinema Arts Center in Huntington and on November 3 at the East Northport Public Library. Both meetings are from 10:30 a.m. to noon. HART will be running more frequent service on those days to make it more convenient for residents to attend. The new routes can also be viewed on the town’s website at http://huntingtonny.gov/hart_bus.cfm.

 


Huntington Joins Federal Action Against National Grid


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/17/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its meeting yesterday, voted to join an action before a federal agency charging National Grid with monopolistic behavior in negotiating long term leases with the Long Island Power Authority that has the effect of keeping the cost of electricity high by freezing out competition. The Northport- East Northport School District, at its October 15 meeting, also voted to intervene in the action before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. In the action, Port Jefferson Village asks FERC to investigate and hold a hearing into alleged fraudulent practices and illegal exercise of market power by National Grid, which owns the major plants that generate Long Island’s electricity, including ones in Port Jefferson and Northport. The FERC complaint seeks an order forcing National Grid to divest itself of its existing generating facilities in the Long Island Control Area, which would include the one at Northport. The Town Board resolution, sponsored by Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, notes that of specific concern to the Town is the allegation that National Grid’s actions were designed to force LIPA into a long-term extension of its power supply agreement and otherwise curtail opportunities to re-power Long Island’s existing generating facilities and manipulate the market. The resolution notes that while the Town, in response to a request for information, has filed a proposal with a State agency outlining a proposal to increase the Northport plant’s capacity and increase its efficiency, National Grid has yet to respond. The Town Board resolution also notes that the outcome of the FERC proceedings could have a significant effect on the challenges National Grid brought, in conjunction with LIPA, to the Northport plant’s assessment, seeking massive refunds of real property taxes. “LIPA has used the assessment on the generating plants as a smokescreen for the real reason electricity costs are so high: the way it has colluded with National Grid to freeze out competition and ignore proposals to power Long Island more cheaply and efficiently.” Supervisor Petrone said. “We hope a FERC investigation and full airing will lay bare how National Grid and LIPA are keeping electric costs high.” “LIPA and National Grid continue to spew misinformation about why customers pay so much for their electricity,” Councilman Cuthbertson said. “Joining the action with FERC will help ensure that Huntington taxpayers’ interests are properly represented and hopefully allow the facts about the situation to receive a public airing.” In particular, LIPA has included a page on its website with supposed “facts” about the assessment challenges that contains erroneous or misleading information. The misleading information includes: · A claim that challenging their taxes is a matter of fairness to their 1.1 million customers. However, the majority of those customers live in the very areas where LIPA has challenged its taxes. The Town of Brookhaven, Northport School District and Village of Port Jefferson alone accounts for about 250,000 of those customers. LIPA has filed tax cases in fifteen different locations on Long Island. The effect of these claims, if successful, will be to take money out of the pocket of many taxpayers and return the money – in part – to those same individuals as ratepayers. A recovery of $40,000,000 would mean a One Cent reduction in rates, hardly a significant savings to ratepayers. · A claim that property taxes account for over 14.7 per cent of their customers’ bills. However, that figure includes all taxes, a significant part of which is taxes paid to the state. · A suggestion that the assessment on the Northport plant has been improperly raised over the years. In fact, the assessment of the Northport Power Station, like most of the contested assessments, has remained constant since the creation of LIPA by the State Legislature in 1986. For almost 25 years the existing assessment had been accepted and taxes paid by LIPA. The Town believes that one of the conditions for the creation of LIPA was a statutory requirement that the Authority would not challenge the pre-existing assessments unless they were unreasonably altered. · A claim that that the Public Service Commission expects regulated utilities to routinely challenge their assessments. That is a misstatement of PSC policy which only asks that regulated utilities regularly review their assessments as part of their self-audits. Most utility assessments are addressed by consultation with the local assessor and the New York State Office of Real Property Services. There has been no such consultation by LIPA. Further, LIPA is not regulated by the PSC nor is it a private company. As a public authority it has a duty to conduct its affairs so as to balance the overlapping interests of all of the citizens of Long Island – not to penalize taxpayers in pursuit of a more profitable “bottom line”. · The U.S. Department of Labor reports that electric prices in the New York City area, including Long Island, are 50% higher than nationwide and piped gas prices are 20% higher. Long Island ratepayers are still paying off the costs of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant. High gas and electric prices on Long Island are the result of many factors other than property taxes, including a bloated administrative force at LIPA that Governor Cuomo’s office has recently criticized. More than one-third of the Northport-East Northport School District’s annual tax revenue comes from the taxes paid on the Northport Power Plant, which is why the district moved to join the FERC action. “The School District believes that joining the FERC action will help to ensure that the School District’s interests are represented in this proceeding.” said Board of Education President, Stephen W. Waldenburg, Jr. The district noted that on October 2, LIPA and National Grid extended the Power Supply Agreement. The terms of the Agreement have not been publicly disclosed; however, LIPA reports that the extended Agreement would contain a pricing formula similar to the current Power Supply Agreement at rates to be approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. “We are certain that the Commission will review the cost of power to ratepayers on Long Island and investigate the allegations of fraudulent practices and illegal exercise of market power,” said President Waldenburg, Jr. The Town is vigorously defending the assessment challenges and has retained as experts a land appraiser, an engineering appraiser and an economist looking at the financial impacts of the Northport plant. The Town has also conducted settlement discussions with LIPA. Those discussions are ongoing.

 


Petrone Moves to Name Armory after Conte


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/17/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone moved at last night’s Town Board meeting to name the Huntington Station Armory after the late Assemb. James A. Conte, who passed away earlier in the day after a long battle with cancer. The Town Board unanimously approved Supervisor Petrone’s resolution, which noted that one of Assemb. Conte’s last official acts was to sponsor the bill that directed the state to transfer and convey the Armory at 100 E. 5th Street to the Town. The State had declared the property surplus after several National Guard units’ operations, including the one in Huntington Station, were consolidated in a facility in Farmingdale. “Jim Conte was a distinguished legislator and a dear friend who kept the interests of his constituents and community foremost in his heart,” Supervisor Petrone said. “He worked with us as we undertook and continue the process of revitalizing Huntington Station and, in particular, he was relentless in making sure that the Town was able to secure the Armory in Huntington Station for community uses. Naming the Armory after him is a fitting tribute and a living memorial to someone who will truly be missed.” The Town and the State are in the process of taking the final steps necessary for the transfer of the building, which, after the Town takes title will be called the James D. Conte Center.

 


Town Offers Free Spaying or Neutering of Pit Bulls and Pit Bull Mixes


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/2/2012

 
In recognition of October as Pit Bull Awareness Month, the Town of Huntington is partnering with the League for Animal Protection to offer free spaying or neutering of pit bulls and pit bull mixes owned by Town residents. “The Town and the League have worked together at our shelter to increase awareness of the adoptability of pit bulls as pets and to work with the pit bull and pit bull mixes at the shelter to make them more adoptable,” Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “This one-month program is a logical extension of that effort, encouraging Huntington residents to be responsible pet owners by having their pets spayed or neutered to help reduce the unwanted pet population.” Persons wishing to take advantage of the one-month program should visit the Town Animal Shelter on Deposit Road in East Northport and bring proof of residency. They will be given a voucher that they can take to a participating veterinarian, who will perform the procedure. For more information, contact the shelter at 631-754-8722.

 


Petrone Releases 2013 Budget Proposal


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/28/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone today presented a $181.7 million proposed 2013 operating budget that, even in the face of difficult financial pressures and mandated increases in employee health and pension costs, calls for only marginal increases in spending and taxes while maintaining the programs and services residents demand. The 0.83 percent increase in the Town’s total tax – or about $19 for the average homeowner – falls well below the State-mandated 2 percent tax cap limit and reflects both difficult decisions in spending for Town functions as well as a $1.5 million decrease in capital spending. “The focus of this Budget is to maintain critical and essential services at necessary levels without a cumulative tax increase,” Supervisor Petrone said, characterizing the proposal in the budget message to his Town Board colleagues, as a “responsible spending plan that stresses the Town Board’s fiduciary responsibility to the Town’s taxpayers despite poor economic times.” He additionally noted, “The preparation of this Budget document has been a collaborative effort between my office, the office of the Comptroller and the Directors of Huntington’s administrative offices and departments. I add that its preparation also benefited from an unprecedented level of participation by all members of the Town Board: Mr. Cuthbertson, Ms. Berland, Mr. Mayoka and Mr. Cook, all of whom attended my meetings with Departmental Directors.” In his message, the Supervisor noted that his previous two budgets had reduced spending through salary freezes, blue collar attrition and by targeting efficiencies town-wide in every department and office, trimming non-personnel related costs to the bone. “Opportunities to achieve additional operational savings in the same manner are becoming more difficult to find,” Supervisor Petrone noted in his budget message. “This fact coupled with flat revenues, the impact of continual increases in State mandated personnel costs, and the increases in the price of commodities and energy, all over which the Town exerts no control, means that the 2013 Budget requires very, very difficult choices.” In particular, mandated pension and health insurance costs are projected to increase by $2.7 million in 2013 and the other costs over which the town has no control are projected to increase by $500,000. Meanwhile, mortgage tax revenues are projected to decrease by $400,000. The difficult choices to respond to those stresses, as reflected in the 2013 budget, include: A capital budget of $8.6 million, $1.5 million less than in 2012. Projected $1.5 million in white-collar personnel savings that could include the elimination of positions unless equivalent savings can be negotiated with CSEA, the union representing white-collar employees. The Town is currently working with the CSEA to reach an agreement on the savings. Fee increases in various areas where the Town has historically charged far less than required to operate and maintain services, most notably parking and Town recreation programs. These fee increases are projected to total $4.1 million. The use of $3.9 million of fund balances and reserves, less than in 2011. The projected 0.83 percent overall tax hike reflects increases in the General and Refuse Funds, offset by savings in the Highway and Part Town Funds. A mild winter, coupled with reimbursement from FEMA for Tropical Storm Irene expenses, as well as a healthy reserve account to draw upon all contributed to the reduction in Highway taxes. The Town also will continue to realize the savings from Supervisor Petrone’s plan, approved by the Town Board earlier this year, to refinance approximately one-quarter of the Town’s outstanding debt. The Town was able to sell the re-issues at rates of less than 1 percent, which will generate more than $2-million in saving over the next seven years. In total this judicious approach to managing capital spending translates to a decrease in debt service of $130,000 in 2013. Supervisor Petrone noted that capital spending over the past few years has included major and costly measures to improve parking, including restoration of the North and South parking garages at the Huntington Long Island Rail Road station, as well as additional parking at the Cold Spring Harbor. The Town has also acquired property and created new parking at several locations in Huntington Village. In 2013, while the Town will limit most capital spending, one project that will move forward without interruption is the multi-million dollar reconstruction of the Town’s largest parking facility on Gerard Street opposite the Huntington Post Office. A public hearing on the proposal will be held at 6 p.m. on Oct. 16.

 


Town Board Urges State Action on Bamboo, Liquor Stores


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/25/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board at its Sept. 24 meeting voted to urge State action on two measures of importance to Town residents: adding invasive bamboo to the invasive species list the State is promulgating and placing limits on the number of retail liquor store licenses that can be issued within a geographic area. The bamboo resolution, sponsored by Councilwoman Susan A. Berland, was approved unanimously and followed previous attempts by Councilwoman Berland and Supervisor Frank P. Petrone to amend the Town Code to regulate the planting of invasive bamboo species. In remarks at a public hearing and during the public portion of recent Town Board meetings, residents have described for the Board the damage caused by bamboo migrating from neighboring properties. The resolution approved at the meeting takes note of a recent amendment to the State Environmental Conservation Law, effective next January 20, that requires the New York State Council on Invasive Species to work with other state departments to develop and promulgate joint regulations restricting the sale, purchase, possession, propagation, introduction, importation, transport and disposal of invasive species. “If ever there were a plant that fits the definition of invasive, it is bamboo,” Councilwoman Berland said. “I hope as the State puts together its list of invasive species covered by its new law, the type of evidence presented to this town Board will clearly make the case that bamboo should be included in the regulated category.” “The stories residents have told us about how invasive bamboo has hurt their quality of life have been heart-wrenching,” Supervisor Petrone said. “Whether it is through Town Code or State regulations, it is clear that action must be taken to protect residents.” The liquor store resolution, sponsored by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, followed presentations to the Town Board by area liquor store owners asking for the Town to oppose the granting of a liquor license for a store proposed for 295 W. Jericho Tpke., Huntington Station In addressing the Town Board, the liquor store owners noted that a significant number of stores already existed within a one-to-three mile radius from the proposed location. Noting that the undue proliferation of liquor stores within the Town was not in the public interest, the Town Board voted to ask the State Liquor Authority to conduct a public hearing into whether a license should be issued for that address, and, in a 3-2 vote on the broader measure, to urge the Governor and the State Legislature to place limits on the number of retail liquor store licenses that can be issued within a geographic area. Supervisor Petrone and Councilwoman Berland joined Councilman Cuthbertson in calling for the state legislation. “State law has long recognized the need to regulate the sale of alcoholic beverages, and defining how many liquor stores in an area constitutes saturation is a logical extension of this regulatory function,” Councilman Cuthbertson said. “The State Legislature needs to address this situation to help preserve residents’ quality of life.” In other action. Supervisor Petrone announced that a special Town Board meeting will be held at 9 a.m. on Friday, Sept. 28, to present the 2013 Town Budget.

 


11th Annual Women's Networking Day Focuses on Finding Your Own Inner Beauty


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/20/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Huntington Town Supervisor Frank Petrone and members of the Town Council invite residents to the Town’s 11th Annual Women’s Networking Day and Awards Ceremony, which this year carries the theme “Luxurious from the Inside Out,” and focuses on finding your own inner beauty. The Oct. 2 event, under the auspices of the Town’s Division of Women’s Services, will include more than 50 informational booths, where experts will provide attendees with information, advice and demonstrations on a range of topics. One of the featured booths and sponsor of the event will highlight The Northport Wellness Center, a multidisciplinary holistic healthcare facility, which offers a range of services including BrainCore Therapy (BCT). BCT serves as an effective, drugless, non-invasive approach to help individuals with a host of issues including: ADD/ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Learning Disorders, Migraine and Tension Headaches, Insomnia, Chronic Pain/Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Anxiety, Seizure Disorder and Tics. Using over 40 years of university-based research studies, BCT was designed to bring neurofeedback out of the lab and into the public domain. The BrainCore machine uses surface electrodes to measure brainwave activity and then uses auditory, visual or tactile feedback to help the patient to train their brain to control this feedback. The repetitive use of this positive feedback teaches the brain to create new pathways and make existing pathways more efficient, allowing brainwave patterns to normalize and bring the nervous system back into balance. Another innovative discipline of the Northport Wellness Center being featured on October 2 is Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT). Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy is the use of high pressure oxygen to help treat a variety of health conditions and diseases. Breathing 100% oxygen under pressures greater than sea level helps each cell in the body preserve, repair and enhance function. HBOT provides the body with a greater opportunity for reducing swelling, fighting disease, infection and healing itself. As October is also Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the Division of Women’s Services together with Cactus Salon will be raising funds for Huntington Breast Cancer Action Coalition through the sale of pink hair extensions that will be sold at the reduced price of $10 with $5 of every sale being donated to HBCAC. In addition, Cactus Salon will also be present with color consultants and stylists showcasing all of their wonderful services for women. The Women’s Division presents this annual event in order to help the public receive important information and learn about services offered by the Town’s numerous non-profit organizations. The Town Board will also be honoring five exceptional women during the annual awards ceremony. The event will be held from 11 a.m.to 3 p.m. at the Larkfield Manor, 507 Larkfield Road, East Northport. General admission is $10/$8 for seniors and includes lunch and raffles. For information, call Rhonda Shepardson, Director of Women’s Services, at 631-351-3291, or e-mail rshepardson@huntingtonny.gov

 


Huntington Saves $2 million in Bond Refinancing


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/14/2012

 
The Town of Huntington this week refinanced $22.6 million in debt, saving the Town more than $2 million in interest costs over the next seven years. With a continuing AAA rating from all three rating agencies, the bonds sold at an interest rate of 0.92 percent, less than three quarters of the average 4 percent original interest on the refinanced bonds, which were issued between 2002 and 2005. The $2.029 million savings is three times what had been projected when the Town Board approved the refinancing in May. The term of the bonds remains unchanged. “These savings are a direct result of the hard work keeping the Town’s fiscal affairs in order to preserve the AAA bond rating and of the invaluable advice and expertise provided by our bond counsel and fiscal advisor for bonding issues,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “In particular, I would like to thank Bob Kerr at New York Municipal Advisors Corporation for helping arrange and time the sale to achieve the maximum savings.” In 2009, NYMAC recommended a similar refinancing of $13 million of other Town debt that also saved taxpayers about $700,000. Earlier this year, also as a result of the AAA ratings, the Town sold $7.6 million in bonds, mostly for highway projects, at the favorable interest rate of 2.23 percent, more than half a percentage rate than what similar bonds sold for in 2011.

 


Petrone Encourages Signing Up for Huntington Alert


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/5/2012

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone is reminding residents to sign up for Huntington Alert, the Town’s emergency notification system, which recently underwent an upgrade that allows the Town to notify residents on a number of different platforms. Beginning Sept. 1, the Town began using Emergency Communications Network’s CodeRED to maintain the data base of numbers to be called and to send out the messages as needed. CodeRED provides the Town with the additional flexibility to deliver messages to cell phones, to send text messages and to notify persons who have downloaded the CodeRED Mobile Alert App on their GPS-enabled smart phones when they are driving into an area that is the subject of an alert. The CodeRED service includes a database with many listed residential and commercial telephone numbers in the Town. However, persons with unlisted telephone numbers or with cell phones as their primary telephone will not be called unless they sign up through the Town’s website, http://HuntingtonNY.gov. Click on the Huntington Alert icon on the home page. Persons without Internet access can sign up by calling 631-351-3044. “No one should automatically assume his or her phone number is included,” Supervisor Petrone said. “Because we want to ensure that our emergency notifications reach the widest possible audience, we encourage residents and businesses – even if they have listed numbers – to register for Huntington Alert.” In particular, signing up at the site will allow residents and businesses to identify a preferred telephone number for the call, as well as to provide an address for e-mail alerts. Required information includes first and last name, street address (physical address, no P.O. boxes), city, state, zip code, and primary phone number, additional phone numbers can be entered as well. All businesses should register, as well as all individuals who have unlisted phone numbers, who have changed their phone number or address within the past year, and those who use a cellular phone or VoIP phone as their primary number. People who have already signed up for Huntington Alert do not have to sign up again, unless they want to change their call options or add information.

 


LDC Closes on First Bond Issue


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/30/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Town of Huntington Local Development Corp., in its first action to fulfill its mandate to stimulate job growth and employment and to promote community and economic development, has closed on the issuance of $20 million in revenue bonds on behalf of Developmental Disabilities Institute (DDI). DDI plans to use the revenue from the bonds to refinance existing debt and for the construction, renovation and equipping of facilities in both Huntington and Smithtown. DDI will be responsible for the repayment. Of the $20 million issued, $19.6 million are tax-exempt. The closing occurred on August 29. “This bond issue falls squarely into why we formed the LDC: to help deserving not-for-profit organizations with their financial needs while providing a stimulus for the local economy,” said Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, who is president and chairman of the LDC board. “The proceeds from these bonds will help fund projects that create local construction jobs and provide a boost to the local economy, while adding much-needed residential alternatives for DDI’s clients,” said Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, the LDC vice president. Added Councilwoman Susan Berland, who is the secretary of the LDC, “We hope this financing opportunity for DDI will serve as a model for other not-for-profit groups in the community who, either individually or through pooling needs with other non-profits, can take advantage of the benefits LDC financing offers. In the long run, measures that make these groups stronger make our community stronger.” “The Town of Huntington should feel very good about what was accomplished,” said David Bartash, chair of DDI’s Board of Directors. “Not only is the Town’s LDC fulfilling its objective to help stimulate the local economy and job growth, but DDI is being helped to fulfill its mission of supporting children and adults with disabilities and their families, many of whom are residents of Huntington.” Founded in 1961 to address the special needs of children with Autism and other developmental disabilities and to provide therapeutic intervention, DDI today is a multi-site agency serving over 1,500 children and adults with Autism and related disorders. DDI provides educational, residential, day habilitation and vocational services, as well as medical and dental services to over 5,000 patients across Long Island through its Opti-Healthcare Division. It is the largest provider of services and programs for children and adults with Autism on Long Island. The Town of Huntington LDC was formed in February 2010 to promote job growth and employment, increase job opportunities, promote community and economic development and create jobs. The financing is made possible without any cost to taxpayers. Not-for-profit organizations interested in accessing the LDC’s funding opportunities should contact its executive director, Joan Cergol, at 631-351-2847.

 


STATEMENT ON DEPARTMENTAL RESTRUCTURING; SPECIAL TOWN BOARD MEETING CANCELLED


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/17/2012

 
The Town of Huntington issues this statement with respect to departmental restructuring: “There was a productive meeting today with relevant department heads to discuss how, through cooperation and sharing, the Town could realize significant savings in the areas of maintaining Town roads and Town facilities without changing the organizational structure of Town departments. Among the areas identified were centralizing equipment repair, cross utilizing facilities, integrating technology and coordinating back office functions. Teams will begin meeting next week to identify specific programs and savings. There was agreement that the departments can and will move forward together to achieve the similar goals of providing services most efficiently and economically to Town residents. In light of the progress at this meeting and the desire to move forward together, Supervisor Petrone has withdrawn his call of a special Town board meeting to consider governmental reorganization measures. We look forward to continued progress in this important area of Town government.” Attending the meeting were: Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, Highway Superintendent William Naughton, Councilman Eugene Cook, Town Attorney John Leo, Interim Comptroller Andrew Persich and Director of General Services Thom Boccard.

 


Statue Unveiled, Dedicated at Breezy Park


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/10/2012
Author: A,J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone joined family, friends and members of the Cold Spring Harbor Soccer Club August 9 in unveiling a statue of the late Brianna “Breezy” Titcomb at the Town park named in memory of the 13-year-old who was killed by a drunk driver while on vacation with her family in Texas several years ago. The sculpture by artist Michael Alfano was commissioned by Breezy’s parents, Dawn and John Titcomb, and depicts the teen in her soccer uniform, kicking a soccer ball. Massachusetts-based Alfano has several additional works on display on Long Island, including anti-drunk driving sculptures at Farmingdale State College and Eisenhower Park. In his remarks, Supervisor Petrone noted that the sculpture completed the park, which includes two synthetic athletic fields, a practice area, a playground and a comfort station and concession building. The Supervisor said he hoped the sculpture would serve as an inspiration to the youth soccer players who use the park as well as make a statement about the effects drunk drivers can cause. Joining supervisor Petrone at the ceremony were Dawn and John Titcomb, their son, Brett, Cold Spring Harbor Soccer Club president Michael Fleischer and Councilman Mark Mayoka. Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan Berland and Eugene Cook sent their regrets at not being able to attend. Following the ceremony, several teammates and friends of Brianna participated in a scrimmage in her memory. Breezy Park was built on the site of the former Mohlenhoff property. The property originally was slated to become a bus depot and repair yard for the South Huntington School District. But thanks to dedicated and caring residents and a tireless effort by the Cold Spring Harbor Soccer Club leadership, the Huntington Town Board was able to acquire the property in partnership with Suffolk County through its Open Space Preservation Program. It was the Cold Spring Harbor Soccer Club’s idea to name the new park in honor and memory of Brianna. The park was constructed with a combination of Town funds and a $1 million private donation from Joe and Nikki Gregory.


 


Bay Constables Charge Connecticut Man with BWI


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/9/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Quick action by two Huntington Town Bay Constables resulted in the boating while intoxicated arrest of a Connecticut man who had been operating his 34-foot boat at an unsafe and imprudent speed and traveling on the wrong side of the channel. At about 9:43 p.m. on Wednesday, August 8, Bay Constables Frederick Uvena and Ian Richard observed the vessel, a 34-foot SeaRay Sundancer , leaving Huntington Harbor in a manner that presented a possible collision situation because of the speed and the failure to travel on the correct side of the channel. Bay Constables Uvena and Richard stopped the boat and interviewed the operator, Mark Cavalieri, 51, of Stamford, CT. They noticed that Cavalieri had glassy and bloodshot eyes. His speech was slow and slurred, he was unsteady on his feet and his breath smelled of an alcoholic beverage. When asked for his vessel registration, Cavalieri could not understand simple commands. Bay Constables Uvena and Richard brought the vessel to the north Town Dock, where the Suffolk County Police Department Marine Bureau assisted in securing the boat and administering a sobriety test, which Cavalieri failed. Cavalieri was taken to the Second Precinct stationhouse, where he was charged with Operating a Vessel While Intoxicated (a violation of New York State Navigation Law) and issued a summons for imprudent operation of a vessel, a violation of Huntington Town Code. “This arrest underscores the vital role our Bay Constables play in keeping Huntington waters safe,” Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “I commend Bay Constables Uvena and Richard for taking action to eliminate a potentially dangerous situation.” Cavalieri was held overnight for processing. The Bay Constables impounded the boat. The passengers on the boat, all Connecticut residents, were told to find alternate transportation home.

 


Huntington @ Your Service Adds "Missing Manhole Cover" Category


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/9/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
In response to Highway Superintendent William Naughton bringing the situation to the public's attention, the Town has added a new “Missing Manhole Cover” category to Huntington @ Your Service, the Town’s web-based citizen request management system. In particular, this will allow users of smart phones with the H@YS app to take a picture of a structure missing a manhole cover and send it to the Town. The GPS function on the phone will precisely locate where a replacement cover is needed.

 


Boaters Pack Town Board Room for Safety forum


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/8/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Boaters packed the Town Hall meeting room Tuesday, August 7, as the Huntington held a Boating Safety forum to discuss what to do and what not to do when viewing events such as fireworks displays that attract large numbers of vessels. The forum, which included presentations from the Huntington Harbormaster’s Office, the U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, the Neptune Power Squadron, the Centerport and Northport Fire Departments and the Suffolk County Police Department’s Marine Bureau, was prompted by the July 4 tragedy in which three children died when the boat they were on watching a fireworks display in Oyster Bay Cove overturned and sank. The parents of one of those children, 8-year-old Victoria Gaines, attended the forum. Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, who was joined by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson in presenting the forum, made reference to the tragedy in his opening remarks as he stressed the need to move forward with possible boating safety legislation and sessions such as the forum to promote safe boating. Supervisor Petrone and Councilman Cuthbertson noted that one impetus for the event was the Huntington Lighthouse Preservation Society’s upcoming Music Festival over Labor Day weekend, an event that draws hundreds of boats to the Lighthouse in Huntington Bay. The Huntington Lighthouse Preservation Society was a cosponsor of the event, along with the Greater Huntington Council of Yacht and Boating Clubs. The presentations covered topics such as Know Your Boat, Preparing to Get Underway, Emergencies on Board, Assisting in Emergencies and Search and Rescue, Weather and Communication. Attendees were given a fact sheet with helpful hints covered in the forum. The hints can be viewed and downloaded on the Town’s website using the link http://huntingtonny.gov/permit_pics/1423.pdf. The forum, which was moderated by Senior Harbormaster Harry Acker, was recorded for broadcast on the Town’s government access television channels and on the Town’s website.


 


Town Bay Constables Help Save A Boater's Life


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/6/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Quick action by two Huntington Bay Constables helped save the life of a boater who had gone into diabetic shock in Huntington Harbor on Sunday, August 5. At about 5:20 p.m., the Bay Constables, Fred Uvena and Tim Lutz, responded to a call that was initially described as a suspected boating while intoxicated case when the 47-foot Catalina sailboat Mary Anne Mae collided with an anchored vessel. Bay Constable Uvena boarded the Mary Anne Mae and found the operator, a 54-year-old man, disoriented and combative. Bay Constable Uvena determined that the situation was not one of intoxication but rather someone who needed treatment for a diabetes-related incident. He was able to restrain the boater, secure a personal flotation device (life jacket) on him and begin treatment. When the boater lost consciousness, Bay Constable Uvena secured an airway and requested an oxygen kit from Bay Constable Lutz. A Suffolk County Police Department marine bureau officer, Charles Marchiello, who had been called to the scene, boarded the Mary Anne Mae with Bay Constable Lutz and assisted Bay Constable Uvena in administering oxygen while an ambulance was called. Dave Willis of Willis Marine also boarded the Mary Anne Mae and piloted it to the pickup point near the Halesite Firehouse, where a Halesite Fire Department ambulance picked up the boater and transported him to Huntington Hospital. They were also assisted on shore by Bay Constable Stephen Taylor. By 6:20 p.m., when Bay Constables Uvena and Taylor went to the hospital to retrieve the rescue gear, the boater was conscious, resting comfortably and able to give a narrative of what he remembered of the incident. “I commend Bay Constables Uvena and Lutz, as well as Police Officer Marchiello and Mr. Willis for their prompt response to the situation and for the correct assessment of the situation that resulted in the actions that saved this boater’s life,” Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “All of us in Town government are especially proud of how our Harbormaster’s office continues to keep our waters safe and help boaters in need.”

 


Town Board Sets Aug. 14 Hearings on Consolidation Measures


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/25/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board has set Aug. 14 for public hearings on three proposals aimed at streamlining Town government and making it more efficient and accountable by converting the job of highway superintendent to an appointive, rather than elective, position and consolidating the general services department into a to-be-created department of public works. If, after the public hearings, the Town Board decides to go ahead with the measures, voters will be asked to approve the change in the highway superintendent’s status in a referendum as part of the Nov. 6 general election. The two other measures do not require voter approval. If approved by the voters, the change would take effect Jan. 1 2014, after the end of the highway superintendent’s current term. “Increasingly, Towns across the state are approving these measures, as they look to save taxpayer dollars in difficult economic times,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “Making the highway function accountable to the Town Board and consolidating departments with similar functions should produce savings in personnel and equipment costs and eliminate duplication, allow for more efficient scheduling and reduce the need to engage outside contractors for some work.” “We are proposing these measures now so that the question of eliminating the elected highway superintendent can be put to the voters in a presidential election year, when voter participation is greatest,” Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. “We encourage Town voters to participate in the debate between now and Election Day and then to cast their ballot. I am confident that when voters weigh the issues, they will conclude that this change is necessary to hold down taxes and make government more responsive to their needs.” “When issues arise, voters come to the Town Board with their problems. Making the highway function accountable to the Town Board will help the board solve those problems more quickly and economically, especially if the situation can be addressed by a single department,” Councilwoman Susan Berland said. “I encourage residents to attend the public hearing or send us an e-mail with their views.” The Town is conducting a detailed analysis to pinpoint potential savings. Among the State’s 50 largest Towns, 40 percent have already changed the status of highway superintendent to an appointive office. The Brookhaven Town Board last week set hearings next month on three similar resolutions, and voters in upstate Ossining will be asked to approve the change in a November referendum. The public hearings will be held at 7 p.m., in the Town Board meeting room. In other action, the Town Board: -- authorized an agreement with a consortium that includes the Town of Huntington Economic Development Corp., the Huntington Village Business Improvement District, the Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce and The Paramount Theater to share in the cost of hiring a consultant to conduct a parking study of Huntington Village. The $43,530 study will be conducted by the New York City firm Nelson Nygaard. The Town’s share of the cost is $7,906. -- approved a contract for construction of a fish guard at the Heckscher Park Pond spillway. Installation of the fish guard is a precursor to stocking the pond with grass carp in an effort to control submerged vegetation growth that is severely impairing recreational use of the pond. -- approved a $962,000 contract with Structural Preservation Systems Inc. for rehabilitation of the South Parking Garage at the Huntington Long Island Rail Road station. The work will include structural concrete repairs; removal and replacement of deteriorated concrete surfaces; installation of new expansion joints and stair treat concrete repairs. -- authorized the Supervisor to apply for, and receive, $460,075 from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, as part of its regional Economic Development and Greenhouse Gas Reduction Grant Program, for the design and construction of a 65kW Micro Turbine for Combined heat and Power at the Huntington Sewage Treatment Plant. The turbine will run on a blend of methane gas, a byproduct of the sewage treatment process, and natural gas. The electricity generated by the turbine will reduce the sewer district’s demand for electricity and save on heating costs. The Town will be required to contribute one-fourth of the cost of the project, or $153,359. -- adopted the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s “Climate Smart Communities Pledge” for a coordinated local, state and national response to climate change. Also taking part in the pledge are Babylon, Brookhaven, Islip and Smithtown. This program is allied in purpose with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Challenge, in which the Town is also participating. -- took action on two Huntington Station houses to be rehabilitated by Housing Help. Inc. and sold as affordable housing under the Take Back the Blocks program. One measure allows the Town to purchase for $35,179.61 the property at 61 Norwich St. Suffolk County seized in a tax foreclosure and sell it to Housing Help for the same price. Housing Help purchased the second property, at 126 E. 10th St., for $150,000, and will use a $120,000 loan from the Town’s Municipal Housing Development Fund to finance the necessary renovations. The loan, which will carry a one percent interest rate, has a term of 18 months. -- approved a contract with Emergency Communications Network (CODERED) as the provider for the Town’s Huntington Alert emergency notification system. In a separate resolution, the Town Board approved the Town’s updated Emergency Operations Plan. -- passed resolutions declaring Sept. 11 as Patriot Day and Oct. 27 as Pit Bull Awareness Day (as part of October becoming Adopt a Shelter Dog Month).

 


Petrone Honors Police Officer, Fire Chief for Saving a Life


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/25/2012

 
At the July 24 Town Board meeting, Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and the Town Board honored a Suffolk County police officer and a Huntington fire chief for saving the life of an 84-year-old woman from a fire in her apartment. Shortly before 9 o’clock on the evening of June 15, the fire broke out in the woman’s apartment at the Nathan Hale Apartment Complex on Nathan Hale Drive in Huntington village. Both the Suffolk County Police and Huntington Fire Department were called to the scene. Huntington Fire Chief Ken Cochrane and Suffolk Police Officer Joseph Lanzisera learned from a neighbor that a woman was inside the smoke-filled, first-floor apartment. When they tried to get in, they found that the door was locked with a dead bolt. Lanzisera broke a side window and climbed in. He found the woman sitting in a chair in her bedroom, covered in black soot and not responsive. Lanzisera moved through the smoke-filled hallway and unlocked the door to let Cochrane in. Together, they carried her though the dense smoke and out of the apartment to safety. The woman suffered second-degree burns to her face and hair. Lanzisera suffered smoke inhalation. The proclamations Supervisor Petrone and the Town Board presented to Lanzisera and Cochrane noted how they both selflessly acted without regard for their own personal safety to help an injured person, upholding high standards of service and dedication to the citizens of Huntington.


 


NOTICE ABOUT PARKING IN ELM STREET MUNICIPAL LOT ON JULY 25


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/24/2012

 
Under an agreement between the Town and the company producing the music competition television show The Next, 30 parking spots in the Elm Street Municipal Lot will be blocked off from 6 a.m. to midnight on Wednesday, July 25, 2012 to allow for taping of an episode at The Paramount. The production company, as part of its license agreement, also will be allowed to secure several parking spaces on Elm Street to allow large trucks to enter and exit the alleyway behind The Paramount. The spots will again be available to the public at 12:01 a.m. July 26.

 


Huntington to Host Boating Safety Forum


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/24/2012

 
Against the backdrop of a recent tragedy in which three children died when a boat capsized after July 4 fireworks show in Oyster Bay Harbor, Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilman Mark Cuthbertson announce that the Town, in partnership with law enforcement, village government and boating groups, will hold a boating safety forum at Town Hall on August 7. The one-hour forum, which will be held in the Town Board meeting room at Town Hall, 100 Main Street, beginning at 7:30 p.m. is designed to educate and prepare members of the boating community for the real life experiences they may face while out in the water. It is being held in partnership with the Huntington Lighthouse Preservation Society, the Greater Huntington Council of Yacht & Boating Clubs, the Huntington Harbormaster’s Office, the United States Coast Guard and Auxiliary, the Suffolk County Police Marine Division, Neptune Power Squadron, local fire departments and Incorporated Villages. Topics will include Weather & Communication, Vessel Preparation, Emergencies and Search & Rescue scenarios. “This recent tragedy serves as an unfortunate reminder that events such as fireworks displays that attract large numbers of boaters present different challenges in navigating the waters around Long Island,” Supervisor Petrone said. “We hope that this forum will serve as a refresher for boaters, reminding them of what to look out for, what to do and what not to do when our harbors and bays experience congestion due to events.” “This seminar includes input from, government, law enforcement and boating groups, all of whom will present vital information demonstrating how to enjoy our waters safely and what to do if and when an emergency strikes. I encourage all boaters to take advantage of this unique opportunity to hear from experts and to have questions answered,” Councilman Cuthbertson said. “The Huntington Lighthouse Society’s scheduled music festival celebrating the lighthouse’s 100th birthday promises to attract crowds of boaters over Labor Day Weekend. Anyone planning to watch that display from their boat should take note of the advice this forum will offer to help them navigate to and from the event safely,” Councilwoman Susan Berland said. Because space is limited, persons wishing to attend are asked to pre-register by calling the Huntington Harbormaster’s Office at 631-351-3192 or via email to Maritime@HuntingtonNY.gov The Town also plans to record the seminar for rebroadcast on the Town’s government access television channels and for viewing on the town’s website.

 


Plans Are Underway for 3rd Annual Huntington Awareness Day


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/23/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Mark Sept. 22nd on the calendar for the Third Annual Huntington Awareness Day, which includes a parade through Huntington Station and a fair that celebrates the community’s unity, diversity and solidarity. In celebrating Huntington Station’s continuing revitalization, the parade will take special notice of the Rosen family, which has been a force in the local business community since 1982. The family’s continuing investments in the community have helped spark Huntington Station’s rebirth, including the office building that houses the Huntington Station branch of the Huntington Public Library, the 7-Eleven adjacent to that building and the recently opened Station Sports entertainment complex on Depot Road. Brad Rosen, who is treasurer of the Huntington Station Business Improvement District, will represent his father, Robert, and other family members as grand marshal. “Bob, Brad and the entire Rosen family deserve this honor, and I hope that residents will line the parade route to thank them for all that they have done,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “I also hope everyone will join us at the festival to celebrate the great community we call our home and to have some fun.” The Town is one of the sponsors of the event and the Supervisor is one of the event co-chairs. Once again, bands, floats, vintage cars, service groups and local merchants will join the march through Huntington Station from West Hills Road to Church Street, ending at the fair in the municipal parking lot between Railroad Street and Church Street. The fair will include performances by local artists, a participatory chalk art activity and booths offering crafts and services. Local restaurants will be on hand to sell food. The starting time for the parade has been changed to 11 a.m. to encourage more spectator participation. The fair will run through 5 p.m. The parade and fair are organized by the Huntington Awareness Community Partnership. “We continue to look for sponsors and, of course, we will gratefully accept donations to help us keep all events and rides free of charge,” said co-chair Dolores Thompson. “That way, everyone in the community can enjoy this special day. But we are particularly looking for vendors: people who want to sell arts and crafts, artwork, jewelry, fashion merchandise and other items that might be of interest to fairgoers.” Persons can obtain details about sponsorship or parade participation and download the necessary forms at the website, www.huntingtonawareness.org. Those interested in becoming a parade sponsor, entering a float in the parade or reserving vendor space can also contact Dolores Thompson either by calling her at 631-425-2640 or by sending an e-mail to huntsec@aol.com

 


Swim Lessons Moved from Asharoken Beach to Crab Meadow


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/19/2012

 
The Suffolk County Department of Health Services has temporarily closed Asharoken Beach for swimming due to water quality issues. As a result, swim lessons will be held at Crab Meadow Beach until the County has deemed the water quality safe to reopen Asharoken Beach for swimming. The same beach parking passes that are accepted at Asharoken Beach will be honored at Crab Meadow Beach.

 


Huntington Maintains AAA Bond Rating


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/11/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Recognizing the way the Town has managed its budget during difficult financial times and expressing confidence in the Town’s ability to continue its prudent fiscal policies, three major rating agencies have upheld the Town’s AAA bond rating. The ratings by Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s and Fitch Ratings apply to both the Town’s $114 million in outstanding debt and to $7.6 million in bonds, mostly for highway projects, the Town offered for sale today. Because of the AAA ratings, the bonds sold at the favorable interest rate of 2.23 percent, even lower than the 2.82 rate for the bonds sold in 2011. Key to all three agencies’ ratings was the confidence expressed about the Town’s continuing ability to manage through difficult economic circumstances, both in the past and going forward.. In speaking about its stable outlook for the Town, Standard & Poor’s wrote, “The stable outlook reflects Standard & Poor's opinion of the Town's location and participation in the diverse and stable local and regional employment bases. The stable outlook also reflects our opinion of management's ability to manage near-term budgetary challenges brought on by declines in the economically sensitive revenue stream while maintaining historically strong reserves. For these reasons, it is unlikely we will change the rating within the stable outlook's two-year parameter.” Fitch Ratings wrote, “Strong financial management practices, including conservative budgeting and demonstrated ability to control expenditures combined with a mature and stable tax base have enabled the Town to maintain strong reserve levels and overall financial flexibility.” Moody’s said its rating “reflects the Town's solid financial position with currently healthy reserves, wealthy tax base that is expected to experience slowed growth given softening of the residential real estate market, and low debt burden with a manageable capital program.” "The bond agencies' ratings validate the way I have managed Town finances since becoming supervisor 19 years ago,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “We have reduced the amount of the budget devoted to debt service, controlled spending, held taxes down and put together spending plans that look beyond the current year. As the rating agencies note, the Town continues to manage its finances conservatively, both currently and looking ahead, by making the tough decisions while at the same time maintaining vital and desired services." Among the highlights of the Town’s fiscal policies are cutting spending in each of the last three years, reducing staffing to its lowest level since 1996, and freezing or reducing the general fund tax rate. The percentage of the Town budget devoted to debt service is low, about 8 percent. Additionally, as the ratings agencies noted, the Town only borrows to finance infrastructure improvements, retires most debt within 10 years and has a policy of retiring more debt than it incurs in a given year. "Management did conservatively budget for expenses finishing the year under budget, largely driven by employee benefits and salaries, which came in under budget by $1 million,” Moody’s noted. “On an Operating Fund basis (General, Refuse and Garbage, Town Outside Village, Highway and Debt Service Funds) the Town finished fiscal 2011 with a slight operating surplus of $318,000, the first increase in four years." The rating agencies also noted that he Town ended the year with $14.2 million in unrestricted fund balance -- 16 percent of spending. The agencies like to be at least 10 percent. How difficult was the managing the budget in difficult economic times? Moody’s, in its ratings report, described the Town’s financial flexibility as “stressed” because of declines in “economically sensitive revenues” such as the mortgage recording tax and because of a projected significant budget gap next year. The agencies also noted that the Town had tapped into reserve funds to meet expenses in past few years, although less in 2012 than in previous years. But the rating agencies also expressed confidence in the town’s ability to deal with the economic stresses. “Management reports the Town is actively looking at ways to close the gap,” Standard & Poor’s noted. Fitch wrote, “Fitch Ratings expects that management will control expenditures or raise recurring revenues to maintain healthy fund balances consistent with the rating category.” “These decisions by the rating agencies directly refute those who have said the Town is facing a fiscal crisis. The ratings show that both in the past and looking forward, the Town’s finances are in good order and in good hands,” Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. Councilwoman Susan Berland said, “A government should be judged by how it responds in difficult times. As the reports from the rating agencies show, this government has risen to the challenge of difficult economic times by making the hard decisions that hold down taxes and maintain services while keeping the Town on sound financial footing. We are pleased that the recognition of these efforts -- maintaining our AAA bond rating – will hold down debt service costs for years to come.”

 


Town Acts on Fishing Boat That Sank in Huntington Harbor


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/9/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Town of Huntington has issued three summonses to the owner of a fishing boat that sank last week in Huntington Harbor and has been working with the owner on the removal of the vessel while containing any possible environmental damage. The 56-foot Noli Eileen sank last week, despite efforts of Town Bay Constables to keep it afloat. The reason for the sinking is under investigation. At the time of the sinking, the owner of the boat, Peter Gens of Kings Park, reported that it contained hydraulic oil and fuel estimated to total about 15 gallons. To contain any possible spill, the Bay Constables put an absorbent boom around the boat and have been monitoring the boom during each shift. On July 5, the Bay Constables issued three summonses -- for pollution of waterways, unseaworthy vessel and an expired mooring permit -- and a notice of violation requiring the owner to correct the situation within three days. The Town has also notified the U.S. Coast Guard and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Today, Senior Harbormaster Harry Acker spoke with the attorney for the owner about its removal from the Harbor. Should those discussions prove unsuccessful, the Town will consider removing the boat and seeking reimbursement from the owner. The boat, once a popular fishing vessel, has been moored in Huntington for several years. It is believed that it has not carried passengers since 2008.

 


NOTICE ABOUT PARKING FOR JULY 4 ASHAROKEN FIREWORKS DISPLAY


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/3/2012

 
Persons wishing to view the Village of Asharoken’s July 4 fireworks display should note that parking at the Town of Huntington’s Crab Meadow Beach will be limited to Town residents only. Once the Crab Meadow parking lot is full, traffic will be diverted at the intersection of Waterside Road and Eatons Neck Road. Additionally, Waterside Road will be shut at West Street. The Town expects the parking lot to be full by 8 p.m. Look for the electronic signs, including one at the intersection of Route 25A and Waterside, that will notify motorists if the parking lot is full.

 


Huntington Names Winners of 2012 Beautification Awards


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/22/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board and the Huntington Beautification Council joined June 19 to honor homeowners, businesses groups, organizations and schools in presenting the 36th Annual Beautification Awards. The awards are given to persons, businesses and groups that have carried out projects which improve the appearance of the Town of Huntington and to schools that implement projects with the same goal. The 2012 winners are: Residential: Steve Charron, or 48 Woolsey St., Huntington. Residential Renovation: Patricia McDonnell, 16 Clive Pl., East Northport. Professional Office: Drs. Roberta and Robin Araujo, 33 Fairview St., Huntington. Small Business: LTP, Inc., 16 Park Circle, Centerport. Commercial: Bottles and Cases, 99 East Main St., Huntington. Civic: Main Street Nursery & Florist, for planting and maintaining the Gerard Street roundabout in Huntington Village. Community Service: Story Arts Inc. and Long Island Community Agricultural Network, for the murals at the Town’s Gateway Community Garden in Huntington Station. Primary School: Washington Drive Primary School, Harborfields District, for their Juice Pouch Brigade program. Students collected empty juice pouches and sent them to a company that turned them into cool-looking bags and pencil cases. The school receives two cents for each juice pouch; so far, more than 25,000 pouches have been collected. The program is further described on the company’s website, www.terracycle.net. Elementary School: Norwood Avenue Elementary School, Northport-East Northport District, for their Lasagna Garden program. Students gathered materials which would have been discarded or had been recycled, including leaves, newspapers and straw from Halloween decorations. Using composite recycled boards, the students created frames for gardens and layered the discarded materials, lasagna-style. They planted pumpkin seeds and strawberry runners. The project demonstrated plant life cycles, the science of composting, the effectiveness of recycling and the value of cooperation. Intermediate School: James H. Boyd Intermediate School, Elwood District, for their Seasonal Garden program. Their Courtyard Butterfly and Reading Gardens include plants and flowers that attract butterflies and a pond with koi fish to educate and inspire students to develop a scientific mind about plants, animals and ecosystems. School: Lloyd Harbor School and Cold Spring Harbor Junior/Senior High School, Cold Spring Harbor District for their Cool Earth program. The Lloyd Harbor school was attracted by the “cool the earth” program, which is designed to educate kids and families about climate change and then follow through by taking simple, measurable actions at home to reduce carbon emissions. The classes at Lloyd Harbor School went to the junior/senior high school and convinced them to put on a school-wide assembly program featuring a lovable polar bear named Koda who took on the villain, Mr. Carbon. The play ends with the students accepting action cards, going back to their classrooms and homes and carrying out projects which will aid in cooling the earth. The Beautification Council, a citizen’s advisory committee appointed by the Town Board, is chaired by Dr. William T. Walter. It includes Pat Feder, Sandy Prior, Nancy Schumann, Diane Thurer, Molly Wang and Anne Wesp, who serves as vice chair. They invite additional members. Interested persons should contact Dr. Walter at lcinc@pb.net.


 


Town Approves Rezoning for Affordable Senior Housing


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/21/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its June 19 meeting, approved a rezoning that allows implementation of an innovative arrangement that allows the purchase of Meyers Farm in to create Sweet Hollow Park and the construction of 260 units of affordable senior housing and a temple on what is now an industrial parcel in Melville. “This is a win-win-win, giving the community a park it has sought for many years, creating much-needed affordable housing for seniors and allowing construction of a house of worship for a group that has been trying to build one for quite some time,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “Bringing this all together took a lot of dedication and hard work by the Town, community representatives, the religious leaders and the business community, but it was well worth the effort, given the result.” The formal steps to implement the proposal began in March, when the Town Board authorized the purchase of the 8.1-acre former Meyers Farm on Round Swamp Road, for a price not to exceed $1.325 million, from Bochasanwasi Shree Akshar Purushottam-Northeast (BAPS). As recommended by the Town’s EOSPA Committee, the Town envisions developing three acres for active recreational use and holding five acres as passive parkland. Under the agreement approved June 19, the development rights for the five acres to be used as passive parkland are transferred to five acres of the 18-acre site on Deshon Drive that had been used by Newsday as a preprint distribution warehouse and for its business operations. The Town Board changed the zoning on the 18-acre parcel from I1 Industrial to 3M Garden apartment, a classification that would allow construction of 261 units of housing. The agreement allows clustering that housing on 13 of the acres. The remaining five acres will be sold to BAPS, which, using the development rights transferred from the Meyers Farm property it is selling to the Town, will be able to build its temple there. Deshon Partners LLC, the developer of the former Newsday site, has committed that the 261-unit project will be entirely for affordable senior housing, including a covenant that all of the units will remain income restricted (affordable) in perpetuity. The Meyers Farm sales price reflects the property’s decreased value because of the transfer of the development rights. The vote on the proposal was 4-1. Supervisor Petrone, who sponsored the resolution, was joined by Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan Berland and Mark Mayoka. Councilman Eugene Cook vote against the plan. In other action, the Town Board: -- gave the necessary approval for the “Art Around Town” program, authorizing the Supervisor to execute no-cost agreements with artists and property owners under which works of art will be on temporary display in vacant storefronts. The program is part of the 2012 Public Art Plan approved by the Town Board in December. In May, a selection panel from the Town’s Public Art Advisory Committee, evaluating responses to a request for proposals, pre-qualified 21 artists for participation in the program. -- approved a contract with former New York Islander Benoit Hogue to oversee the summer hockey camp at the Town’s Dix Hills Ice Rink. -- authorized spending up to $128,000 from the Town’s Environmental Open Space and Park Improvement and the Neighborhood Park Funds to enhance handicapped accessibility at the Dix Hills Park pool by enlarging and improving the handicapped parking area, replacing fencing and installing a concrete floor in the tent area. -- voted to endorse the North Shore Land Alliance’s application for a $500,000 New York State Environmental Protection Fund grant to help finance its share of the cost of purchasing the DeForest Williams Estate in Cold Spring Harbor. The Town, Suffolk County and the Alliance are acquiring the estate as a partnership in which the County is to incur 50 percent of the cost and the Town and the Alliance 25 percent each.

 


Town Wins Case Against Absentee Landlord


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/20/2012

 
Acting on a case brought by the Town of Huntington against an absentee landlord, a Suffolk County District Court judge has ordered that an illegal multi-family dwelling in East Northport be restored to its single-family state and appointed a receiver to ensure that the restoration occurs. Judge C. Stephen Hackeling’s June 14 order came after a two-day trial during which the Town proved that Vincent Piemonte had violated Town code by illegally converting 172 Vernon Valley Road into a multi-family residence and that he had been collecting rent from multiple tenants. Judge Hackeling sentenced Piemonte to a conditional discharge – the condition being that the house be restored to a single family residence and that it be brought into compliance with all Town codes. Judge Hackeling appointed Randy J. Schaefer, an attorney with the law firm Silverman & Associates in Jericho, as receiver. Schaefer will have the authority to collect and hold the rents from the tenants while making sure that the house is brought into compliance with Town codes. Schaeffer also is empowered to begin eviction proceedings against any tenants behind in their payments or with expired leases. Having the receiver collect and hold the rents removes any incentive Piemonte might have to delay the conversion. If Piemonte does not restore the house on his own, Schaeffer can ask the Town to advance the funding for the restoration, with the cost tacked on the property tax bill. “This is an important decision that should send a message to all absentee landlords with illegal multi-family rentals that the Town will prosecute them to the fullest extent of the law and that the Courts will act aggressively. I commend Judge Hackeling for his strong decision and action,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said.

 


Huntington @ Your Service Resumes Operation


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/19/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington @ Your Service, the Town's citizen request management system, resumed operation this morning after technical issues that kept the system down for the past few days were resolved. Residents are encouraged to use Huntington @ Your Service, either on-line or from their smart phones, to obtain information or to contact the Town with requests.


 


Huntington @ Your Service Unavailable


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/15/2012

 
Due to technical difficulties, Huntington @ Your Service, the Town’s citizen request management system, is unavailable. We apologize for this inconvenience. The issues that caused this disruption are being addressed and we hope to have the system working soon. Until then, try using the search function of the Town’s website if you are seeking information. If you need to file an urgent service request, call 631-365-6834.


 


Senior Beach House Now Open on Saturdays


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/11/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Centerport, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone announces that the Senior Beach House at the Town’s Centerport Beach will be open on Saturdays for the 2012 beach season. The historic building – the first farmhouse in the area, erected circa 1782 and purchased by the Town in 1963 – has been used by the Town’s senior division since 1963 and has been open six days a week during the beach season. This is the first time, at least in recent memory, that is has been open on Saturdays. “The Senior Beach House is one of the Town’s treasures, and opening on Saturdays will allow our seniors one more day to relax there and enjoy the season,” Supervisor Petrone said. More than 100 seniors attended the June 9 opening and cake ceremony on the porch of the Beach House. The Beach House is adjacent to the Town’s senior beach. It includes a porch, meeting rooms, card rooms, a television room, and, outdoors, bocce courts and a pavilion. Seniors can purchase light refreshments. The Town also runs varied programs at the Beach House and at the adjacent cottage on weekdays. It is open from noon to 5 p.m. on Sundays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. the remainder of the week.


 


Special Vietnam War Remembrance Marks Huntington Memorial Day Ceremony


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/29/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

Supervisor Petrone, Rep. Israel and Sgt.-at-arms Fred Amore unveil plaque honoring Afghanistan and Iraq veterans
 
Huntington, NY – The Town of Huntington marked Memorial Day with a wreath ceremony that gave special recognition to a group that sent packages to soldiers from Huntington who served in the Vietnam War and unveiled a plaque that honors veterans who served more recently in Afghanistan and Iraq. More than 100 people attended the May 27 solemn ceremony at Veterans Plaza in Town Hall, held annually to remember Huntington residents who died while serving in the military. This year, the ceremony featured a commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the planting of a grove of 43 Kwanzan cherry trees by the group Huntington Women in Support of Our Men in Vietnam. In 1972, the group planted the grove, representing the 43 Huntingtonians who had died in Vietnam to that point in what was the nation’s first living Vietnam memorial. In 2010, the grove was expanded to 49 trees to memorialize soldiers later killed or declared missing in action. Founded in 1966, Women in Support of Our Men in Vietnam continued until the release in 1973 of Huntington’s prisoner of war, Capt. David Baker. All told, more than 400 women participated in the group’s projects. “Each year, we theme this gathering, and we think of something special. This year, it is our veterans in Vietnam and our dear women who took the helm here back home when everyone else turned their back,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said, adding of the Huntington Women in Support of Our Men in Vietnam. “You were courageous back in those days. You were shunned. People looked at you and wanted to know why you were doing this. You can really stand tall today. You don’t have to explain why. You don’t have to explain how you did it. All you have to do is explain why we’re here and how you made that all possible, and we thank you from the bottom our hearts for what you did.” Speaking of Memorial Day, Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said, “It isn’t about soccer tournaments. It isn’t about barbecues. It isn’t about a day off from school. It’s not about names on a wall or pages in a history book. For me, it is about lives that were lost, futures that never were. It is about the fair haired teenager who left his home and his country, never to be heard from again, whether he perished over the skies of the Pacific, in Vietnam, or at the hands of an IED in Afghanistan. For me that’s what Memorial Day is about, lives that were not, and that’s what we remember: people who would have has such successful, productive lives.” Councilwoman Susan A. Berland said, “I implore each and every one of you to take a story of someone you who knew or someone who told you a story about that person, and share it with someone you never shared it with, so that it keeps their memory alive and we can honor them for generations to come by those stories being repeated. Today, we say a prayer and we remember those who are missed, and hopefully share the stories with somebody new and keep the memories alive.” Councilman Mark Mayoka said, “Huntington has a rich history in memorializing and remembering its veterans. It is evidenced by this memorial plaza, it is evidenced by Veterans Park, it is evidenced by what we do and what we are about as Huntingtonians.” Councilman Eugene Cook said, “I am humbled being here, with all you great people. Thank you, thank you, thank you for all your hard work and you help to keep this country free”. Rep. Steve Israel, referring to an observation made to him by former U.S. Sen. Max Cleland, a wounded Vietnam War veteran, said. “Dying for freedom is not the worst thing in the world. Being forgotten for dying for freedom is. The women who organized the Vietnam memorial, they understand it. “ The ceremony also featured remarks from Maureen Myles, one of the founders of the Huntington Women in Support of Our Men in Vietnam and Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Anthony R. Kropp, a Vietnam War veteran who also spoke at a brief ceremony afterward at the memorial on the Village Green, as well as a medley of patriotic songs performed by the Northport Chorale. The ceremony also included the unveiling of the plaque at Veterans Plaza to expressing appreciation for Huntington residents who have served in the Iran and Afghanistan conflicts. The plaque was funded with a grant from Suffolk County obtained with the assistance of County Legis. Steve Stern.


 


Huntington Town Board Approves Refinancing


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/24/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Huntington Town Board, at its May 22 meeting, approved refinancing up to $24 million of Town bonds, a move projected to save the Town an estimated $700,000 in interest costs. The resolution allows the refinancing of bonds issued from 2002 to 2005 to achieve a lower interest rate. The refinancing was recommended by New York Municipal Advisors Corporation, the Town’s fiscal advisor for bonding issues. NYMAC projected the refinancing would save taxpayers an estimated $100,000 a year for the remainder of the life of the bonds, or more than $700,000 overall. The term of the bonds remains unchanged. In 2009, NYMAC recommended a similar refinancing of $13 million of other Town debt that also saved taxpayers about $700,000. “This opportunity reflects both changing market conditions and the benefits of the Town maintaining its strong bond rating,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “We appreciate the efforts of our bond advisor and bond counsel in continuing to identify ways we can save taxpayers money.” The Board’s vote was unanimous. In other action, the Town Board: -- appropriated $535,000 to develop Coral Park in Greenlawn, including a parking area, sidewalk, playground, basketball court, plaza/sitting area with picnic and chess/checker tables, large open lawn/play area and fitness/cardio stations. Plans for the park are being developed with input from the community. The appropriations are coming from the Neighborhood Parks Fund, the EOSPA Park Improvement Fund and the EOSPA Neighborhood Enhancement Program. -- approved a decrease in fees for the Parks and Recreation Department’s evening leisure program and craft workshops to restore them to their 2010 levels. The increase, imposed to more accurately reflect the cost of the programs, resulted in a 70 percent decline in attendance and 50 percent decline in revenues. It is anticipated that the fees generated by increased participation will return revenues to their previous level. -- authorized the Supervisor to execute a license agreement with the Cow Harbor Warriors to use Crab Meadow Beach for a four-mile warrior run and Sunset Clambake on Sept. 8, as part of a weekend of events for members of the military injured in the line of duty. -- repealed Chapter 40 of Town Code, which required the Huntington Housing Authority to file reports with the Town Board. Legal opinions concluded that because the Housing Authority does not report to the Town Board, the requirement was unenforceable. -- appointed Edward A.T. Carr as director of the Department of Maritime Services -- changed the dates of the July, August and December Town Board meetings. The meetings will be held on July 24, August 14 and December 18, all starting at 7 p.m. -- scheduled a June 19 public hearing on a proposal to acquire the Park Avenue Dairy property for parkland.

 


Huntington Supports Tribute to Wounded Veterans


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/22/2012

 
As the nation remembers those who have died in service for our country this Memorial Day Weekend, local resident Rocco Donnino and a team of Northport and Huntington friends and family members will be putting the finishing touches on a personal tribute meant to honor, enable and thank our nation’s wounded heroes. Cow Harbor Warriors, a nonprofit organization founded to honor and enable wounded United States veterans, will sponsor a weekend in early September that will feature various activities including a sunset clam bake gala celebration as an inaugural tribute to Wounded Warrior alumni from New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Members of the Huntington Town Board today fully endorsed and commended Cow Harbor Warriors and pledged the Town’s support in making the weekend of Sept. 7-9 truly memorable for the Wounded Warriors “It is my sincere honor to announce today that the Town of Huntington will provide all necessary resources to support the Cow Harbor Warriors and help fulfill its mission to honor the heroes of the Wounded Warrior Project,” said Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, sponsor of the Town Board resolution authorizing the use of the Town’s Crab Meadow Beach for the clambake and four-mile run. “This three-day event is a fitting tribute to honor, empower and thank our service men and women.” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, whose daughter Julie serves as an officer in the U.S. Air Force, said this year’s founding of the Cow Harbor Warriors is another testament to the generosity and caring of the Huntington community. “The women and men who put their lives on the line to protect our country’s freedom deserve our support during active duty and when they return home from overseas,” Supervisor Petrone said. “We welcome these heroes to our community with open arms and this weekend is a small token of our heartfelt thanks for their courage and service.” The inaugural Cow Harbor Warrior Weekend event is scheduled to take place Friday, September 7 through Sunday September 9 in and around the surrounding area of Northport. Those participating in the event will be feted in a welcoming parade down Main Street, Northport Village, on Friday evening. Following remarks from local dignitaries, the Wounded Warriors and their families will enjoy a dinner at the Northport Volunteer Fire Department. “When men and women join the U.S. military and serve in our Armed Forces, they vow to uphold our Constitution, defend the values it represents and protect all who live under its freedoms,” said Rocco Donnino, president, Cow Harbor Warriors. “This is an opportunity for our community to thank, serve and enable our Wounded Warriors through a weekend of recreational activities and family events, dedicated to those who have given so much of themselves for our freedom.” “Huntington has a long history of supporting those who serve our country bravely and honorably,” Councilwoman Susan Berland said. “I wholeheartedly support Cow Harbor Warriors’ efforts and ask Huntingtonians to join them in helping to make this weekend a success.” Events scheduled for Saturday, September 8 include a four-mile Warrior Run starting at Crab Meadow Beach; a Birdies For The Brave golf tournament at the Veterans Administration Golf Course co-hosted by the Northport American Legion Post #694; a Fishing For Freedom tournament; and adaptive water sports and family beach activities at Steers Beach in Northport. Following the day’s events, participants will enjoy a barbecue lunch hosted by members of the Northport Rotary Club. On Saturday evening, the Cow Harbor Warriors will host a gala sunset clam bake celebration at Crab Meadow Beach. Cow Harbor Warriors was founded in early 2012 with a mission to honor and enable U.S. Veterans who have been wounded in action during Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan or Operation Iraqi Freedom. The organization, a registered 501(c)(3), is working in conjunction with the Wounded Warrior Project by advancing its not-for-profit mission to honor and empower those who have suffered combat-related injuries with direct programs that meet the unique needs of our warriors. “Events like the Cow Harbor Warrior Weekend benefit wounded vets more than people realize,” said James O’Leary, a Warrior Project alumni. “We don’t want to sit on the sidelines; we want to get back in the game. And when communities participate in these activities, it shows that our service meant something and that our sacrifice was appreciated. The Cow Harbor Warrior Weekend definitely gives us something to look forward to and encourages all WWP alumni to advance.” “Over the past two years, Huntington has rallied to help an individual wounded warrior from Huntington, Lt. James Byler,” said Councilman Mark Mayoka. “This is an opportunity to express thanks and support for all those who have been wounded in battle.” Councilman Eugene Cook said, “I encourage everyone to attend the welcoming parade and the weekend festivities to stand alongside our wounded warriors and their families to thank them for the sacrifices that they have made to protect our liberties and freedoms that this great nation offers. These men and women are the true leaders in our Town and we should be honored that they call Huntington home. “ Mr. Donnino said the group is seeking donations and sponsorships for the various events. The group is also selling lawn signs for $20 and T-shirts for $15. For complete details and more information about the weekend event and how to participate, visit www.cowharborwarriors.com.


 


STREET CLOSURES FOR MAY 20 CHARITY RUN


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/18/2012

 
THE FIRST LT. JAMES BYLER CHARITY RUN WILL BE HELD ON SUNDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 20, BEGINNING AND ENDING AT ST. ANTHONY’S HIGH SCHOOL. AS A RESULT, PORTIONS OF WOLF HILL ROAD, PIDGEON HILL ROAD, WINDHAM DRIVE, STAFFORD DRIVE, TEED STREET, SMITH LANE, LONG STREET, POSTER PLACE, LUYSTER STREET, LOWICK PLACE, COE PLACE AND CANDY LANE WILL BE CLOSED FOR PERIODS OF TIME BEGINNING AROUND 2:30.

 


Huntington Joins Better Buildings Energy Challenge


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/11/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its May 8 meeting, voted to accept the U.S. Department of Energy’s invitation to join the federal government’s Better Buildings Energy Challenge partnership. Huntington is the only municipality on Long Island and only one of five in the state to be invited to join the challenge, in which governments pledge to achieve a 20 percent improvement in energy usage by the year 2020. The invitation came as a result of the Town’s innovative use of its $1.725 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant and the breadth of its energy efficiency projects, which included replacing 5,000 street lights with energy efficient fixtures that reduced electricity usage by 59 percent; installing energy efficient lighting and blowers at the Town’s sewage treatment plant, reducing energy use by 15 to 20 percent; various energy upgrades at Town Hall, including a computerized building management system and the installation of solar panels on the Town Hall annex ; and the construction of an electric car charging station at the Huntington Long Island Rail Road Station parking garage, including solar panels whose production will to offset the electricity used by the vehicles being charged. “We are honored to have been selected by the Department of Energy to take part in this challenge and believe participation will serve as an incentive for the town to do even better in its energy consumption, which will save taxpayers dollars and reduce the Town’s carbon footprint,” said Supervisor Frank P. Petrone. Councilman Mark Cuthbertson added, “Huntington has long been at the forefront of the move to reduce energy consumption, including becoming the first Long Island Town to hire a chief sustainability officer, requiring all refuse trucks to operate on compressed natural gas and endorsing other clean energy initiatives. I am sure Huntington will rise to this challenge and set an example for other governments, businesses and residents.” As part of the challenge, Huntington agrees to develop an energy efficiency action plan to implement retrofit projects through 2020 and announce a Showcase Energy Efficiency retrofit project in cooperation with the Department of Energy by the end of next year. Huntington will receive national recognition as a leader in the local energy efficiency movement at the Better Buildings Summit for State and Local Communities scheduled to be held next month in Denver. In other action, the Town Board: -- approved an agreement with the owners of the property at 1130 West Jericho Tpke., Huntington, that requires the owners to continue with the removal of the illegal mulch piles at the property and to reimburse the Town for the costs of the emergency cleanup that the Town began last month. The Board appropriated $250,000 for the cost of the cleanup, for which the Town will be reimbursed when the property is sold. The Town Board has approved a rezoning that will allow construction of a luxury adult community on the site. -- authorized the Supervisor to apply to the State of New York to purchase, for $1, the former Armory building on Fifth Street in Huntington Station. The property will be used for park and recreation purposes. -- approved spending up to $15,000 to purchase and install a fiberglass fish barrier at the spillway at Heckscher Park as part of an aquatic invasive vegetation control effort that will include stocking the Heckscher Park pond with grass carp. In the same resolution, the Board approved $18,000 to design and improve a natural community gathering and children’s play area at Gateway Park. This would be the first such play area in the Town, following the natural classroom concept supported nationally by the Arbor Day Foundation and locally by the Long Island Nature Collaborative for Kids. -- authorized a six-month pilot leash dog walking program at Frazier Park in Greenlawn as part of a community watch effort. -- adopted a home rule message asking the State Legislature and the Governor to approve the legislation necessary to allow creation of a local civil administrative enforcement bureau to adjudicate violations of local laws and Town codes.

 


Greenlawn Skate Park Closed for Repairs


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/9/2012

 
Until further notice, the Greenlawn Skate Park is closed for repairs. Skateboarders are encouraged to use the skate park at Veterans Park on Bellerose Avenue in East Northport. Bikes are NOT allowed at the Veterans Park Skate Park.

 


Huntington Dedicates Restored Colonial-Era Arsenal


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/7/2012

 
With the Ancient & Honorable Huntington Militia firing of a volley from muskets and a cannon, Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and members of the Town Council May 6 dedicated the newly-restored Arsenal, the only known Colonial Arsenal still standing on Long Island. “With this dedication, we are taking the Arsenal to the next step in its history,” Supervisor Petrone said at the ceremony marking the completion of the $179,705 project that replaced a badly deteriorated cedar shingle roof, restored the back half of the building to its Colonial-era condition and provided ADA-compliant access to the building. Built in 1740 to store grain and converted to a residence a few years later, the building was used to store powder, muskets and other military supplies for the Suffolk County Militia beginning in 1775. The Militia, drawn primarily from Huntington residents, drilled regularly on the adjacent Village Green. In August 1776 this arsenal was the distribution point for munitions when the Militia mustered for service in the Battle of Long Island. In 1974, in anticipation of the nation’s bicentennial, the Town of Huntington acquired the Arsenal. The Town restored the front half of the building in the 1970s while the back half continued to be used as a residence until 1986. By 2000, the cedar shingle roof was badly deteriorated. In addition, it was decided that the back half of the building should be restored by removing modern building elements to uncover surviving 18th century fabric and the replacement of missing elements. The project carefully restored the building to its Colonial-era condition, exposing the original frame timbers, ceiling beams, ceiling boards, and floor boards. Also original to the building are the back door into the lean-to section of the building and the box lock mounted on the front exterior door. The Arsenal will be open, by appointment, for tours conducted by Militia volunteers. The volunteers will provide visitors with an explanation of the many original colonial artifacts on display, including typical household furnishings, spinning and weaving equipment, and military equipment. The restoration project was funded by the Town and by a $49,300 historic preservation grant from the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. At the ceremony, Supervisor Petrone thanked Rex Metcalf of the Town’s Historic Preservation Commission and residents Al Kachic and his late wife, Sheila, for working with the Town on the grant application. Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said, “It’s great to see an important cultural and community asset preserved with the hard work of people who care about the great history of our Town of Huntington.” Added Councilwoman Susan A. Berland, “We have fantastic history in our Town and it is great that we can be a part of a Town that celebrates that and makes sure it goes on for generations to come.” Said Councilman Mark Mayoka: “This is what Huntington is all about: preserving and protecting our past so that we have it available for future generations.”


 


Softball Field Named in Honor of Township of Huntington Softball Hall of Fame


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/7/2012

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, joined by members of the Town Council, recently officially renamed Softball Field Number 1 at Mill Dam Park in honor of the Township of Huntington Softball Hall of Fame. Supervisor Petrone and Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan A. Berland and Mark Mayoka participated in the May 6 dedication ceremony, which was attended by many of the Hall’s 114 living members. Founded in 1978, the Hall has played an integral role in promoting softball and sportsmanship and has honored and recognized members of the Huntington community who have supported the growth of the sport. Since its inception, 201 persons have been elected to the Hall of Fame, 87 of whom are deceased. Members of the Hall of Fame have generously supported numerous charities throughout the Town, including the establishment of an educational scholarship to a deserving high school senior. Last September, the Town Board passed a resolution dedicating and naming softball field Number 1 at Mill Dam Park in honor of the Hall of Fame.


 


Huntington Seeks Vietnam Veterans and Members of Women in Support of Our Men in Vietnam for May 27 Ceremony


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/2/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Town of Huntington is looking for members of the group Women in Support of Our Men in Vietnam as well as Huntington combat veterans who received support packages from the group, as the Town gets set to commemorate the group’s creation 40 years ago of the first Vietnam memorial in the United States. “As we pay tribute to those who lost their lives in service of our country, we also wish to honor those who survived and those who provided support from home,” Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “We invite all Vietnam veterans and members of Women in Support of Our Men in Vietnam, as well as their families, to join us at our annual solemn ceremony. We hope they will contact us so they can be properly recognized.” The recognition will be the centerpiece of the town’s annual Memorial Day wreath ceremony on May 27, beginning at 9:30 at Veterans Plaza in from of Town Hall, 100 Main Street. Among those scheduled to attend is Joy Wellman, who founded Women in Support of Our Men in Vietnam and who authored a book, Proudly We Hail, chronicling the group’s formation and contributions, including creating, in 1972, the first living Vietnam memorial in the United States; a grove of 43 Kwanzan cherry trees, representing the 43 Huntingtonians who had died in Vietnam to that point. In 2010, the grove, on the Village Green, was expanded to 49 trees to memorialize soldiers later killed or declared missing in action. Wellman currently lives in Florida. Women in Support of Our Men in Vietnam was founded in 1966 and continued until the release in 1973 of Huntington’s prisoner of war, Capt. David Baker. All told, more than 400 women participated in the group’s projects. Members of the group and Vietnam veterans who received packages from it are asked to call Carol Rocco, the Town’s coordinator of veteran’s services, at 631-351-3012.

 


Petrone, Cuthbertson Mark Huntington's Tree City USA Status


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/1/2012

 
Huntington Station, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilman Mark Cuthbertson recently marked the Town’s Tree City USA designation by planting four trees at the Town’s Breezy Park. Recently, after a year-long effort, sponsored by Supervisor Petrone and Councilman Cuthbertson. Huntington regained its Tree City USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation. To qualify for Tree City USA designation, communities must meet standards established by the Arbor Day Foundation and the National Association of State Foresters. Nationally, there are more than 3,400 communities with the designation, including 99 in New York State 17 others on Long Island. Obtaining Tree City USA designation was part of the Green Huntington tree management and planting program initiative that is an important element of the Town’s Comprehensive Plan. This program entails enlisting both public and private support; updating and extending the inventory of trees to all properties owned and managed by the Town; enhancing tree planting and maintenance of town landscapes (streets, parks, and other public places); initiating partnerships with community organizations, institutions, and other groups to promote tree planting on non town-owned properties; working with public utilities to minimize potential damage to trees in proximity to overhead and underground utility lines; and establishing tree planting and maintenance guidelines for public places and private properties Councilwoman Susan Berland joined her colleagues in the Arbor Day-themed event, which also included representatives from the Huntington School Distirct’s Jefferson Primary School, the South Huntington School District;s Oakwood Primary School. The Cold Spring Harbor Soccer Club, the Huntington Village Lacrosse Club and John and Dawn Titcomb, parents of the late Brianna (Breezy) Titcomb, after whom the Town park is named. The planting also marked the start of Huntington’s landscaping effort at Breezy Park, an active recreation area where many people will have a chance to appreciate and experience the Town’s greenery. Two of the trees were donated by Conrad Decker of Decker’s Nursery in Greenlawn.


 


Town Unveils Interpretive Marker at Old Burying Ground


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/25/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone and members of the Town Council, joined by representatives from the Town’s African-American Historic Designation Council and Historic Preservation Commission and the Huntington Historical Society, recently unveiled a new interpretive marker at the Old Burying Ground, one of the most historic and sacred sites in the Town. Located on Main Street in Huntington Village, the Old Burying Ground, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is also a locally designated historic landmark, within the Old Town Hall Historic District. Over the course of 300 years, from the first European settlement of the town in the mid-seventeenth century until 1957, as many as 6,000 to 8,000 people may have been buried there. Only 1,250 markers remain. During the American Revolution, British troops built a fort at the top, damaging many of the gravestones. After it ceased to be used as the Town’s main cemetery, the Old Burying Ground was neglected, resulting in an overgrowth of trees that caused widespread damage. The local chapters of the Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution began cleanup efforts in 1911. The Town assumed regular maintenance starting in the 1920s. Vandalism increased during and after the suburban population boom of the 1950s. The Town, with matching funds from the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, committed itself to the conservation, restoration and preservation of the Old Burying Ground and undertook a multi-year restoration project starting in 2004. Beginning in 2010, the Town’s African American Historic Designation Council has sponsored semi-annual tours of the burying ground highlighting the African American aspect of its history. It is estimated that about four hundred African Americans, whose graves are interspersed evenly among the majority of European Americans, are buried here. That includes the first recorded African American resident of Huntington, who was enslaved in Africa, brought to Huntington in 1657 and died in 1690. As an outgrowth of those tours, the AAHDC suggested the Town place a detailed historic marker at the site to explain its history. The marker describes the history of the Old Burying Ground and includes a section entitled, “The African American Connection.”


 


Huntington Opens Electric Vehicle Charging Station


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/23/2012

(l-r): Councilwoman Susan Berland, Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, Councilman Mark Mayoka, Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, EmPower Solar CEO David Schieren, LIRR director of parking Scott Howell.
 
Huntington Station, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, Councilman Mark Cuthbertson and members of the Town Council today marked the opening of a five-vehicle electric charging station at the Huntington train station’s South Parking Garage, the first such charging station at a municipal parking facility on Long Island. The charging station not only encourages residents to purchase and use electric cars by giving them a place to charge the vehicles while they are at work, it is energy neutral. The electricity consumed by the cars is offset by the electricity produced by solar panels installed on the roof of the Town-owned parking garage as part of the project, so, in essence, the vehicles are powered by the sun. “With Earth Day having been celebrated yesterday, this is a fitting time to open latest example of the Town's commitment to the environment and to clean, sustainable energy,” Supervisor Petrone said. “This pilot project will demonstrate that electric vehicles are a practical option for commuters and increase awareness of the potential of renewable energy and its application.” “Buying electric cars are one way people can respond to the high cost of gasoline and reduce our dependence on foreign oil,” Councilman Cuthbertson said. “This charging station should help answer one of the major questions in buying an electric powered car: how, where and when can I charge it?” The project’s cost was $138,500, for both the charging station and the solar panels. Of that, $104,000 is from federal stimulus funds in a competitive program administered by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. The remaining money came from the Town’s Environmental, Open Space and Parks Improvement (EOSPA) green projects program. Currently, the charging station is available on a first-come, first serve basis. If the Town finds that the demand is greater, the Town will put together a schedule allocating the spaces fairly. Right now, the charging station is free. The Town may reassess whether to charge for the service, based on demand. “This charging station is another benefit the Town provides for owners of hybrid and alternative fuel vehicles as a further example of our commitment to the environment, keeping our water clean and improving the air we breathe,” Councilwoman Susan Berland said. To use the charging station, residents need to obtain a Hybrid/Alternative Fuel Parking Permit from the Town Clerk's office. The permit, which is free, also allows residents to park at Town beaches and at metered parking areas throughout the Town, except for the incorporated village of Northport. “This charging station should help give new meaning to the term “station car:” Instead of the polluting junker on its last legs, it will become the state-of-the-art, sustainable transporter,” said Councilman Mark Mayoka. Other examples of the Town's commitment to alternative energy sources are the demonstration solar energy project at Town Hall and the conversion of all garbage trucks, both Town-owned and private carters, to compressed natural gas. The Town has several hybrid and alternative fuel vehicles, including a street lighting truck, and last year also put into service three hybrid buses on its HART system. “All of these initiatives help reduce energy costs and save taxpayers money,” said Councilman Eugene Cook. “Supervisor Petrone and the Town of Huntington are leading the way in promoting solar energy projects that help reduce our dependency on foreign oil while providing significant environmental benefits,” said David G. Schieren, CEO of EmPower Solar, which installed the charging station. “This commitment by the Town confirms the viability of solar power as the growing and dominant energy technology of the 21st century.” “Electric vehicles offer a cleaner alternative to combustion engines, helping to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels and the emission of greenhouse gases,” said Francis J. Murray Jr., President and CEO of NYSERDA. “NYSERDA is pleased to partner with the Town of Huntington to fund five EV charging stations at Huntington Station and help promote electric vehicle use among commuters.”


 


Huntington Station Action Coalition NOW Presentations Available for ViewingThTo


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/20/2012

 
The Power Point presentations from the April 18, 2012 meeting of the Huntington Station Action Coalition NOW are available for viewing on the Town's website. The presentations update the public on the progress of each of the Coalition's nine subcommittees and on crime trends in the Second Precinct over the last three years. To view the Action Coalition Power Point, click here: http://huntingtonny.gov/permit_pics/1394.pdf To view the Second Precinct's Power Point, click here: http://huntingtonny.gov/permit_pics/1395.pdf The meeting is also being readied for broadcast on the Town's government access channels, Cablevision Channel 18 and Verizon FiOS channel 38.

 


Huntington @ Your Service Adds Android App


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/10/2012

 
Huntingtion @ Your Service, the citizen request management system that has made it easier for residents to get information from Town Hall and to file requests for action by the Town, is now available for users of Android—based smart phones. Launched for public use on March 1, Huntington @ Your Service has provided visitors to the Town’s website, http://HuntingtonNY.gov, and users of I-Phones the ability to communicate with the Town 24/7, as the system’s automated routing ensures that a request for action is quickly forwarded to the right person at the right Town department. Citizens can also track the progress of their request, whether they use one of the new avenues of communication, telephone a Town Department or send a letter. Since March 1, the Town has received more than 1,000 service requests that were entered into Huntington @ Your Service; of those, 95 percent have been resolved and closed. The Town’s vendor, QScend Technogies, recently completed the Android-based phone app for clients of its QAlert citizen request management system, allowing Huntington to extend the benefits of Huntington @ Your Service to Android-based phone users. Persons can download the Android phone App through Town’s website or directly through Google Play. Details of how to use Huntington @ Your Service are contained in two short videos that can be viewed through the Town website, the Town’s Facebook page or on YouTube, at the TownofHuntington YouTube channel. Supervisor Frank P. Petrone hosts one of the videos, detailing how to use the system through the Town’s website. The other, narrated by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, details how to use the smart phone app. The YouTube links are: For the website tutorial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StwudmhEGp0&list=UUPa3tyOvuEoSyb_fYdBxDjA&index=2&feature=plcp For the smart phone tutorial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVcVsFrjbTM&list=UUPa3tyOvuEoSyb_fYdBxDjA&index=1&feature=plcp

 


Town Begins Dismantling Illegal Mulch Pile


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/9/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
A contractor hired by the Town of Huntington this morning began removing the mulch pile at the site of an illegal mulching and wood chipping operation on Jericho Turnpike in West Huntington, immediately after Supervisor Frank P. Petrone declared that an emergency existed because of the fires burning in the mulch piles. The declaration allowed the Town to enter the property to begin removing the piles “to protect the health and safety of the people of the town of Huntington and all persons and property located in the vicinity of the subject property,” the emergency order noted.The Town contacted Laser Industries to handle the removal, which began at 8 a.m. and is expected to continue for a few weeks. The mulch is being taken to a private facility in the town of Brookhaven that is licensed to accept it. The owners of the property, John and Wayne Dougal, will be billed for the cost of the removal and disposal. The town currently does not have an estimate of the cost. Council Members Mark Cuthbertson and Susan Berland, who announced the Town’s action at a news conference held at the site, noted that two fires in the mulch pile over the course of eight days prompted the Town’s response. After the first fire, on Monday, April 2, the Town went to court and obtained a temporary restraining order preventing the further dumping on the mulch pile. The owners also were cited for two violations of the state fire code and one violation of Town code. Town attorneys obtained the temporary restraining order in State Supreme Court on Thursday, April 5. A court date was set for April 12 for a hearing to consider making the temporary restraining order permanent. During a court conference on April 5, the Town agreed that the Town fire marshal would meet with John Dougal about how he could come up with an emergency plan for the Town’s review, including getting rid of the mulch. On the morning of April 7, the second fire broke out. Chief Fire Marshal Terrence McNally, who went to the scene, determined that a dangerous and unsafe condition existed in the form of burning piles of mulch and ordered John and Wayne Dougal to remedy the situation. The Dougals were told to remove the mulch piles, which were on fire and emitting smoke. The fires also were located near stacks of wood, a wooded area and homes. Additionally, there is wood and other flammable material debris mixed into the mulch piles. The Dougals were notified there is the threat that the fire will spread to the stacks of nearby wood piles and/or through the wooded area and threaten the lives and properties of nearby residential properties as well as the occupants and users of their property. The Dougals were given 24 hours to remove the mulch pile. When they failed to do so, the Town moved in Last year, the Town brought two court actions, looking to shut down all activities that violate Town Code, including the wood chipping and mulching operation and a horse farm. Judges denied the Town’s requests for temporary restraining orders and injunctions that would have stopped both uses. The cases seeking permanent rulings on the Town’s allegation continue and have been joined so they are heard together. However, action on the joined case has been stalled as a result of the retirement of one judge and the reassignment to a series of judges, each of whom has recused himself. The Town is still awaiting a ruling on the permanent request. In January 2011, the Town Board approved the rezoning of the property to allow construction of the Kensington Estates luxury senior housing development. After a delay while the buyer and seller of the property filed the necessary covenants and restrictions, the local law enacting the zone change was filed with the New York Secretary of State on April 1, 2011. The proposal is currently undergoing site plan review by the Town.


 


Town Moves to Shut Illegal Wood Chipping Operation


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/4/2012

 
The Town of Huntington today obtained a temporary restraining order shutting down an illegal mulching and wood chipping operation on Jericho Turnpike in West Huntington, one day after five fire departments responded to a fire in a 25-foot high mulch pile on the property, which straddles the Huntington-Oyster Bay border. The order, signed by Acting State Supreme Court Justice Stephen A. Behar, prevents Big Dougs Enterprises, Indian Head Ranch and Wayne and John Dougal from operating their wood chipping and mulching business on the property at 1130 West Jericho Turnpike until a hearing can be held on the Town's request to extend the relief to include clean up and remediation of the property in compliance with the Huntington Town Code and the New York State Fire Code. A hearing is scheduled for April 5 before State Sureme Court Justice Joseph Farneti. For some time, the Town has been awaiting decisions on our requests that a judge order the illegal activity on this property to cease, Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. Meanwhile, the defendants have continued to operate. We are pleased that Judge Behar agrees with the Town that, especially in light of yesterday's fire and the threat the activity poses to the health and safety of nearby residents, enough is enough. In an affidavit attached to the court papers, Fire Marshall Paul Latuso notes that the fire occurred in a 25-foot high mulch pile and, according to his professional opinion, appeared to be the result of decomposition of mulch and other organic material in the pile. Latuso issued two summonses alleging violation of the State Fire Code for storing and processing compost and for storage and processing without a required emergency plan and a third summons for violation of the section of Town Code prohibiting open burning. The Town is asking for expedited hearings on those summonses, which are answerable in Suffolk County District Court. Unless mitigation of the volume of material is addressed, the situation in the hazard that occurred on April 2, 2012 is likely to occur again, Latuso stated in his affidavit. Furthermore, if this condition continues as is, there is always a possibility that a fire could result, the dimensions of which are unknown. Defendants are operating a business that is open to the public absent authorization from the Town of Huntington or the Town of Huntington Zoning Board of Appeals, and such business is conducted in buildings and structures without certificates of occupancy or certificates of permitted use," James Matthews, counsel to the Town's Zoning Board of Appeals, said in a separate affidavit. Matthews lists the buildings as including a mobile home, a structure commonly referred to as the Tucson Gardens building, a five-bay cement block building, a steel riding arena and a wood frame barn/stable. Last year, the Town brought two court actions against Big Dougs Enterprises, looking to shut down all activities that violate Town Code, including the wood chipping and mulching operation and a horse farm. Judges denied the Town's requests for temporary restraining orders and injunctions that would have stopped both uses. The cases seeking permanent rulings on the Town's allegation continue and have been joined so they are heard together. However, action on the joined case has been stalled as a result of the retirement of one judge and the reassignment to a series of judges, each of whom has recused himself. The Town is still awaiting a ruling on the permanent request. In January 2011, the Town Board approved the rezoning of the property to allow construction of the Kensington Estates luxury senior housing development. After a delay while the buyer and seller of the property filed the necessary covenants and restrictions, the local law enacting the zone change was filed with the New York Secretary of State on April 1, 2011. The proposal is currently undergoing site plan review by the Town. The Town was represented in court today by Town Attoney John Leo and Assistant Town Attorney Heidi Levine-Sorkin, and James Matthews, Special Counsel to the Town of Huntington.

 


Town Board to Recognize Teen Poets


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/2/2012

 
On Monday, April 23rd the Huntington Town Board will recognize teen poets from the community recently selected for participation in the Town’s Poetry for the HART Public Art Initiative. The event will begin at 7 p.m. at the Walt Whitman Birthplace (246 Old Walt Whitman Rd., West Hills). The winning teen poets will receive certificates in an award ceremony with members of the Town Board. Immediately following conclusion of the award ceremony there will be a poetry reading led by adult poet mentor Michael Cirelli at which each of the teen poets selected for the program will read their winning poems. After the reading there will be a brief reception honoring the teen poets. The award ceremony, reading, and reception are free and open to the public. Michael Cirelli's newest collection, Everyone Loves The Situation (Penmanship Books, 2011), winner of the 2011 Silver Medal for poetry from the Independent Press Awards, deconstructs MTV's hit reality show, Jersey Shore, flipping the cultural zeitgeist on its (gelled and sprayed) head. He is also the author of Vacations on the Black Star Line (Hanging Loose Press, 2010), which was named in About.com's Poetry Picks "Best Books of 2010," and Lobster with Ol' Dirty Bastard (Hanging Loose Press, 2008), which was a NY Times bestseller from an independent press and was featured in the "Debut Poets" issue of Poets & Writers Magazine. His work has appeared in The Best American Poetry, Hanging Loose, Texas Review, World Literature Today and King Magazine, among others. He is the Executive Director of one of the nation's largest youth literary arts organization, Urban Word NYC, and has authored two poetry curricula, Poetry Jam (Recorded Books, 2010) and Hip-Hop Poetry & the Classics (Milk Mug, 2004). He teaches courses on Hip Hop & the Teaching of English at New York University, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Bank Street College of Education. He has also appeared on HBO's Def Poetry Jam and Brave New Voices. Poetry for the HART is a Huntington Public Art Initiative developed by the Town’s Public Art Advisory Committee in conjunction with Teenspeak, Co-Lead Agency, who suggested the project to the Town. Teens in the community from ages 14-18 were invited last fall to submit poems for consideration in the program. This spring a selection panel comprised of Huntington poets Bruce Johnson and Mark Elber, as well as Huntingon Public Art Advisory Committee member Deborah Robbins (Huntington Station), reviewed the 148 different submissions from 115 different teen poets and narrowed the choices to the 13 winning poems. Additional partners in this project included Heckscher Museum of Art; Huntington Arts Council; The Long Islander, which has pledged to publish the winning poems; REACH CYA; Town of Huntington Youth Bureau; Tri-Community Youth Agency; the award reception host – Walt Whitman Birthplace Association; and Youth Directions & Alternatives CYA, as well as numerous area teachers who actively encouraged their students’ participation. Subsequent to the ceremonies, colorful placards, each bearing one of the winning youth poems, will be placed in the interior advertising spaces on buses throughout the HART system. The names of the winning teen poets and text of their winning poems will be available following the April 23rd event. For further information on Poetry for the HART or other Town of Huntington Public Art Initiative projects, contact John Coraor, Director of Cultural Affairs, at 631-351-3099 or via e-mail: jcoraor@HuntingtonNY.gov.

 


Comptroller Submits Resignation


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/28/2012

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone announced today that Tracy Yogman, the director of the Department of Audit and Control, has accepted a position in the not-for-profit sector and will be resigning, effective April 20. “Tracy has provided invaluable service to the Town over the past four years in helping to keep the Town’s finances in order so that we consistently win awards for our financial practices and maintain a AAA rating for our bonds," Supervisor Petrone said. "All Huntington taxpayers have benefited from Tracy’s efforts to help me control spending so that taxes remain low, even as services remain high. We will all miss her sound counsel and fiscal management and wish her well in her new position, which in addition to career advancement, pays more than the Town can offer in these challenging fiscal times.” During Yogman’s tenure as Comptroller, the Town has consistently received the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting from the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) for maintaining outstanding government accounting and financial reporting practices. An independent auditor that looked at the Town’s finances last year commended the comptroller’s office for the way it has managed Town spending. The Town has also maintained top ratings all three major bond rating agencies -- Moody’s, S&P and Fitch -- allowing the Town to sell bonds at favorable interest rates, saving taxpayers millions of dollars. “We will immediately begin a search to replace Tracy and are confident we will receive many resumes from attractive candidates,” Supervisor Petrone said, “Meanwhile, the comptroller’s office will be in the hands of Tracy’s capable deputy, Andrew Persich, who also has a distinguished record of government service.” Persons wishing to apply for the job should send their qualifications to Town Personnel Director Lisa Baisley (lbaisley@HuntingtonNY.gov).

 


WALT WHITMAN MALL BUS STOPS RELOCATE BEGINNING APRIL 2


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/26/2012

 
As part of the Walt Whitman Mall expansion project the HART, Suffolk Transit and NICE bus stops are relocating effective April 2, 2012 Simon Properties built the new bus stop transfer station at the southern end of the mall property, equipped with eight new bus shelters, improved signage and lighting.

 


STREETS TO BE CLOSED FOR MARCH 24 ST. ANTHONY'S ALUMNI KERRY MORAN RUN


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/23/2012

 
THE ST. ANTHONY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION WILL BE HOLDING THEIR KERRY MORAN MEMORIAL FIVE K RUN ON SATURDAY MORNING, MARCH 24. THE RUN BEGINS AND ENDS AT ST. ANTHONY’S HIGH SCHOOL. BECAUSE OF THE RUN, PARTS OF WOLF HILL ROAD, PIDGEON HILL ROAD AND NEIGHBORHOOD STREETS NORTH OF WOLF HILL AND WEST OF PIDGEON HILL WILL BE CLOSED FROM APPROXIMATELY 7:30 A.M. TO 10 A.M.. WE RECOMMEND THAT YOU TAKE THIS INTO ACCOUNT WHEN MAKING YOUR SATURDAY MORNING PLANS.

 


STREETS TO BE CLOSED MARCH 17 FOR TOWNWIDE FUND RUN


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/16/2012

 
The Townwide Fund will be holding its annual St. Patrick's Day run on Saturday, March 17, beginning and ending at Coindre Hall. As a result, portions of Mill Dam, West Shore and Brown's Roads will be closed from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Residents are advised to take this into account when making their Saturday plans.

 


Petrone Supports Pension Reform Legislation


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/15/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone issued the following statement in support of the pension reform plan enacted by the New York State: “The pension reform plan approved by Governor Cuomo and the State Legislature will, over time, help restore sanity and sustainability to a system whose funding has strained local budgets and hampered government’s ability to fund program initiatives taxpayers want without raising taxes. This reform respects the efforts and sacrifices public employees make while addressing the need to hold taxes down. I commend Governor Cuomo and the Legislature for working together to devise a plan that assists local governments’ budgeting.”

 


Town Board Approves Residences at Oheka Zoning


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/14/2012

 
The Huntington Town Board, at a special meeting held March 12, approved the necessary rezoning to allow the development of The Residences at Oheka, a project that proposes construction of up to 190 luxury residential condominiums while preserving approximately 150 acres from future development. Under the proposal, development rights from the golf course at the Cold Spring Hills Country Club in West Hills and undeveloped land would be transferred to an 18.37-acre parcel between the golf course clubhouse and Oheka Castle. The applicant, Cold Spring Hills Development LLC projects that the residences will sell for from $1 million for a one-bedroom to almost $2.5 million for a four-bedroom unit and that the project would produce a tax surplus of $2.75 million for the South Huntington School District. At a Dec. 13 public hearing, area residents expressed support for the proposal. The Town Board vote was unanimous. In other action this week, the Town Board: -- sitting as the board of the Town of Huntington Local Development Corp., passed an official intent resolution to issue revenue bonds on behalf of Developmental Disabilities Institute, Inc. (DDI) in an amount not to exceed $20 million. The bond revenues will be used by DDI to refinance existing debt and for the construction, renovation and equipping of facilities in both Huntington and Smithtown. DDI will be responsible for repayment. -- approved taking “appropriate action” – including imposing registration fees of $2,500 for residential properties and $5,000 for commercial properties – against 14 properties designated as blighted after a February 6 public hearing. The Town Board also scheduled an April 17 public hearing to declare six additional properties as blighted. -- authorized the purchase of the 12.4-acre Carpenter Farm on Old Field Road in Huntington for use as passive parkland and to provide a small parking area to access trails. The purchase price is expected to be $2.7 million, split between the Town and Suffolk County. The proposal garnered considerable public support at a June 2011 public hearing. -- authorized the purchase of the 8.1-acre former Meyers Farm in Melville for a price not to exceed $1.325 million. As recommended by the Town’s EOSPA Committee, the Town envisions developing three acres for active recreational use and holding five acres as passive parkland. -- scheduled an April 17 public hearing on awarding the license for bus shelter advertising to Sunrise Outdoor Advertising. The award followed an evaluation of the responses to a request for proposals. This would be a renewal of Sunrise’s license. Sunrise is guaranteeing the Town will receive minimum of $493,739 over the five-year term of the license. -- approved renewing the agreement with Long Island Growers Markets use part of the Elm Street municipal parking lot for a farmers’ market that will operate on Sunday mornings from May 27 to November 18. The license fee was doubled, to $1,000. -- approved agreements with four artists for their works to be displayed at selected Town parks on a temporary basis. Three of the works are to be displayed in Heckscher Park and the fourth at Billy Joel Park. -- approved the design proposal for a four-element sculptural work entitled “Generations” by Madeline Wiener to be fabricated and installed in the planned Huntington Station Plaza at New York Avenue and Olive Street. Of the total project cost of $65,000, HUD and Suffolk County Downtown Revitalization grants will cover $43,000. The balance will come from the Town’s Public Art Initiative fund. -- appropriated $1,000 from the EOSPA Fund to construct an osprey nesting platform at Hobart Beach. The osprey had nested on the superstructure of the fishing/lobster boat Wolf Larson, which was moored adjacent to Hobart Beach; last fall, the boat’s owners moved it. -- established a $30 fee for a night fishing parking permit at Town beaches where fishing is allowed at designated spots.

 


STREETS TO BE CLOSED MARCH 11 FOR ST. PATRICK'S DAY PARADE


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/9/2012

 
THE ANNUAL ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE WILL BE HELD ON SUNDAY, MARCH 11, BEGINNING AT 2 P.M. BECAUSE OF THE PARADE, PARTS OF NEW YORK AVENUE AND MAIN STREET IN HUNTINGTON VILLAGE WILL BE CLOSED AND ACCESS TO THOSE ROADS FROM SIDE STREETS WILL BE BLOCKED FROM ABOUT 1 P.M. TO ABOUT 4 P.M. RESIDENTS ARE ASKED TO TAKE THIS INTO ACCOUNT WHEN PLANNING THEIR AFTERNOON.

 


STATE TO CLOSE PART OF ROUTE 110 IN MELVILLE THIS WEEKEND


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/8/2012

 
The State Department of Transportation advises that Route 110 near the Northern State Parkway will be partially or totally closed this weekend to allow for demolition of the Parkway bridge over Route 110. Beginning at 5 a.m. Saturday March 10 and continuing until 10 p.m., only a single lane of traffic will remain open in each direction. At 10 p.m. Saturday and continuing throughout Sunday March 11, Route 110 will be fully closed to traffic except for a single southbound lane between Schwab Road and Northern State Parkway to allow access to local businesses. The State DOT plans to fully reopen Route 110 by 5 a.m. Monday March 12 in time for the morning commute. The state DOT strongly encourages drivers to use alternate routes.

 


Streets to Be Closed for Greenlawn Charity Run


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/2/2012

 
ST. HUGH’S PROJECT HOPE WILL HOLD ITS ANNUAL LITTLE COW HARBOR RUN FOR HOPE TOMORROW MORNING, SATURDAY, MARCH 3, BEGINNING AND ENDING AT OLDFIELD MIDDLE SCHOOL. AS A RESULT, LOCAL STREETS ALONG THE COURSE OF THE RUN WILL BE CLOSED FOR SHORT PERIODS BETWEEN APPROXIMATELY 9 A.M. AND 11 A..M., AFFECTING ACCESS TO THE AREA. RESIDENTS ARE ASKED TO PLAN THEIR MORNING ACCORDINGLY.


 


Huntington @ Your Service Goes Live March 1


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/29/2012

 
Huntington @ Your Service, the new citizen request management system that will make it easier for residents to get information from Town Hall and file requests for action by the Town, will go live for public use on Thursday, March 1 Huntington at Your Service provides two new avenues of communication between the Town and citizens -- on the Town’s website and from a smart phone – as well as automated routing to ensure that a request for action is quickly forwarded to the right person at the right Town department. Citizens will be able to track the progress of their request, whether they use one of the new avenues of communication, telephone a Town Department or send a letter. “Huntington at Your Service is a transformational change in the way the Town interacts with the public, helping people get what they need quickly,” Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said at the February 7 news conference announcing the new addition. “Additionally, it is organized along the lines of how people think. There is no need to understand how Town government is structured. Huntington at Your Service takes care of that for you.” Joining Supervisor Petrone at that news conference were Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan Berland and Mark Mayoka. Councilman Cuthbertson’s suggestion that the Town look into a smart phone app began the yearlong effort to enhance significantly the ways residents communicate with Town Hall that resulted on Huntington @ Your Service. Council Members Berland and Mayoka expressed support for the system. The news conference was held to announce that the Town had begun in-house implementation of Huntington @ Your Service. Since then, calls made to the Town have been entered into the system and handled through it. The in-house implementation also allowed the Town to work out bugs before starting the public-facing features. Beginning March 1, the public will be able to access Huntington @ Your Service by clicking on the icon on the home page of the Town’s website, http://HuntingtonNY.gov. Persons can download the I-Phone App through the website or directly at the Apple I-Tunes store. An app for Android-based smart phones should be available in a few weeks. Details of how to use Huntington @ Your Service are contained in two short videos that can be viewed through the Town website, the Town’s Facebook page or on YouTube, at the TownofHuntington YouTube channel. Supervisor Petrone hosts one of the videos, detailing how to use the system through the Town’s website. The other, narrated by Councilman Cuthbertson, details how to use the smart phone app. The YouTube links are: For the website tutorial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StwudmhEGp0&list=UUPa3tyOvuEoSyb_fYdBxDjA&index=2&feature=plcp For the smart phone tutorial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVcVsFrjbTM&list=UUPa3tyOvuEoSyb_fYdBxDjA&index=1&feature=plcp To help make residents aware of Huntington @ Your Service, Town employees are being asked to wear informational buttons, bumper stickers are being affixed to Town vehicles and notices are being displayed on all counters citizens visit at Town Hall.


 


TOWN HALL CLOSED ON MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/16/2012

 
Town Hall will be closed on Monday, February 20, 2012, in observance of President's Day.

 


Public Safety Officer Recognized for Rescue


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/9/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
At its February 6 meeting, the Huntington Town Board officially recognized a Town public safety security officer for quick thinking and action to assist a person who had fallen onto Long Island Rail Road tracks and was unconscious. On the evening of January 10, 2012, Public Safety Security Officer Keith Tetrault was on patrol in the vicinity of the Huntington LIRR Station, when a passerby alerted him that someone had fallen onto the tracks. Officer Tetrault responded and confirmed the alert. After radioing for police and emergency assistance, he entered the track bed without regard for his own safety and administered first aid to the victim, who was unconscious and had suffered contusions and abrasions. Suffolk County Police Units and Metropolitan Transit Authority workers arrived and shut power to the tracks. Emergency medical personnel removed the victim to Huntington Hospital for further evaluation and treatment. A proclamation presented to Officer Tetrault at the Board meeting noted that he “selflessly acted without regard for his own personal safety to help an injured person. He upholds the high standards of service and dedication to the citizens of Huntington.”


 


Town Board Moves Against Blighted Properties


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/9/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, acting for the first time to implement provisions of a recently-enacted revision to Town Code, voted at the February 6 meeting to designate 18 properties throughout the Town as blighted and placed on the Town’s Blighted Property list. The resolution also scheduled a March 13 public hearing to consider authorizing the Town to correct the blight conditions and direct that the costs of those cleanups be added to the owners’ property tax bills. Nine of the 18 properties are in Huntington Station, four are in Huntington, two are in Dix Hills and one each in Greenlawn, Northport and East Northport. All received scores of greater than 100 on the blighted property designation checklist after inspections by Town code enforcement officers. The Town Code revision was approved last July. Owners of the 18 properties will be sent notices that failure to correct the blighted conditions within 10 days or to enter into a Restoration Agreement with the Town will result in the additional action by the Town. Also at the Match 13 Town Board meeting will be a public hearing on a minor change in the Code authorizing the Receiver of Taxes to levy the costs of the cleanup to the individual owners. Currently, the Town Assessor has that task. In other action, the Board: -- approved resolutions restoring $125,808 in funding to youth and social services agencies, representing 90 percent of the cuts described in the 2012 Town Budget. As was noted when cuts were restored to arts agencies last month, the restorations were possible because the actual increase in employee health insurance costs was significantly less than had been budgeted. -- approved a local law allowing for preference to be given to businesses located Huntington in evaluating requests for proposals. Under the law, a local business submitting a proposal not more that five percent higher than the lowest price among the respondents shall be considered to have submitted the lowest price. The law still allows for consideration of other, non-financial criteria in evaluating requests. -- denied the issuance of a certificate of approval in a historic district that would have allowed construction of a three-bay service station at 114 Prime Ave., Huntington. The Board’s action followed a January public hearing at which neighborhood residents testified about how the proposed building would have an adverse effect on the historic character of the Mill Lane Historic District because the proposed building was not compatible with the historic residential character of the district. -- set a March 13 public hearing on a proposed amendment to regulate the maintenance of bamboo, which if not properly restricted can migrate from the owner of a parcel to an adjacent property, potentially causing damage to landscaping. -- approved new covenants and restrictions to allow construction of six residential units on property at the corner of West Neck Road and Nathan Hale Drive. The historic Brush House on the property will not be affected by the changes and will remain preserved. -- approved retaining Greenman-Pedersen Inc. Engineering and Construction Services to provide design services for traffic calming plans for Round Swamp Road between Jericho Turnpike and Northern State Parkway.

 


Town Introduces Huntington @ Your Service


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/7/2012

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, joined by their Town Board colleagues, announced today that the Town has begin implementing Huntington at Your Service, a citizen request management system that will make it easier for residents to get information from Town Hall and file requests for action by the Town. Huntington at Your Service will provide two new avenues of communication between the Town and citizens -- on the Town’s website and from a smart phone – as well as automated routing to ensure that a request for action is quickly forwarded to the right person at the right Town department. Citizens will be able to track the progress of their request, whether they use one of the new avenues of communication, telephone a Town Department or send a letter. “Huntington at Your Service is a transformational change in the way the Town interacts with the public, helping people get what they need quickly,” Supervisor Petrone said. “Additionally, it is organized along the lines of how people think. There is no need to understand how Town government is structured. Huntington at Your Service takes care of that for you.” “People communicate in so many different ways today, and they expect to be able to communicate with their government using their computers, their tablets and their smart phones,” said Councilman Cuthbertson, whose suggestion that the Town look into a smart phone app began the yearlong effort to enhance significantly the ways residents communicate with Town Hall. “Huntington at Your Service helps bring the Town’s communications efforts into the 21at century.” Among the important features of Huntington at Your Service: · citizens can get basic information and answers to frequently asked questions more quickly and easily. The key point of entry is a citizen portal on the Town’s website that has topics organized along the lines of how citizens think. · citizens do not have to know how Town Hall is organized. The information will be taken at wherever the point of contact is and will automatically be routed to the right desk for action · the number of people who get transferred from department to department when contacting Town Hall should be significantly reduced · citizens will be able to track the progress of their request online, or, if they call, through a tracking number. · through the map feature, citizens can show the exact location of their issue. They can also send photos or other relevant information to speed action on their request A committee that included representatives from a cross-section of Town departments evaluated the requirements for a smart phone application. The committee realized that the Town needed a whole new system for how people could contact Town Hall, and a whole new level of organization at Town Hall to handle those contacts. The Town issued a request for proposals for a citizen request management system, and, after evaluating the proposals, the Town Board approved retaining QScend Technologies of Waterbury, Connecticut. QScend has implemented its citizen request management product, QAlert, at more than 100 municipalities across the country, including Providence, Rhode Island; Reno, Nevada; Albany, Georgia; Newark, New Jersey; and many other communities in New Jersey and Connecticut. Over the last six months, the Town committee has worked with QScend and with all Town departments to create the citizen request management system here. Training sessions were held over the past few weeks to introduce the system to Town employees. This week, the Town began in-house implementation of Huntington at Your Service. Calls made to the Town will be entered into the system and handled through it. The in-house implementation will last about three weeks and will allow the Town to work out any bugs before starting the public-facing features. Details of how Huntington at Your Service works are contained in two short videos that will be viewable through the Town website, the Town’s Facebook page or on YouTube. Supervisor Petrone hosts one of the videos, detailing how to use the system through the Town’s website. The other, narrated by Councilman Cuthbertson, details how to use the smart phone app. “The Town has branded the system as Huntington at Your Service to reflect our rededicated commitment to making it easier for people to contact Town Hall and to take care of their business with the Town in the way that is easiest for them,” Supervisor Petrone said. “Whether reporting a street light in need of replacement, filing a complaint about a barking dog or merely seeking information on Town programs, Huntington at Your Service markedly improves residents’ experience in dealing with their Town,” Councilman Cuthbertson said. Councilman Mark Mayoka said, “Huntington at Your Service brings current technology to Town government and is a great benefit to residents.”


 


Petrone, Town Council Decry Vandalism at Mosque


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/24/2012

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and members of the Town Council joined with religious and civic leaders recently to condemn attacks of vandalism at an area mosque as acts of hate that do not belong in the community. “If it's a mosque today, it's a temple tomorrow, it's a church the next day. People that hate have no self respect," Supervisor Petrone said during the Jan. 20 rally at the Noor Mosque on Park Avenue. "We stand with you. You're a peaceful group here at this mosque. You're adding something special to the town and we will not let you stand by yourself." Joining Supervisor Petrone were Council Members Susan Berland, Mark Mayoka and Eugene Cook and Town Clerk Jo-Ann Raia. Councilman Mark Cuthbertson could not attend but expressed his support. The Noor Mosque has been the subject of five criminal incidents since Dec. 31, on top of two vandalism incidents in 2010. An arrest was made last week in connection with two of the incidents, but the remainder are unsolved. In his remarks, Supervisor Petrone cited other recent bias incidents affecting Long Island synagogues and churches. "We're vulnerable whether we are Jews or whether we are Christians; whether we're white or whether we are black," he said. "We're all vulnerable because, unfortunately, our society still has not accepted the fact that we are one people," he said. At the rally, the officials and clergy released this statement: “Religious and political leaders of Long Island gathered here today at Noor Mosque to denounce categorical bigotry against the House of Worship and Muslim community of Huntington. We declare that there is no place for hate in our community. “As Jews, Christians, and Muslims, we are proud citizens of democracy whose Constitution guarantees religious liberty for all. The freedom to worship in congregations of choice is the utmost right of every citizen and it displays the beauty of our values and tradition Therefore It is our duty to guard and defend this right of an individual The United States of America has been a beacon to the world in defending the rights of religious minorities. The bias crimes by the culprit against the house of worship terrified the community over a period of two years and distorted the vision of our founders. “We are deeply saddened by the senseless bias crimes committed against Muslim community and Houses of Worship. We stand by the principle that these bias crimes are not just an assault on the individual or a house of worship they are targeting, but that they are assault on our entire society and thus should be condemned strongly. “We as religious leaders representing the various faiths and political leaders have a moral responsibility to stand together to denounce these acts of violence against any House of Worship or religious group in our community.”


 


Huntington Sets 25th Annual Black History Month Celebration


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/23/2012

 
An address by a distinguished minister and a performance by well-known local jazz trio will highlight the Town of Huntington’s 25th Annual Black History Month Celebration on Thursday, Feb.2 at 7 p.m. The Rev. Dr. Kevin D. Jordan, who is on the ministerial staff of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Huntington and Dean of Academic Support Services at Dowling College, will deliver the keynote address. For over 30 years, Reverend Kevin, as he is affectionately known, has been actively involved in ministry, promoting the value of self-respect, self-confidence, and self-love as the basis for individual greatness. Dr. Jordan is a product of the Huntington and Elwood School systems who holds degrees from Princeton University in psychology and African American studies, Union Theological Seminary in practical theology and a doctorate in Education Administration Leadership and Technology from Dowling College. He is an ordained Itinerant Elder in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. In recognition of his outstanding work with at-risk populations, Dowling College, in addition to his role as Dean, asked him to serve as Acting Director of its Higher Education Opportunity Program. This program is a partnership with the New York State Department of Education designed to recruit, admit, and graduate under represented populations. He also serves as Administrative Adjunct Assistant Professor of Human Development and Learning and teaches research methodology in the Graduate School of Education at Dowling. He has been cited in Who’ s Who in America, Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers and Who’s Who in Business. He is also president and CEO of KDJM, an international ministry that promotes Christian growth and community. Both his clerical and secular duties have afforded him to speak internationally at conferences and conventions as he promotes the cries of life-long learning, social justice and Christian love. Entertainment at the celebration will be provided by the Michael Jazz Trio: brothers Matthew, David and Jordan Godfrey. The Godfrey brothers, who hail from Central Islip, play at a level that belies their tender ages (Oldest brother Matthew, the keyboardist, is 17 years old; sax player David is 15 and Jordan, 11, keeps the beat on the drums). They have brought the musical sway of sensual, seductive rhythms and the masterful moderation of upbeat tempos to locations throughout the community, as well as to the Apollo Theater and the Friars Club in Manhattan. The celebration, which will be held at Town Hall, will also include refreshments. The public is welcome to attend. For further information, contact Denise Williams, Director of Minority Affairs, (631) 351-2842, dwilliams@huntingtonny.gov

 


Town Board Restores Funding for Arts Groups


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/13/2012
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its January 10 meeting, voted to restore 90 percent of the cuts in funding for arts programs contained in the 2012 Town Budget, a move made possible by an increase in employee medical insurance premiums that was significantly less than forecast by the State when the budget was being prepared. In sponsoring the resolution to restore $210,105 in grants to groups ranging from the Huntington Arts Council (for the Summer Arts Festival) to historical societies and museums, Supervisor Frank P. Petrone fulfilled a commitment to arts groups that the funding would be revisited once final 2011 revenues and projected 2012 costs had been compiled. "It was never a question of whether these arts groups deserved to be funded at their previous levels – we all know how much the arts contribute to Huntington's quality of life -- but rather whether in these difficult fiscal times, funding at that level would prompt a tax increase Town residents should not have to bear," Supervisor Petrone said. "Happily, as the final numbers became available, so did the money to restore 90 percent of the cuts." In August, as the budget was being prepared, a division of the State Department of Civil Service advised the Town to include an 18 percent increase in health insurance premiums for Town workers. However, in December, after the 2012 budget had become final, the State advised that the increase would only be three percent – a $3 million saving in expected costs. The restored arts funding is coming from the $3 million. The Town has also modified its proposal in negotiations with unions representing Town employees to reflect the smaller premium increase. In other action, the Town Board: -- approved the historic designation of the Old Half Hollow Schoolhouse at 5 Seaman Neck Road in Dix Hills. -- approved, after a public hearing, granting a 10-year license to La Casa Café Inc. to operate a restaurant and snack bar at Crab Meadow Beach. LaCasa has operated the restaurant at Crab Meadow for the past 17 years; its selection to continue running the restaurant followed the issuance of a request for proposals and an analysis of the responses. -- scheduled a Feb. 6 public hearing on a proposed revision to Town code instituting new procedures on applications, renewals and revocations of accessory apartment permits. -- scheduled a Feb. 6 public hearing to consider acquiring a 0.38-acre parcel on Clay Pitts Road in East Northport for an extension of William Byrne Park, allowing for expanded parking and the construction of restrooms. The park is an active recreation area that includes playing fields, courts, a playground and a popular sledding hill. The parcel under consideration currently includes a small house, but is mostly wooded.

 


SPECIAL NOTICE: PARKS REGISTRATION SYSTEM UPGRADE


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/10/2012

 
Due to maintenance and up-grade of the RecTrac and WebTrac systems on Monday, January 16th through Wednesday January 18th, the Parks & Recreation Main office at Town Hall, Dix Hills Ice Rink and Website Online services RecTrac/WebTrac systems will be off-line. Please note that during the upgrade, the main office at Town Hall cannot process or receive any cash or credit card payments, RecTrac Registrations, Photo ID Cards. Please also note that credit cards cannot be accepted at Dix Hills Ice Rink with the exception of the Public Ice Skating Sessions, cash or check only for all other services.

 


BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED FOR DIX HILLS WATER DISTRICT


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/1/2012

 
The Suffolk County Department of Health Services today lifted its directive that a boil water notice be issued for the Dix Hills Water District, after 21 samples taken Saturday, December 31, 2011 all tested negative for coliform bacteria. The County's action confirms that the District's water is safe for consumption without boiling. Residents seeking additional information can contact District Superintendent John Hennessey at 631-421-1812.

 


A NOTICE TO DIX HILLS WATER DISTRICT CUSTOMERS ONLY


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/30/2011

 
The Dix Hills Water District detected coliform bacteria in the distribution system from samples taken on December 27th/28th. Subsequent tests were negative; no coliform bacteria was detected. However, as a precaution the Health Department has directed that a Boil Water Notice be issued to District customers. Water is currently being disinfected with calcium hypochlorite. Once this disinfectant is throughout the system the Suffolk County Health Services will lift this Boil Water Notice BOIL WATER NOTICE INSTRUCTIONS Boil water by bringing to a rolling boil for one (1) minute and allow it to cool before consuming. This applies to food preparation, making of baby formula, dishwashing, making ice, or brushing of teeth. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water. Discard any ice, baby formula or any food made with water earlier in the week. Alternatively, use bottled water certified for sale in New York State for food preparation, making baby formula or ice and brushing of teeth. Upon notice that this event is over, thoroughly flush the service line and all taps by running water for five (5) minutes prior to using the public water supply. For additional information, please contact Superintendent John Hennessey of the Dix Hills Water District at (631) 421-1812 or Jason Hime, PE, Office of Drinking Water of the Suffolk County Department of Health Services at (631) 852-5779. ATTENTION: DIX HILLS WATER DISTRICT CUSTOMERS ONLY

 


Supervisor Petrone Meets with Miss Huntington in Teen Pageant


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/27/2011

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone met recently with Meredith O'Connor, a 16-year-old Cold Spring Harbor High School junior who will represent Huntington when she competes next month in the Miss USA/NY Teen Pageant ay SUNY Purchase. Meredith is a NYSSMA All-State "A" rated vocalist who has trained in the performing arts since the fourth grade, a songwriter whose recorded music will soon be available on ITunes, a ballet student and an aspiring model. During the meeting, Meredith spoke with Supervisor Petrone about how she hopes to use competing in the pageant as a platform to raise awareness of two organizations dedicated to preventing bullying and reducing emotional distress and resultant suicides among teens and college students, The Jed Foundation (https://jedfoundation.org) and The It Gets Better Project (www.itgetsbetter.org) . Supervisor Petrone commended Meredith for her activities to prevent bullying and wished her well in the competition, which is to be held January 14 and 15.


 


Volunteers Sought for Huntington Station Action Coalition Committees


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/21/2011

 
On Friday, December 16th, an open working session of the Huntington Station Action Coalition was held to discuss subcommittees. Residents unable to attend the December 16th meeting may still sign up to participate. The eight subcommittees are as follows: 1. Coalition of Clergy. Clerical leaders will work together to bring Huntington houses of worship together to discuss and address community concerns. Clergy will network and engage in information sharing within their respective congregations to empower individuals and families with support services and resources from the County (DSS), the Town and the many human/social service agencies and not for profits in the community. 2. Professional Volunteer Corps. A volunteer group of professionals including educators, attorneys, judges, district attorneys, social workers, psychologists, physicians and others whose expertise can be tapped as needed to address problems. A possible offshoot of this group will be the development of a community quality of life court. 3. Coalition Awareness Campaign. A communications team to develop a comprehensive media/community campaign to promote the work of the Huntington Station Action Coalition and to coordinate internal communications between the committees. 4. Funding Resources Committee. To lobby for and identify various sources of funding at all levels of government for policing and youth services to address community issues. 5. Housing & Code Enforcement. To respond to and make recommendations with respect to housing and zoning violations surfaced via Coalition activities. 6. Policing & Enforcement. Policing and enforcement resources, as well as probation, are discussed and acted upon to ensure community issues are being properly addressed. 7. Community Organization/Civic Development. Community outreach to stimulate civic engagement and participation in HSAC initiatives for the betterment of Huntington Station and its residents. 8. Education, Human & Social Services. Application of education, human and social service resources to assist at risk youth and families and address other emerging community needs. To sign up, email your committee choice/s and contact information to: Huntington Station Action NOW Co-Chairs, Dolores Thompson at huntsec@aol or Ed Perez at eperez@diversityresourcenetwork.com Subcommittee Co-Chairs will make contact with volunteers with meeting dates and times.

 


Town Waives Adoption Fee at Animal Shelter


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/14/2011

 
Trying to make the holiday season merrier for residents of the Town and the Town Animal Shelter, the Town Board has waived the $80 adoption fee between now and Dec. 31. Approximately 60 dogs at the shelter are available for adoption, with a mix of ages, sizes and breeds. In waiving the fee, the Town hopes to encourage persons looking a dog as part of their holiday shopping to consider those at the shelter who are in need of new homes. People adopting dogs will still have to pay the $15 licensing fee and $8.50 charge for a rabies shot. All dogs will have been spayed or neutered before they are sent home.

 


Huntington Station Action Coalition to Hold Open Working Session


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/14/2011

 
The Huntington Station Action Coalition will hold an open working session on Friday, December 16, 2011 at 3 p.m. in the Town Hall board room. The meeting will discuss committees formed as a result of previous meetings and discussions and introduce the committee chairs. Residents interested in serving on committees are welcome to attend. Committee sign-up sheets will be available.

 


Huntington Seeks Residents' Holiday Decoration Photos


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/13/2011

 
Spread the Holiday Cheer!!! Huntington Town Supervisor Frank P. Petrone invites you to e-mail the Town a digital photo of your 2011 Holiday decorations (inside or outside). Selected photos will be aired on the Town's Government Access Television channels (Cablevision-18 and FIOS-38). Let your neighbors delight in your creativity and imagination. Simply enter "Huntington Holiday Decoration Search" in the subject line of the e-mail and attach your favorite photo of the decorations. Also include a telephone number where we can contact you, if necessary. Please send only your own decorations, not a neighbor's. E-mail the photo or any questions to lruvolo@HuntingtonNy.gov. Photos will be shown in a rotating montage that will air for the rest of this Holiday Season.

 


Petrone Reconvenes Huntington Station Action Coalition


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/5/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

Supervisor Petrone addresses rally against gang-related violence.
 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, at a meeting reconvening the Huntington Station Action Coalition he formed two years ago to address community problems, called for a unified, focused effort to combat the root causes of recent gang-related violent incidents that have raised community concerns. "It Is time for everybody to come together – not to take sides, not to point fingers – but to take our efforts continuing Huntington Station's revitalization and addressing its problems to a new dimension," Supervisor Petrone said at the December 2 meeting, held at Town Hall and attended by local civic, church and government leaders. The meeting also served to help plan the community-sponsored vigil held on Saturday December 3. Supervisor Petrone asked Friends of the Huntington Station Latin Quarter president Ed Perez and Dolores Thompson of the Huntington Branch of the NAACP to lead the revitalized efforts of the Action Coalition, which they renamed Huntington Station Action NOW. They will meet on a monthly basis and report regularly to the Supervisor. Composed of 20 distinguished community leaders, the Action Coalition, appointed by Supervisor Petrone in October 2009, was charged with identifying the root causes of Huntington Station's problems and developing possible solutions. Supervisor Petrone named Suffolk County Legislators Jon Cooper and Lou D'Amaro as co-chairs. The Action Coalition issued a report in March 2010 that recommended both concrete proposals that could be implemented quickly and longer-term approaches to both addressing the continuing security issues in the community and supporting Huntington Station's continued revitalization. Many of the short-term recommendations have been implemented successfully, including the now-annual parade and festival attended by thousands that has helped increase community pride, heightened community outreach and greater coordination between the Town's public safety department and Suffolk County police. But with sporadic flare-ups of gang-related violent incidents, those attending the meeting agreed that efforts and additional resources were needed, especially to prevent community youth from getting involved with gangs "The problem is the youth," said community leader Al White. "We need innovative ideas to work with the kids before they get involved in gangs." "We need to be more proactive about gangs," said Legis. D'Amaro, who attended the meeting (Legis. Cooper was represented by aide Lora Gellerstein). "I'm done with waiting. We need the resources in Huntington Station to stop this before it happens." Among the new issues under discussion was the effort to secure state legislation allowing reconstituting the Town's Administrative Code Enforcement Bureau, which would be dedicated to hearing case of alleged Town Code Violations. A previous version of the bureau, formed to provide more effective and speedier prosecution of code violations, was struck down by the courts. Huntington Station Action Now will hold its next meeting on Dec. 16.


 


Huntington EECO Homes Passes 500-Home Milestone


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/30/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington EECO Homes, the Town of Huntington program that helps homeowners save money on energy costs, recently passed the 500-home milestone, keeping it on target to reach its goal of assisting up to 2,000 local homeowners reduce their electricity and heating fuel bills. Inaugurated in April 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy-approved program offers Huntington residents a free efficiency consultation by non-profit technical service provider LI Green. The company's technicians conduct in-home energy surveys and identify low-cost, high-impact retrofits that can be installed by the homeowner or LI Green to save energy and make homes more efficient, more comfortable and healthier. . Energy costs are one of the highest budgetary items faced by homeowners. By making smart choices, home energy costs can be reduced by as much as 15% with very modest investment. This can translate into hundreds of dollars of savings annually. In addition to helping homeowners achieve savings with investments of $1,000 or less, EECO Homes is now partnering with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to enroll Huntington residents in NYSERDA's Green Jobs-Green New York Better Buildings energy efficiency audit and low-interest retrofit financing program. By linking with NYSERDA, EECO Homes is has also been able to assist homeowners who want to make a major investment in comprehensive home energy improvements. EECO Homes technicians will help interested homeowners complete the NYSERDA application. Qualified applicants become eligible for a free comprehensive Building Performance Institute home energy audit and up to $13,000 in low-interest retrofit financing. "We are happy to be able to offer this free service to our residents, demonstrating to them how they can stretch their home budget by cutting energy costs," Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "I urge Town residents call now for their energy assessments before the weather turns bitter cold." "It's all about being more productive and getting more while using less," said Chuck Schwartz, Director of LI Green, the not for profit organization that manages the EECO Homes program. "2012 looks to be one of the best times in history to make energy efficiency home improvements because of the great financial assistance available from NY State to help get it done." Town of Huntington homeowners can sign up for EECO Homes online at www.eecohomes.org or by calling the EECO Homes Hotline at 631-721-1908. All town residents are eligible regardless of income.

 


Holiday Parade Attracts Thousands


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/28/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Town of Huntington ushered in the 2011 holiday season November 26 with the Second Annual Holiday Parade, Festival and Tree Lighting that drew thousands of people to Huntington Village. Fire Departments from as far away as North Tarrytown joined Huntington's volunteer firefighters, veterans and businesses in marching in the parade that began at New York Avenue and Holdsworth Place and continued onto Main Street before ending at West Neck Road. Standing on the reviewing stand at Wall Street stage and addressing the crowd, Councilman Mark Cuthbertson led the countdown that ended with trees being lit simultaneously at the street festival, on the lawn at Town Hall, on the Village Green and at the intersection of Park Avenue and Pulaski Road. Joining Councilman Cuthbertson were U.S. Rep. Steve Israel; Council Members Susan Berland, Glenda Jackson and Mark Mayoka; Tax Receiver Ester Bivona; and Legis.-elect Dr. William Spencer. The parade and festival were sponsored by the Town, the Huntington Village and Huntington Station Business Improvement Districts, the Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce, the Huntington and Huntington Manor Fire Departments and the Huntington Chiefs' Council. Building on the success of the 2011 inaugural parade, this year's version included competitions for best float and best store decorations. The winners were: Best Fire Department Float, Huntington Fire Department; Best Commercial Float, Huntington Coach Corp.; Best Non-Profit Float, Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce; Best Business Decorations, Ben's Garden (First Place), Fern's Gifts and Collectibles (Second Place) and Little Switzerland Dolls (Third Place). The Fire Department Float Competition was sponsored by Value Drugs and the Store Decorations Competition was sponsored by the Huntington Village BID. The menorah at the Village Green will be lit after a ceremony scheduled for 6 p.m. Wednesday, December 21 at Town Hall, led by Rabbi Asher Vaisfiche of Chabad of Huntington.


 


2nd Annual Huntington Village Holiday Parade


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/10/2011

 
Huntington, NY – The Second Annual Holiday Parade and Street Festival in Huntington Village will kick off at 6:30 p.m. pm Saturday, November 26, with new elements that promise to make it bigger and more enjoyable than the version that drew more than 5,000 people last year. Among additions to this year's parade and festival are competitions for the best floats in two categories – fire department and commercial – and for the best-decorated business. The theme for the parade is "holiday music." The parade route has been extended along Main Street to West Neck Road to allow more people to view the floats, fire equipment and marching bands. The reviewing stand is also being moved to the north side of Main Street; the holiday tree that will be lit as part of a brief ceremony is being moved to a more prominent location on Wall Street. As was the case last year, the holiday trees on the Village Green and at Town Hall will be lit simultaneously. Numerous fire departments, scouts, and veterans and civic groups are scheduled to participate in the parade, which will begin at the Big H Shopping Center and proceed north on New York Avenue to Main Street, where it will head past the reviewing stand. Wall Street will be closed to traffic from Main Street to Gerard Street until 9 p.m. for the festival, which will include performances from many local groups and promotions from local merchants. In addition, the wildly popular Gamin ride truck will return, as will the horse and buggy rides. Parents are invited to bring their children to meet Santa and Mrs. Claus and some of their favorite characters, including Snoopy, The Grinch, Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, Sesame Street's Elmo and Toy Story's Woody. The Halesite Fire Department will have Buddy the Elf on board the actual sled used in filming the movie "Elf." Free hot chocolate and cookies will be served. "We were thrilled by the thousands of residents who got into the holiday spirit at last year's parade and festival, and I hope that even more people will join us this year," Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "This is another example of what makes Huntington such a special place during the holiday season and year-round." The parade and festival's sponsors include the Town, the Huntington Village and Huntington Station Business Improvement Districts, the Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce, the Huntington and Huntington Manor Fire Departments and the Huntington Chiefs' Council. People attending the festival are encouraged to bring an unwrapped toy and participate in the Town's efforts to support the Toys for Tots program.


 


Bench Dedicated at Betty Allen Park Preserve


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/7/2011

 
Centerport, NY – Huntington Town Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilwoman Susan Berland joined members of the Palazzolo family at the Town's Betty Allen Park Preserve on November 4 to dedicate a bench the family donated in memory of Richard Palazzolo. Palazzolo and his wife, Anna, lived in Centerport and operated Pal Electronics, a burglar and fire alarm company based in Glen Cove. He died on Nov. 10, 2010 at the age of 71. Richard and Anna Palazzolo were frequent visitors to the park preserve and they enjoyed walking around the pond and taking photographs. The family felt the bench would be a fitting memorial to Richard Palazzolo and the happy moments he and his wife spent at the park preserve; the bench inscription includes a heart with their initials engraved.


 


Huntington Sewer Plant Gets A+ Rating


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/1/2011

 
A major Long Island environmental group has given Huntington's sewage treatment plant an A+ rating – the highest among 10 plants studied in a survey of treatment plants around Long Island. In a report issued Oct. 31, the Citizens Campaign for the Environment gave the Huntington plant, which underwent an $18 million upgrade in 2008 to bring the plant up to water quality standards for the year 2014, a score of 97 and a grade of A+ -- 10 points greater than the next highest scoring plant. The grades considered factors such as permit violations, public notification procedures, storm water management, energy efficiency, public education and climate change adaptation. Among other factors, the CCE's report noted that: · Huntington is conducting first of its kind energy efficiency hybrid compressor testing · Huntington was one of only two Towns in the study supporting a federal law requiring public notification of sewage spills · Huntington's was one of only three plants studied that conducts community education tours "We are delighted that Huntington has been exemplary in showing how to own and operate a sewage treatment plant," said Adrienne Esposito, CCE Executive director. "The facility scored high because it not only meets water quality standards but also because Huntington has implemented energy efficiency measures, adaptation for climate change and public education programs. Efficient and effective management of this sewage treatment plant equates to cleaner, safer bays for Huntington residents. Congratulations to Huntington for the only A+ in our report!" "We thank Adrienne Esposito and the Citizens Campaign for recognizing how seriously Huntington takes its responsibility to minimize pollution from our sewage treatment plant and to operate the plant in an environmentally friendly, energy efficient manner," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. Among major actions Huntington has taken at the Sewage Treatment plant are: · Completion of an 18 million dollar construction project to upgrade treatment technologies with the mandated goal of reducing the plant's nitrogen discharge by 90 percent. The project was began in 2006 and completed in 2008 well ahead of the 2014 federal and state deadline for all facilities that discharge nitrogen to the Sound. The new and upgraded facility will greatly improve the health of Huntington Harbor and the Long Island Sound by reducing the potential for Red Tides and Brown Tides by reducing "hypoxia" – a deficiency in the amount of oxygen in the water caused by excess nitrogen. · Installation, along with the nitrogen removal treatment technology, of an ultraviolet disinfection system. This system allowed the existing chemical disinfection and chemical storage and handling facilities to be taken out of service. This improved Long Island Sound health by eliminating the residual chlorine that was being discharged to Huntington Harbor as a normal part of the old treatment process · Energy efficiency upgrades that include installation of energy efficient compressors to replace less efficient blowers in the treatment process, using 30% less energy. In order to get the most efficient compressor the Town is currently doing a side by side test of two compressors to see which is more efficient. The Town also installed new high efficiency lighting in all treatment plant buildings, With rebates from LIPA the Town is systemically upgrading all lighting in the plant with higher efficiency fixture. When completed the new lighting should save an estimated $25,000 annually on the electric use at the facility.


 


Five Honored at 10th Annual Women's Networking Day


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/31/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
East Northport, NY -- Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and the Town Council last week honored five outstanding women for their contributions to the community as the Town held its 10th Annual Women's Networking Day. More than 400 people attended the Oct. 26 event, run under the auspices of the Town's Division of Women's Services, which this year carried the theme "...And Finally YOU! Ultimate Living," and focused on enhancing Health and Well Being in daily lives. The event, at Larkfield Manor, included 50 informational booths, where experts provided information, advice and demonstrations on a range of topics. Madona Cole-Lacy was on hand with Gail King, Ms. Senior America 2009-2010, to offer consultations and demonstrations on "dignity enhancement," which uses stylish hair accessories specialized for women experiencing hair loss due to chemotherapy or alopecia. The event was co-sponsored by The Bristal Assisted Living. The event was highlighted by presentations to the honorees, each chosen by a member of the Town Board for her achievements in making Huntington a better place to live. "Each of these women deserve to be commended individually for the ways in which they have contributed to Huntington's outstanding quality of life," Supervisor Petrone said. "Taken together, they impressively demonstrate the significant contributions women have made and continue to make in our community." The honorees were: Michele Martines, founder of the Frazier Park Civic Association, which currently represents over 500 homes in Greenlawn. A graduate of Harborfields High School and SUNY Brockport, she has been active in school and community affairs and organized and held community meetings in support of the application by Developmental Disabilities Institute to build dormitories at its facility at the former Little Plains School. She has also worked in advertising, retail, the restaurant business and currently works as both operations manager for a Westbury precious metals manufacturer and in the photography business with her husband, Douglas. She was recognized by Supervisor Petrone. Marian Layer, a lifelong Huntington resident who works as a special education teaching assistant at Walt Whitman High School and who has been Commissioner of the St. Hugh-St. Elizabeth Baseball/Softball League since 1995 (after becoming the first female director of the league in 1992). During her tenure as commissioner, programs expanded to include intramural and travel programs, including six summer travel teams with players over the age of 21. The intramural league has 875 participants; the summer travel teams have 280 boys and 90 girls. Among the programs she initiated was a concussion policy for all league participants. She was recognized by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson. Marie Rouse, who is affectionately known as the First Lady of the United Methodist Church in Cold Spring Harbor. A passionate and active member of the church, she is involved in all of its programs and outreach and holds training sessions to guide other volunteers. She holds a master's degree in early childhood education and as an educator for over 20 years, she received many awards and accolades for excellence in education. She was recognized by Councilwoman Susan Berland Irene Moore, chair of the Town's African American Historic Designation Council. She is a retired administrator at Medgar Evers College, from which she graduated (she also received a master's degree from Baruch College) and currently serves on the board of directors of its alumni association. She is also Second Vice President/Program Director of the NAACP's Huntington Branch, a former member of the Highview at Huntington board of directors and a charter member of Friends of the Huntington Train Station. She was recognized by Councilwoman Glenda Jackson. Barbara Samuells, a longtime Dix Hills resident, certified public accountant and college professor active in community groups who founded the group 912 Super Seniors. The group, which mobilizes seniors into acting on issues of concern to them -- including health care, preserving assets and financial security and providing quality education for their children, grandchildren and all of America's future citizens -- has evolved into an active national presence as well as into local groups in several states. She was recognized by Councilman Mark Mayoka. The Women's Division presents this annual event to help the public receive important information and learn about services offered by the Town's numerous non-profit organizations. .


 


NY Islanders Open Pro Shop at Dix Hills Ice Rink


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/31/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

In the photo: Islanders defenseman Travis Hamonic, Ice Girl Ashleen, Islanders senior vice president Michael Picker, Councilwoman Glenda Jackson, Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, Councilwoman Susan Berland and Islanders left wing Matt Martin
 
Dix Hills, New York – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Town Council Members Susan Berland and Glenda Jackson joined representatives of the New York Islanders Oct. 30 to celebrate the grand re-opening of the pro shop at the Dix Hills Ice Rink, which the Islanders will be running under a five-year contract with the Town. Prior to the ribbon-cutting ceremony, Islanders players Travis Hamonic and Matt Martin conducted a clinic for participants in the Town's recreational hockey league, and afterward, they signed autographs and posed for pictures with fans. Under the contract with the Town, the Islanders will run regular clinics and autograph sessions for their Huntington fans. The pro shop will serve both the hockey and figure skating communities.


 


Town Vows Vigorous Defense of Convenience Market Regulations


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/28/2011

 
Huntington, NY – The Town of Huntington pledged this week to vigorously defend the recently-enacted regulations on applications for free-standing convenience markets in the face of a court challenge from convenience store giant 7-Eleven. On June 6, the Town Board unanimously approved the changes in Town Code to place new restrictions on applications for free-standing convenience markets (those not in shopping centers). The changes were prompted by a study the Town Planning Department conducted of existing convenience markets in the Town, looking at traffic, parking and deliveries issues during peak hours, as well as comments by local residents about problems involving convenience markets in their neighborhoods. The study concluded that convenience markets generate more customers per hour during morning peak hours when compared to other retail uses; that while convenience markets located in shopping centers appeared to have sufficient parking and areas for on-site loading, freestanding markets did not; that as a result, cars and trucks end up parking in the adjacent residential areas, detracting from the quality of life in those neighborhoods; and that the insufficiencies also produce traffic circulation issues that create safety concerns for pedestrians. When the Town Board held a public hearing on the proposed changes, 24 people signed up to speak. Almost all of them supported the new regulations. People who spoke at the hearing told of traffic issues that will only be made worse by a convenience market and the influx of cars during the morning commuting hours, as well noise from the deliveries and patrons late at night. They all strongly urged the Town to act to protect the quality of their lives. On October 7, 7-Eleven filed suit in State Supreme Court challenging the changes to the code. 7-Eleven says in the suit that the changes "will greatly impact 7-Eleven's ability to construct new freestanding stores within the Town." The suit is being heard in State Supreme court in Riverhead. At a news conference at Town Hall on October 26, members of the Town Board pledged to vigorously defend the code changes. "We feel we are on solid ground," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "We feel we have done what is important for the communities, for all our quality of life, and we are not restricting any of these convenience stores. We are mainly putting regulations in place, for them as well as for our community and our residents." Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, who was a moving force behind the code changes, said, "We are very much united with the communities that are affected on this issue, to uphold our regulations. A lot of times we get complaints about local governments catering to not in my back yard, to NIMBY. This is very much not the case here. In this case, we've done a study where we looked at specifically what the impacts are of convenience stores, and we tailored regulations to try and address those impacts." He added, "We have regulations that should lead the way on Long Island for how to fairly treat convenience stores and address the effects they have on the surrounding communities and on the Town as a whole. We want to address these quality of life issues in a reasonable way." Councilwoman Susan Berland said, "We are united as a board in this effort to have our regulations upheld. There is absolutely a total rational basis to the regulations that we put forward. It's simply a quality of life issue. You have to take into consideration the communities that are being affected. It is up to us as a Town Board to enact regulations that deal with those negative impacts and make the quality of life better for all the residents here in Huntington." Councilman Mark Mayoka said, "We stand united as a Town Board on this issue. These regulations are important for the benefit of residents of Huntington. Every resident in the Town of Huntington has a right to quiet enjoyment. These convenience stores interfere with this right." Councilwoman Glenda Jackson could not attend the news conference, but also expressed her support of a vigorous court fight. The new regulations require anyone seeking to build a freestanding convenience market to obtain a special use permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals. The new regulations require a minimum lot size of 25,000 square feet; a minimum distance of 25 feet from adjacent residential or residentially-zoned parcels if the market will be open from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m.; a 10-foot landscape buffer to reduce noise and visual impact; an off-street truck loading space of at least 12-by-40 feet; and one parking space for each 150 square feet of gross floor area (the code had required on space for every 200 feet). The regulations also ban outdoor sales, storage and display of goods, including vending machines. The requirements do not affect existing convenience stores or those located in shopping centers.


 


Huntington Dedicates Breezy Park


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/24/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and the members of the Town Council were joined by representatives of three youth sports organizations on Sunday, October 23 to dedicate Breezy Park, a new, state of the art facility with two lighted playing fields, a practice field, a playground and other amenities on the site of a former commercial nursery. Also attending the ceremony were the parents of Brianna (Breezy) Titcomb, the 13-year-old who was killed by a drunk driver in Texas in 2005 after whom the park is named, and Joe and Nikki Gregory, who donated $1 million toward the park's construction in Brianna's memory. "This probably was the project that had the most community input, and with that tremendous community patience We're very thankful," Supervisor Petrone said in his remarks opening the dedication ceremony, noting especially the role of the Cold Spring Harbor Soccer Club in the project. Brianna was a cherished member of the soccer club. "It's great when as a community we can come together and build something that will be here for generations," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said, "and it's also great when it's a partnership. This was truly a public-private partnership that cut across government lines… This really was a collaborative effort." The Town, partnering with Suffolk County, acquired the 11-acre property following a tireless effort by dedicated and caring residents and the Cold Spring Harbor Soccer Club to keep the parcel from being developed as a bus depot and repair yard for the South Huntington School District. The project's funding sources include money from the Town's Environmental Open Space and Park Improvement Fund (EOSPA), other Town funds and the donation from the Gregorys. The remarks from the other Town Council members centered on the symbolism of the park being named after Brianna. "For generations to come, people are going to ask who she was," Councilwoman Susan Berland said. "They are going to find out her story, they are going to find her love for sports and her memory is going to live on. We don't want to forget a beautiful young lady who was taken from us too soon." Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said. "This is as a result of a very, very tragic event, but in this park, we all are able to find joy and her joyous memories." Said Councilman Mark Mayoka, "I hope people can enjoy this part the way Breezy would have enjoyed it." County Legis. Jon Cooper (who was instrumental in obtaining the County's participation), Nikki Gregory and representatives from the Cold Spring Harbor Soccer Club, the Huntington Sports League and the Huntington Village Lacrosse Club also spoke, followed by Brianna's father, John Titcomb, who was flanked by his wife, Dawn, and son, Brett. "Let us not forget that the seeds for this park were sown and grew from the ashes of a tragedy, the loss of Brianna as the result of a drunk driving collision almost seven years ago. It involved the terrible behavior and choices of another individual, who changed our lives and those around us forever," John Titcomb said. "From these ashes, passion, energy and vision produced something positive to hold on to, emblematic of a young girl and her love of life, sports, family and friends." He added, "Dawn and I would very much like to have this park not only known as an incredible facility with which to recreate with family and friends, but also as an educational awareness of the consequences to one's self and others of the consequences of driving under the influence of drugs and alcohol. Use this park to educate our young family members and players about strong decision making skills that they will carry forward, not only for their own benefit, but for society's as well. We truly feel that Brianna's spirit will be carried on the shoulders of every player who not only plays sports in this park, but on those who come here at any age to play here on the playground watch their siblings compete and on those young and old who come just to watch and enjoy life." Breezy Park was built on the site of the former Mohlenhoff Nursery. The Mohlenhoff family started farming the land in 1936. the business into a florist and garden center known across the Island. The nursery closed in 2005. The property is environmentally sensitive. It backs up on Suffolk County's Froelich/Wicks Farm nature preserve. The Titcomb family has commissioned a memorial to Brianna, which is under construction and should be ready for unveiling in the Spring.


 


Huntington Continues Communications Upgrades


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/21/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Town of Huntington has taken the next step in a year of improving how it communicates with its residents, retaining QScend Technologies to implement a constituent request management system and a major upgrade to the Town's website. The constituent request management system, which will be branded "Huntington @ Your Service," will make it easier for residents to seek information, file requests with the Town and to track the progress of those requests. It will allow residents to contact the Town both on the Internet and from their I-Phone or Android system smart phone. "Huntington @Your Service will help residents determine on which door to knock to address their issues, provide new, modern ways to engage the Town and allow for tracking and increased accountability in regard to residents' requests," Councilwoman Susan Berland said. "In many ways, it is a logical extension of the ways we have made it easier for residents to keep in touch with the Town this year, starting with the launch of our government access television channel in January and continuing with the new telephone emergency notification system we implemented just before Tropical Storm Irene." QScend is a leading provider of citizen request management systems, having implemented them for more than 100 governments nationwide. A committee of Town employees has been working with QScend to compile the necessary knowledge base articles (frequently asked questions and their answers) and to establish the routing protocols that will ensure that requests get channeled to the right person in the right department. It is expected that the system will be available for residents' use in December. Following the launch of Huntington @ Your Service, QScend will begin the redesign of the Town's website, with a target launch date by Spring 2012.

 


Art Exhibit Celebrating Diversity Comes to Heckscher Park


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/19/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone spoke Oct. 18 as part of the program introducing the outdoor art exhibit "Embracing Our Differences" that will be appearing in Heckscher Park until Oct. 26. The Town is a co-sponsor of this year's exhibit, which is organized annually by the Suffolk County Center for the Holocaust, Diversity and Human Understanding. The vibrant and thought provoking exhibition showcases up to winning artworks selected from submissions by artists and students from communities throughout Long Island. The winning entries have been digitally printed on 12' high x 16' wide vinyl banners for outdoor display. The entries all reflect the artist's interpretation of the message "enriching our lives through diversity." This is the second time Huntington has joined the Suffolk County Community College-based Center in sponsoring the exhibition. The first time was in 2007.


 


Huntington Celebrates Hispanic Heritage


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/17/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – More than 200 people joined with the Huntington Town Board and members of the Town's Hispanic Task Force Friday, Oct. 14, 2011, at the 17th Annual Hispanic Heritage Celebration Program, an evening marked by performances of Peruvian music, the enjoyment of ethnic foods, a rousing keynote address from the deputy presiding officer of the Suffolk County Legislature and the bestowing of honors on two distinguished community leaders and 20 high-achieving students. The program included welcoming remarks from Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and members of the Town Council, as well as musical performances by the Huntington High School Chamber Choir and Theo Torres Peruvian Folklore. The keynote address was delivered by Suffolk County Legislator Vivian Viloria-Fisher, a native of the Dominican Republic who came to the United States as a child and who became a U.S. citizen at the age of 18. Before becoming a legislator in 1999, Viloria-Fisher taught in Long Island school districts; as the keynote speaker, she bypassed the podium to speak directly to the audience, which included a considerable number of young persons, saying she found that most effective when she was in the classroom. Two distinguished citizens were honored for their community contributions: Dr. Lehti Laas Ramos, who is serving her fifth year as an elected director of the Huntington Community First Aid Squad and who co-founded Huntington Station Happy Helpers, which has had seven events in which volunteers have helped plant over a thousand spring bulbs and hundreds of flowers along New York Avenue in Huntington Station; and Dr. Carmela Leonardi, who has been principal of Huntington High school for the past 10 years. Previously, Dr. Leonardi served as principal of Huntington Intermediate School when it earned a New York Excellence in Education Award. Student Achievement Awards were presented to: Cold Spring Harbor High School – Julia Biedry, Gemma Colon Commack High School – Brian Hastings, Elaine Orihuela Half Hollow Hills High School East – Jessy Rafael Garcia, Ashley Jimenez, Veronica Silva Half Hollow Hills High School West – Ashley Colon, Daniel Vega Harborfields High School – Kelly Restrepo, Naomi Ysimura Huntington High School – Alex Alvarado, Norman Gomez-Vasquez, Jose Luis Hernandez-Rodriguez, Karen Parada Northport High School – Joseph Albert, Joathan Benitez, Emily Urgiles Walt Whitman High School – Raphael Reyes, Fatima Saravia The event was sponsored by the Town and by United Healthcare, Community Plan.


 


10th Anniversary of Women’s Networking Day to Focus on


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/11/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Huntington Town Supervisor Frank Petrone and members of the Town Council invite residents to the Town's 10th Anniversary Celebration of Women's Networking Day and Awards Ceremony, which this year carries the theme "...And Finally YOU! Ultimate Living," and focuses on enhancing Health and Well Being in our daily lives. The Oct. 26th event, under the auspices of the Town's Division of Women's Services, will include more than 50 informational booths, where experts will provide attendees with information, advice and demonstrations on a range of topics. One of the featured booths will highlight Beauti Control's complimentary spa treatments and relaxation techniques (dead sea aromatherapy hand scrubs, heated neck wraps and hand massage). Madona Cole-Lacy will also be on hand with Gail King, Ms. Senior America 2009-2010, to offer consultations and demonstrations on "dignity enhancement," which uses stylish hair accessories specialized for women experiencing hair loss due to chemotherapy or alopecia. It is the perfect solution to hair loss, and a great way for women to enhance their wardrobes. The Women's Division presents this annual event in order to help the public receive important information and learn about services offered by the Town's numerous non-profit organizations. The Town Board will also be honoring five exceptional women during the annual awards ceremony. The event is also sponsored by The Bristal Assisted Living. It will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Larkfield Manor, 507 Larkfield Road, East Northport. General admission is $8/$6 for seniors and includes lunch and raffles. For information, call Rhonda Shepardson, director of Women's Services, at 631-351-3291, or e-mail rshepardson@huntingtonny.gov

 


Town Board Welcomes Paramount Theater to Huntington


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/5/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

In the photo: Paramount partners Dom Catoggio and Jim Condron, Council Members Mark Mayoka and Susan Berland, Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone, Councilman Mark Cuthbertson and Paramount partners Stephen Ubertini and Brian Doyle.
 
Huntington, NY – Members of the Huntington Town Board welcomed the Paramount Theater to Huntington Village Friday, Sept. 29, as the newly-renovated theater on New York Avenue held its grand opening concert headlined by Elvis Costello. At a champagne reception before the opening, the theater's partners presented the Town Board with a guitar they had autographed that included an inscription thanking the Town for its efforts in helping smooth the way for their venture to proceed. The Paramount is in the former Huntington Theater, which for a quarter century was operated at the Inter Media Arts Center. IMAC closed in 2009. The Paramount returns a live performance venue to Huntington Village


 


Scoreboards Dedicated at Veterans Park


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/5/2011

 
East Northport, NY – Huntington Town Council Members Susan Berland, Glenda Jackson and Mark Mayoka were joined by members of the Acompora family and representatives from the Northport Youth Football and Northport Lacrosse Leagues Oct. 4 in dedicating two scoreboards at Veterans Park donated in memory of Louis J. Acompora. Louis, a Northport High School freshman, died on March 25, 2000, while playing his first high school lacrosse game. A goalie, Louis stopped what appeared to be a routine shot with his chest, but then collapsed and could not be revived. Louis parents', John and Karen Acompora, came to realize his death could have been prevented if the school had owned a portable defibrillator. They started a grassroots campaign and founded the Louis J. Acompora Memorial Foundation to raise awareness among schools and other public institutions about the importance of owning Automated External Defibrillators (AED). The foundation donated the scoreboards in Louis' memory.


 


Centerport Harbor Dredging to Begin


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/28/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

Councilwoman Susan Berland meets with representatives from the Suffolk County Department of Public Works, the Huntington Beach Community Association, the Town’s Department of Maritime Services and Centerport Boat Works to discuss details of dredging
 
The Town of Huntington wants to alert boaters that Suffolk County is about to begin the first dredging of the Centerport Harbor Navigation Channel in 14 years, a six-week project aimed at facilitating recreational boating in the harbor. The County-funded project, which is to start Oct. 1, will include dredging the channel to 12 feet below mean water and replenishing the Town's Centerport Beach and the Huntington Beach Community Association beach with a total of 30,000 cubic yards of sand. Following the dredging, the Town will reseed the shellfish stock (the northern portion of the channel area is seasonally certified for shellfishing) through its shellfish hatchery program. Due to the complexity of the dredging operation some boaters will be asked to remove their boats or moorings while the project is on going. The Town Harbormaster's Office will do its best to accommodate anyone affected. Affected boaters can move their boats to Coneys' mooring field and purchase launch service from the Town for the remainder of the season (Oct 1 to Nov 6th) at a cost of $115 for residents and $135 for non-residents. If slips are available, winter wet storage can be purchased at the standard monthly rate. Residents should also be aware that for the first half of the project, dredging will be conducted 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with associated noise. Persons with questions and concerns can call the Town Harbormaster Office at 351-3255.


 


Petrone Cuts Spending for Third Year in a Row


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/21/2011

 
Huntington, NY – Supervisor Frank P. Petrone today presented a proposed 2012 budget that cuts spending for the third consecutive year and holds the line on taxes in two of the three major funds while maintaining essential services despite a troubled economy and continued escalation of state-mandated costs. The proposed $174 million operating budget represents a $10.3 million decrease from the 2011 budget. Additionally, the $10.1 million proposed capital budget represents an 18 percent decrease in spending from 2011, a year in which some capital projects were deferred and only $6.4 million in serial bonds were issued. The only tax increase was proposed for the Highway Fund, the result of costs in 2011 due to the several major snowstorms and one tropical storm, Irene, that required plowing, street clearing, pothole repair and cutting and clearing of trees and debris from roadways and Town rights-of-way. This will result in a Highway Fund tax increase of approximately $12 per household. "The challenge in developing Huntington's 2012 Budget was to maintain services at a time when revenues are stagnant and fixed costs like employee pensions, health care and commodity and energy costs are increasing," Supervisor Petrone noted in the budget summary. "The town's economic health depends in part on municipal government providing services that create an environment that attracts and keeps businesses prospering and residents who want to continue to call Huntington their home. It is a daunting task, particularly for an administration committed to low taxes, and required setting priorities and making hard decisions." Among the key elements of the Supervisor's 2012 proposal are: · Maintaining all Town Services · No wage increase for any Town employee · A 10 percent employee contribution to health insurance costs, saving $1 million. · Elimination of 10 vacant positions, saving $700,000. · Reducing debt service by deferring certain capital projects · Amortizing the increase in mandated pension costs, saving taxpayers $4.3 million in 2012 · Using $4.6 million of debt reserves to satisfy the remaining debt on the Resource Recovery Center · The continued installation of energy efficient streetlights, that will save the Town approximately $400,000 annually that will be reinvested in the Town's energy efficiency program The wage freeze and health insurance contribution are the subject of ongoing discussions with labor unions representing Town employees. If the Town cannot obtain the necessary concessions from the unions, the Town will implement a layoff plan to achieve the budgeted savings of $1.044 million. The elimination of the 10 vacant positions will bring the Town's authorized staffing to its lowest level since 1996. Additionally, elected officials and appointed officials will have their salaries frozen for the third consecutive year. "Although the economy is showing signs of a slow recovery, finding ways to mitigate tax burdens on local residents must continue to be our priority," Supervisor Petrone wrote in his message to the Town Board. "Huntington has been proactive in reducing expenses in a manner that maintains delivery of services, coupled with non-tax revenue enhancements that leverage existing assets to generate income through initiatives like the sale of advertising on HART buses and subscriptions to Advanced Geographic Information Services tools via the Internet.' He added, "While reducing overall costs, the Town remains committed to achieving its strategic goals. We are investing in information technology systems, including a redesigned website that will improve transparency, offer new on-line Town services and extend accessibility to the public. The system upgrade began in 2011 and is scheduled for completion in 2012 and will increase the productivity of the Town as well. "I pledge that Huntington will continue to see that our parks are maintained, our ball fields are ready for play, our Senior Center continues to serve healthy meals to a growing elderly population, and that our Division of Youth welcomes thousands of children with open arms to our award winning programs. Likewise, Huntington will continue to invest millions of dollars annually in the maintenance and repair of our roads and drainage infrastructure and continue to provide the high level of municipal services on which our residents depend and expect. Huntington will finish the projects currently in design or under construction, and will continuously reevaluate priorities and view potential projects through a cost-benefit lens intended to ensure that the impact of debt service on future operating budgets remains at its historically low current level." The Town Board scheduled a public hearing on the budget proposal for Oct. 11 at 6 p.m. In other action, the Town Board: -- amended Town Code to prohibit conversion of one-family dwellings to two-family, unless one of the units is owner-occupied. -- amended Town Code to make it a misdemeanor for anyone convicted of illegal use of recreational vehicles. The Board also scheduled an Oct. 11 public hearing on a proposed amendment to Town Code that would limit the operation of recreational vehicles on private property and the hours they could be operated within 200 feet of a dwelling. -- authorized the Supervisor to sign any necessary agreements involved in the revised plans to construct a Veterans Community Center in Northport and the apply to the Department of Housing and Urban Development for federal funds that might be available for the project. -- authorized the execution of a contract of sale and appropriated funding necessary for the acquisition of a one-acre portion of the Rohberg property in Ft. Salonga for use as passive parkland. The acquisition will also provide a small parking area to access trails into the Makamah Nature Preserve that adjoin the Jerome Ambro Memorial Wetlands Preserve and the Fuchs Pond Preserve. The estimated $350,000 cost of the acquisition will come from the EOSPA Reserve Fund. -- approved the sale of 0.26 sanitary flow credits from the Town Density Rights Bank to the Station Sports Family Fun Center being constructed on Depot Road in Huntington Station. The sale price is yet to be determined. The Town currently holds 10 unrestricted credits in the Density Rights Bank. -- designated Nov. 26 as Small Business Saturday in the Town Huntington. -- appointed Mark McAteer as chair of the Public Art Advisory Board, appointed Janine Seifert as a member and reappointed Ed McEvoy as a member.

 


Town Opens Small Business Resource & Recovery Center


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/15/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Town of Huntington announces that it is creating a Small Business Resource and Recovery Center at Town Hall to stimulate economic development in the town by helping to provide small businesses with advice and tools that will help them succeed. The Center, which will be located at Town Hall, will help teach entrepreneurs how to create business plans, link them with contacts in banking and financial services and provide research materials from respected sources such as local universities to help businesses form, succeed and grow. The Center will also provide advice and resources to help small businesses with recovery strategies that will allow them to weather natural disasters and other unplanned business interruptions. "Small business is the bedrock of our economy, and the success of small businesses should lead our economic recovery," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "This center underscores our commitment to grow the Huntington economy by encouraging the formation of new businesses and helping guide businesses away from the pitfalls that could impede success." "People can spend time at the center doing research on how to start a new business and to preserve and protect and preserve their existing business when unforeseen events occur," said Councilman Mark Mayoka. Councilman Mayoka, an accountant who also has a law degree, will be volunteering his time and services to answer questions from businesses and prospective businesses. Mayoka also envisions drawing on the expertise and connections from the area chambers of commerce and business improvement districts. The center will have computers and Internet access for businesses to conduct their research and write their business plans. The Town, through the center, will direct businesses to local banks and other service providers who have agreed to provide services at reduced cost. By applying the innovative ideas generated by the Center to pre-existing small businesses, the Town hopes to bring forth and regenerate current slow markets. To implement these ideas, the Center will be assisting those small businesses with creating and cultivating their own websites, providing computer tutorials, training, increasing networking capabilities and opportunities to refresh business opportunities within the community. Additionally, a dedicated website, currently under construction, will provide additional resource tools to those individuals interested in procuring information online. "Huntington's business community covers the gamut from international corporate headquarters to mom-and-pop retail stores," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. "Our job, as a Town government, is to create the environment and provide the resources for businesses at all levels to succeed, and this center is a logical extension of our efforts." "This center, combined with the Huntington Station business incubator that will be opening shortly, demonstrates Huntington's commitment to growing our economy," said Councilwoman Susan Berland. "The more these small businesses succeed, the better of all of us are." "In today's tough economic climate, small businesses both new and seasoned have a lot of challenges in the marketplace, which is why it's important to provide this valuable assistance program to those who are economically affected," said Councilwoman Glenda Jackson. "Helping to boost the small business sector on the local level is something that each town across the country should embrace," added Jackson. The Center is expected to open next week. Among its first initiatives will be to help small businesses that may have been affected by tropical Storm Irene seek assistance through the Federal Emergency Management Administration. Applications will be available at the Center.

 


Huntington Remembers 9-11 With Solemn Ceremony


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/12/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – With the mournful tolling of a bell as each name was read, and with uplifting words from members of the Town Council and U.S. Rep. Steve Israel, Huntington remembered the 43 Town residents who perished in the Sept. 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center. More than 100 people attended the Sept. 10 ceremony, held at the Town's 9-11 Memorial in Heckscher Park. Moderated by Mario Buonpane, chairman of the Huntington Veterans Advisory Board, which helped organize the event, the ceremony also included performances by the Huntington Mens' Chorus, a rifle salute by the Huntington Detachment Marine Corps league and a procession from the Northport Pipe and Drum Band. "Our routines and so many of our lives were shattered on that day," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said in remarks delivered before the reading of the names. "Today, no monument, no memorial, no words can adequately reflect the hole that was ripped in the heart of our nation and our community on that day. Life can and must go on, but it must go on with a remembrance of all who were lost on that day." "Everybody here is personally affected by their own family members who they have lost or someone who they have loved or who they knew, and it is very tough for all of us," Councilwoman Susan Berland said, noting a close childhood friend, Glen Winnick, who died while trying to help people out of the second Tower when it collapsed. "It is good that we are all here together to give each other hope. I ask you, this weekend especially, do something really nice for somebody else…Let us keep hope alive and let us try to be the best people that we can be so that we can pay the honor that is so deserved to all the people we lost that day." "Today, each one -- reach one and teach one," Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said. "Continue to assist in achieving those common goals of the greater good. I remember that all too short of a time when we all showed caring, compassion, kindness and concern for others and for each other, the weeks and months after that tragic day. As a tribute to those who have suffered and those who were lost, we should continue the kind acts, not only today, not only this weekend, but for all the time to come." Councilman Mark Mayoka said, "My heart goes out to the many families that bravely carried on in spite of their losses and the many that have given those families a helping hand and providing them with guidance and support. Let us remember those who perished and honor the legacy of fortitude and courage that makes out nation great." Rep. Israel delivered a keynote address that concluded, "The best way to honor the memories of those we lost, of those 43 Huntingtonians that we lost, is to do the hard things, to make America a fit place for heroes to come home to. Not for ourselves but for our children, Not for ourselves but for our veterans. Not for ourselves but for the memory of those we lost. That would be the best legacy for them, having made America a better country, a country that every child salutes every morning – one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. Let us honor that memory by rededicating ourselves for that kind of country." Rep. Israel also singled out Connor Murphy, a student who led the Pledge of Allegiance and who lost his father, Kevin J. Murphy, in the attack. Connor spent the summer as an intern in Rep. Israel's office. After those remarks, David F. McKell of the Disabled American Veterans Chapter 19 read a remembrance poem. Sergeant At Arms Bill Ober, Commandant of the Huntington Detachment Marine Corps League, placed a bouquet of 43 roses at the foot of the plaque at the memorial, and trumpeter Christopher Creamer played Taps. Also participating in the ceremony were Msgr. Thomas Colgan of St. Philip Neri R.C. Church in Northport and Rev. Andrew R. Hart, pastor of the Old First Presbyterian Church in Huntington. The service was followed by a collation at the Heckscher Museum of Art sponsored by BAE systems.


 


FEMA, Suffolk County Join to Assist People and Businesses That Have Hurricane Irene Losses


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/8/2011

 
Suffolk County, in conjunction with NYS and the Federal Emergency Management Administration have joined forces to establish a Disaster Recovery Center to assist residents and businesses that have losses or damages caused by Hurricane Irene. The centers are staffed with disaster-recovery specialists who can provide information and answer questions about storm related disaster assistance and available low interest loans from the Small Business Administration. Individuals seeking assistance should register with FEMA first by calling the toll-free FEMA Hotline at 800-621-3362, applicants can also register online at DisasterAssistance.gov . The Disaster Recovery Center is located at the H. Lee Dennison Building at 100 Veterans Memorial Hwy in Hauppauge and will be open at noon on Friday September 9. Regular hours of operation will be from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm Monday through Saturday. Further information is available at suffolkcountyny.gov

 


REMINDER -- HUNTINGTON 9-11 MEMORIAL SERVICE


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/8/2011

 
DATE: Saturday, September 10, 2011 TIME: 10 a.m. PLACE: 9/11 Memorial Heckscher Park Corner of Main Street and Prime Avenue Huntington WHAT: Huntington Town holds a memorial service to mark the 10th Anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center Forty-three Huntington residents perished in the attack on the World Trade Center. Each will be remembered in a solemn service at the Town's 9-11 Memorial in Heckscher Park. The service will include a musical performance by the Huntington Mens' Chorus, a rifle salute, a moment of silence, the placing of 43 roses at the base of the memorial and the reading of the names of the 43. The service will also remember the contributions of all the first responders who assisted in the rescue and recovery.

 


Help for People Still Without Power Because of Hurricane Irene


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/1/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
For people still coping with the effects of Hurricane Irene, here are some places the Town has arranged for you to go for help: If you need a place to hang out: You just need a respite from dealing with not having power at home, and you need a place you can go to that has air conditioning, television and some other contacts with the outside world, you can go to: Family Service League 790 Park Avenue, Huntington 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tri-CYA Headquarters 809 New York Avenue (Big H Shopping Center, Behind Famous Footwear) Huntington Station Tri-CYA has 7-10 computers the public can use. Children ages 5-21 can participate in drop in activities Thursday 12-5, Friday 12-5, Saturday 12-6, closed Sunday and Monday. Village Green Senior Center 423 Park Avenue Huntington 4:30-8 p.m. additional hours after senior center programs end for the day If you want to take a warm shower: Huntington YMCA (you do NOT have to be a member) 60 Main St. Huntington 421-4243 Village Green Senior Center 423 Park Avenue Huntington 4:30-8 p.m. If you need a meal: Village Green Senior Center 423 Park Avenue Huntington 4:30-8 p.m. Island Harvest Mobile Food Pantry At Manor Park 5th Avenue Huntington Station 3-7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2 If you need help clearing debris from your property: Huntington Youth Bureau's Project EXCEL Matches homeowners with teens who perform chores at a negotiated cost. Call 271-5499 If you want to know whom to call: LIPA Hotline: 1-800-490-0075 Huntington Highway Hotline: 499-0444 Village Green Senior Center: 351-3253 Huntington Town 24/7 Emergency Number: 351-3234

 


CAREGIVERS SPA DAY POSTPONED


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/31/2011

 
Because the power has not been restored at the Senior Beach House following Hurricane Irene, the Care Giver Appreciation event "Caregivers' Spa Day" scheduled for Thursday, September 1, is being postponed. The event has been rescheduled to Thursday, September 15th from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

 


Town Acts to Help Residents Deal With Hurricane Effects


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/30/2011

 
As a significant number of Huntington residents and businesses remain without power because of Hurricane Irene and as the Long Island Power Authority is unable to provide concrete information on when the power will be restored, Huntington Town has moved to help residents and businesses maintain the electronic devices and Internet access on which they increasingly rely for essential information and contacts. The Town has set up a room at Town Hall at which residents and businesses can recharge their electronic devices and access the Internet via wi-fi. The Town also is making available work stations, as well as copying services. Arrangements have been made with local libraries to provide similar services. Additionally, the Town will be meeting with human services agencies to coordinate what additional assistance residents may need to cope with the many other effects of the hurricane, both immediately and in the future. "Cell phone capability and Internet access are no longer luxuries in today's technologically-dependent society," Supervisor Frank Petrone said. "They are the lifelines to remaining in contact with family, friends, medical personnel and important business contacts. This room helps ensure that these vital lines of communication remain open as residents and businesses await restoration of their electricity." "Towns traditionally attempt to open lines of transportation – roads --after natural disasters; keeping lines of communication open is another service the Town can provide to assist residents during times of need," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. "We hope making these charging stations and wi-fi access will help reduce some of the anxiety residents have been feeling since their power went out during the storm." "People and businesses throughout the Town of Huntington have been devastated by the impact of Hurricane Irene," Councilman Mark Mayoka said. "There has been a tremendous outpouring of help and generosity and I want to thank all who have come to those in need. Homes with generators are running extension cords across the lawn to their neighbors. Workplace carpools are being organized to help drive those who lost a car in the storm. Everywhere in the Town of Huntington, I see those who have resources sharing with those who have none. To everyone who is performing kindnesses like this, I must say thank you. Please continue sharing and helping one another." Town officials expressed their increasing frustration at the pace of power restorations in the Town. In expectation of the need to clear debris to speed power restorations, the Town deployed a total of 170 Town workers from the Highway and General Services Departments early Sunday morning, before the storm hit, to ensure a quick response. The Town also offered to match Town crews with utility workers to speed power restoration. Despite repeated contacts by the town, large numbers of residents and businesses remain without power, as well as streetlights at busy intersections. In response to that failure, room 114 at Town Hall, which is handicapped accessible, has been set up with 10 workspaces for persons wishing to access the Internet and a number of power strips for cell phone charging. Persons wishing print out e-mails or documents should bring a flash drive. Documents will have to be copied onto the flash drive, which then can be plugged into the printer in the room. The room will be open through Friday, Sept. 2, from 8:30 a.m.- 9 p.m. If a substantial amount of power has not been restored by next Tuesday, the room will reopen and stay open as needed. The room will not be open over the Labor Day weekend. Persons with special electronic needs should call 631-351-3171. Additionally, the following libraries have offered assistance over the next two weeks: Commack Library- WiFi, electronic device charging, computer workstations Elwood Library- WiFi, electronic device charging, computer workstations Harborfields Library- WiFi, electronic device charging, computer workstations Northport\East Northport Library- WiFi, electronic device charging, computer workstations South Huntington Library- electronic device charging, computer workstations Half Hollow Hills Library- The libraries that will let you charge your cell phone and will also let you charge medical equipment. The Town, in coordination with the human services agencies, will also begin gathering residents' needs beyond electricity and seeking out the assistance that might be available to meet those needs. "The hurricane is gone, but in its wake is devastation that we are only beginning to learn with costs that are becoming more apparent each day," Councilwoman Susan Berland said. "It is important that we coordinate with all the various organizations to get whatever help we can to the residents in need." "Huntington is blessed with an active network of human service agencies," Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said. "By coordinating efforts with the Town's help, we can focus these efforts to serve the greatest number of people more effectively."

 


SENIOR BEACH HOUSE, SATELLITE CENTER CLOSED MONDAY AUGUST 29


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/29/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Because of power outages as a result of Hurricane Irene, the Senior Beach House and the Satellite Senior Center at St. Hugh of Lincoln R.C. Church will be closed on Monday, August 29, 2011. Also because of issues arising from the storm, the home-delivered meals program will not operate today.

 


New Web Address, E-Mail Suffix for Huntington Town Hall


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/28/2011

 
Persons wishing to visit the Huntington Town website should use the address http://HuntingtonNY.gov and contact the Town by e-mail using the suffix "@HuntingtonNY.gov." The change, which has been in the planning stages for a number of months, was hastened by issues that arose at the onset of Hurricane Irene, disabling the "town.huntington.ny.us" address that the Town has used for many years. The contracted data center that hosted the old address was disabled by the storm, and the contractor was unable to provide the Town with a definite timetable for it becoming active again. Supervisor Frank P. Petrone ordered the new address to be activated immediately. "Fortuitously, we had been working on this change and were close to launch when this problem developed, and our Information Technology department was able to activate the new name in the middle of a storm so that our residents would not lose touch with their Town government," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "We hope our residents will appreciate the new name, which is shorter, easier to remember and better fits the standards of other municipalities." Eventually, the Town hopes to restore the old address and support it alongside "HuntingtonNY.gov" for a transition period.

 


UPDATE: TOWN TO PROVIDE BUSES TO HELP THOSE WHO WANT TO GET TO RED CROSS SHELTER


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/26/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
For people looking to get to the Red Cross' shelter at Walt Whitman High School on Jericho Turnpike Saturday, the Town will provide buses for those who cannot get there themselves. The buses will run from Asharoken Village Hall, the First Presbyterian Church in Northport, West Neck Beach and the Village Green Senior Center from noon to 6:30 p.m.

 


Petrone Declares Disaster Emergency in Anticipation of Hurricane Irene


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/26/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone today issued an executive order declaring a disaster emergency in the Town and was joined by officials from the Town's incorporated villages – Asharoken, Huntington Bay, Northport and Lloyd Harbor -- in calling on residents of shore areas who might consider evacuating to do so now, well in advance of Hurricane Irene reaching Long Island. The emergency declaration was effective at noon today, August 26, 2011. In the order, Supervisor Petrone directed implementation of the Town's disaster preparedness plan, which allows Fire, Rescue and Emergency Services and all other relevant Town departments to take action to provide whatever assistance may be necessary to protect the public health and safety. Supervisor Petrone directed all Town personnel to be available as needed in response to the expected storm. "I am making this declaration now to underscore the importance of preparing for this storm and its aftereffects," Supervisor Petrone said. "Now is the time for everybody to secure loose objects, ensure that they have adequate supplies of food and water, that they have fueled their vehicles and that they have made plans about how they will communicate with loved ones. As the storm progresses, I ask people to consider this motto: Be aware, be prepared and be safe." The request for residents who live in waterfront areas to consider evacuating came after a meeting this morning at which Town departments reported on their preparedness and the Town and representatives from the villages discussed emergency preparations and precautions. "We all agreed with the recommendation that the residents potentially most affected by the storm – those who live in the shore and low-lying areas – should consider evacuating now because of the possibility of road washouts that could leave them stranded," Supervisor Petrone said. "Once the storm begins, they, and everybody else, should stay off the roads." Supervisor Petrone and the village officials also request that persons who neither live in those areas nor have business there stay away until after the storm. "I appreciate all the hard work our villages and Town departments have contributed to preparing for this storm," Supervisor Petrone said. "I hope that all of us get through the storm and its aftermath safely, and with a minimum of damage." In an effort coordinated with Suffolk County, the Red Cross will open a shelter at Walt Whitman High School at 10 a.m. Saturday, August 27. The Town will provide buses for those who cannot get there themselves. The buses will run from Asharoken Village Hall, the First Presbyterian Church in Northport, West Neck Beach and the Village Green Senior Center from noon to 6:30 p.m. Saturday. Supervisor Petrone additionally ordered all Town beaches closed, effective at noon, Saturday, August 27, 2011, and cancelled all activities at town facilities scheduled for Sunday, August 28, 2011. The launch service provided by the town Department of Maritime Services will stop at 5 p.m. Saturday. To help in storm preparation, residents can download the Town's Hurricane Preparedness Handbook at the Town's website, http://town.Huntington.ny.us, or pick up a copy at Town Hall or the Village Green Senior Center. As the storm progresses, residents can gain updated information by visiting the Town's website or its Facebook page, by tuning to the Town's government access channels 18 (Cablevision) or 38 (FiOS), or by tuning into local television and radio stations.

 


Huntington Rededicates Betty Allen Park Preserve


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/12/2011

 
Centerport, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, joined by Town Council Members Mark Cuthbertson and Susan Berland, recently officially rededicated the Town's Betty Allen Park Preserve, marking completion of a $330,000 upgrade that included rehabilitating the spillway and dam that regulates the flow of water from Betty Allen Pond into Northport Harbor and constructing a new fish ladder aimed at increasing spawning in the pond. "This project addressed two important needs: to upgrade a popular hiking and nature observation site and to preserve a delicate ecosystem," Supervisor Petrone said. "I am pleased that we have been able to accomplish both goals, on budget and with a minimum of disruption to the public." In the late1970s, the Town designed and constructed the Betty Allen Park Preserve pond and trail system to encourage public access to Betty Allen Pond, associated freshwater wetlands and the adjacent lowland forest, a complex that represents an environmentally sound ecosystem. Betty Allen Pond drains northward to the head of Northport Harbor via Stony Hollow Run, which passes through a dam structure and under Route 25A. However, the dam, which regulates the rate of discharge from the pond, had deteriorated over time. The new spillway and dam will preserve the integrity of the pond. The fish ladder (located within the structure of the spillway) will help increase the fish population by creating new spawning areas. "After three decades, nature had taken its toll on the dam and spillway," Councilman Cuthbertson said. "With these upgrades, Betty Allen Park Preserve will be enjoyed by our residents for decades to come." "Betty Allen is one of Huntington's hidden treasures, a place where residents can enjoy both hiking and freshwater fishing. The fish ladder, one of two on the North Shore of Suffolk County, should help increase the fish population in the pond and provide a means for fish to travel between the pond and Northport Harbor," Councilwoman Berland said. The project began in December, when the park preserve was closed temporarily, and was completed by late spring. Funding for the long-planned project included a $100,000 grant from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, $65,000 in grants from the federal National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and $150,000 from the Town's Environmental Open Space and Park Improvement (EOSPA) Fund. The work was performed by Amma Construction Corp. of Huntington Station.


 


Melville Lions Donate Books to Town Campers


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/5/2011

 
Huntington Station – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilwomen Susan Berland and Glenda Jackson visited the Town-run St. John's Camp recently to thank the Melville Lions' Club for donating books that will be given to the campers as they complete the six-week program. The Lions Club chapter donated $750, which was used to purchase the books "One Brown Bunny,"


 


HART Welcomes Three New Hybrid Buses


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/4/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Town of Huntington's HART bus system recently took delivery of three new hybrid diesel-electric buses that are expected to be 20 percent more fuel efficient than the models they are replacing. The buses, manufactured in California by Gillig Corporation, are equipped with Cummins diesel engines that meet the stringent 2010 EPA emissions standards for diesel engines, meaning they are 99.6 percent cleaner than the 1992- and 1997-vintage diesel models they are replacing. Each bus cost $523,000, funded with a combination of federal (80 percent) state (10 percent) and Town (10 percent) dollars. "The slogan on the buses says it all: Breathe Easy – I'm a Hybrid." Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "These buses will benefit all town residents -- those who ride the buses and the people the buses ride by, as the Town continues its commitment to improving the environment." The buses are equipped with LED destination signs, interior and exterior LED lighting. The buses are fully Americans with Disabilities Act compliant, featuring an automated bus stop voice announcement system and a low-floor design, eliminating the need for a wheelchair lift. The lift is replaced with a ramp making the bus access friendly for elderly and handicapped passengers. The buses also introduce the new HART logo and colors as part of the HART modernization effort. The buses will be used on the H-4, H-6 and H-9 routes.


 


Plans Are Underway for 2nd Annual Huntington Awareness Day


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/18/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Mark Sept. 17 on the calendar for the Second Annual Huntington Awareness Day, a parade through Huntington Station and fair that will celebrate the community's unity, diversity and solidarity. Longtime Huntington educator and historian Jack Abrams will be grand marshal of the parade, which will also celebrate the promise for the future offered by the children of the Town. The overall theme of the day will once again be "Unity in the Community." "With more than 5,000 people attending, last year's parade and fair was a resounding success, and this year, we hope more people will join us to celebrate the great community we call our home and to have some fun." said Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, The Town is one of the sponsors of the event and the Supervisor is one of three co-chairs. Once again, bands, floats, vintage cars, service groups and local merchants will join the march through Huntington Station from West Hills Road to Church Street, ending at a fair in the municipal parking lot between Railroad Street and Lowndes Avenue. The fair will include performances by local artists, a participatory chalk art activity and booths offering crafts and services. Local restaurants will be on hand to sell food. The day will also include a one-day Sidewalk Sale in Huntington Station for businesses along the parade route. New to the festivities this year are two activities that are part of the Town of Huntington's Public Art Initiative. A Chalk Flood of street drawings will offer community-wide opportunities for creative expression celebrating the Awareness Day theme of "Unity in the Community," while a Huntington Kinetic Sculpture Competition will add a new element to the Parade up New York Avenue. The Chalk Flood, which will take place in designated portions of Huntington's northwest LIRR commuter parking lot on New York Avenue (from Railroad Avenue to Church Street), will have two components: Communal Drawing Area – a space where any member of the community can make a positive creative contribution to the celebration of "Unity in the Community." Just bring your creativity! We'll supply all the necessary materials. Featured Street Artists Gallery – a juried space where only those artists accepted in advance through submission of an application will be assigned a portion of the limited space available. An application form can be downloaded from the Huntington Awareness Day website: www.huntingtonawareness.org. Applications must be received by noon on August 24, 2011. Tips on street painting techniques can also be found at this web location. The Huntington Kinetic Sculpture Competition was inspired by Kinetic Sculpture Races held annually in Baltimore, California, and other locations nationwide. While the Huntington event, will not include either the "race" or the "all-terrain" elements of these other Kinetic Sculpture events, we're sure that it will offer ample opportunity for display of both creative imagination and engineering skills, as well as lots of fun for spectators and participants alike! Competitors will join other Huntington Awareness Day Parade participants in traversing the 1.3 mile Parade route in their unique human-powered kinetic sculptures. Judges will award prizes in a variety of competition categories in recognition of artistic creativity, engineering prowess, and expression of the Huntington Awareness Day theme – "Unity in the Community." Those interested in entering this competition can download an application form and competition rules from the Huntington Awareness Day website: www.huntingtonawareness.org. Applications must be received by noon on August 24, 2011. Tips on constructing a kinetic sculpture are also available on this website. The parade and fair are being organized by the not-for-profit Huntington Awareness Community Partnership. "We continue to look for sponsors and, of course, we will gratefully accept donations to help us keep all events and rides free of charge," said co-chair Dolores Thompson. "That way, everyone in the community can enjoy this special day. But we are particularly looking for vendors: people who want to sell arts and crafts, artwork, jewelry, fashion merchandise and other items that might be of interest to fairgoers." The third co-chair is community activist Al White. Persons interested in becoming a parade sponsor, entering a float in the parade or reserving vendor space should contact Dolores Thompson either by calling her at 631-425-2640 or by sending an e-mail to huntsec@aol.com For further information on the Chalk Flood, the Huntington Kinetic Sculpture Competition or other Town of Huntington Public Art Initiative projects, contact John Coraor, Director of Cultural Affairs, at 631-351-3099 or via e-mail: jcoraor@town.huntington.ny.us.


 


Huntington Rededicates Chapin Rainbow Stage at Heckscher Park


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/18/2011
Author: A. J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and members of the Town Council joined officials from Long Island Cares and members of the Chapin family July 16 to rededicate the Chapin Rainbow Stage at Heckscher Park, commemorating the 30th anniversary of the automobile accident that took the life of Huntington resident, folk singer and philanthropist Harry Chapin. In a brief ceremony before a memorial concert at which members of the Chapin family thrilled an audience of thousands with renditions of Harry Chapin's music, Supervisor Petrone, on behalf of the town, accepted Long Island Cares' donation of the plaque marking the rededication. The inscription on the plaque notes: "Dedicated in memory of one of Long Island and Huntington's favorite sons, a singer, songwriter, performer and social activist who inspired us all to join in his fight against hunger on Long Island." Chapin founded Long Island Cares in 1980.


 


Town Selects Master Developer for Huntington Station


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/13/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and members of the Town Council announced today that they have selected Renaissance Downtowns LLC as the Master Developer to work with the Town to design and implement an action plan for the next phase of Huntington Station's revitalization. The selection of Plainview-based Renaissance was approved by the Town Board at its July 12 meeting, based on an analysis of responses to a Request for Qualifications issued in April. The resolution naming Renaissance as the Master Developer identified the company as "a leader in the holistic and comprehensive redevelopment of suburban downtowns that is uniquely qualified to provide the Town…with a partner for a redevelopment effort to stimulate significant job growth, additional tax revenue and economic development opportunities for years to come." "In this relatively new field, Renaissance is building an impressive record of helping communities, and we expect major successes as Renaissance partners with the Town to find new opportunities to continue Huntington Station's revitalization," said Supervisor Petrone, who sponsored the resolution with Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, In issuing the Request for Qualifications, the Town sought experienced and knowledgeable real estate development organizations to assist with development and redevelopment ideas and strategies to fulfill both existing revitalization concepts and in developing new ones. In particular, the Town hopes the Master Developer will bring in private sector expertise to help stimulate Huntington Station's ongoing revitalization and help structure the strategic alliances or partnerships that will be needed to achieve the next level of revitalization. "We have made strides in revitalizing Huntington Station," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said, "but as we prepare to take revitalization to the next level, this infusion of private sector thinking will be invaluable." The Master Developer will work with the Town, the Town's Economic Development Corporation and Community Development Agency and the community to develop a Phase II Action Plan that will complement, strengthen and build upon those redevelopments accomplished to date. In commenting on Renaissance 's qualifications, Councilwoman Susan Berland singled out the company's track record of working with community residents. "I was very impressed by the fact that they concentrate on bringing communities together," she said. "Renaissance has done this in other areas and will bring this community outreach to Huntington Station – and, I might add, at no cost to the Town." The concept of a master developer is cutting edge for government but is slowly gaining in popularity around the country. Renaissance has been designated as Master Developer in four municipalities throughout the northeast: Nashua, NH, Bristol, CT, Waterbury, CT and the Village of Hempstead on Long Island. Renaissance's president and founder, Donald Monti, has also been involved with the award winning Glen Isle mixed-use development in Glen Cove, where he is Managing Partner for the development team. All told, Monti has been involved in more than 80 completed projects during his career as one of the region's premier developers; the Renaissance Downtowns team has over 35 years of development experience covering all aspects of the real estate spectrum. "This will assist in bringing Huntington Station back to the vibrant downtown/community it once was, allowing our residents to enjoy a better quality of life overall. I look forward to working with Renaissance," Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said. "We are looking to co-create an implementable redevelopment vision that represents the wishes of the people, of the stakeholders, of private property owners – everyone," Monti said at a news conference introducing Renaissance. "It's all about enthusiasm, it's all about economic development, it's all about doing things in a very open and transparent manner. We all look forward to a kickoff here, to something that we think is going to result in a very special moment in terms of seeing how people can work together. Thank you for opening your doors and inviting us to your community." In other action at the July 12 meeting, the Town Board: -- scheduled an Aug. 2 public hearing on a proposal to increase the penalties for riding an all-terrain vehicle in Town parks and to upgrade the offense from a violation to a misdemeanor -- urged the United States Citizens Stamp Advisory Committee to establish a commemorative postage stamp honoring the late Harry Chapin for his dedication to promoting social justice and for his fight to end world hunger.


 


Dix Hills Water Again Voted Best on LI, Holds Its Own Against Bottled Water


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/29/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
It's official: The Dix Hills Water District continues to have the best tasting water on Long Island. And Dix Hills water holds its own against expensive bottled brands. For the second consecutive year, the Huntington Town-run district won the Long Island Water Conference's annual competition, this time defeating the Bethpage Water District in a June 27 "Taste-Off" at Lido Beach. Dix Hills and Bethpage qualified for the Taste-Off as a result of a blind taste test conducted from May 2-5 at Farmingdale State College at which more than two dozen Long Island water suppliers competed. "It gives me pleasure to award the Dix Hills Water District the coveted title of The Best-Tasting Water on Long Island," said Karl Schweitzer, chairman of the Long Island Water Conference, which has conducted the competition for the past 26 years. "This contest always allows our residents to take a second to remember how important our water is and to realize how good it is too." "We appreciate the judges' reaffirmation of Dix Hills' status as the best water on Long Island and look forward to the state competition, where we hope those judges will prove to have as refined and discriminating taste as the Long Island panel," Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone said. The annual statewide competition, sponsored by the State Department of Health, is usually held at the end of summer, in conjunction with the New York State Fair. One day after Dix Hills won the Long Island competition at Lido Beach, the LIWC conducted a blind taste test at Cedar Beach in Babylon that pitted Dix Hills against bottled water. That competition finished in a tie, proving that bottled water and Dix Hills tap water are almost identical, except that bottled water is more expensive. "We are proud to say now that tap water and bottled water are equals," LIWC chairman Schweitzer said. "We already knew that there was no difference between the two, and today's blind taste test has proven this to community members." Supervisor Petrone added, "Residents of the Dix Hills Water District can drink to their heart's content, knowing that when they turn on their taps, they are saving money and helping preserve the environment by reducing plastic waste -- without sacrificing on taste." The Long Island Water Conference is an association of more than 50 public water suppliers dedicated to providing a safe and reliable supply of public drinking water for over 3 million people in the Nassau/Suffolk area. Its members maintain over 1,000 supply wells, 10,800 miles of water mains and nearly 79,000 fire hydrants across the Island, guarding against contamination and ensuring quality service for a region more populous than 20 states.

 


Major Pet Adoption Fair Scheduled for Huntington Animal Shelter


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/23/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
East Northport, NY -- The Town of Huntington's Animal Shelter, in partnership with the League for Animal Protection, is sponsoring a two-day adoption fair July 9 and 10, including live music, face painting, demonstrations by dog trainers, a dog kissing booth and, of course, dogs and cats available for adoption. "We invite everybody to join us for some fun – people who already have pets, people who are looking for pets, and even the pets themselves," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "We have many adoptable dogs and cats at our shelter, and we hope they will all find new families as a result of this fair." To encourage adoptions, the Town is waiving the $95 adoption fee for the weekend (there will be an $8.50 fee for a New York State license). All dogs available for adoption are behavior assessed and are spayed or neutered and have had their rabies shot. Cats are available through the Gratefull Paw Cat Shelter, which is operated by the volunteers of the League for Animal Protection of Huntington. Grateful Paw has an average of 75 or more cats and kittens at any given time. Grateful Paw works exclusively with the Town of Huntington Animal Shelter and has served the Huntington community for over 35 years. All cats/kittens are spayed/neutered, fully vet checked and given all their age-appropriate shots. The League for Animal Protection of Huntington will be reducing its adoption fee for adult cats. On Sunday, July 10, the Suffolk County chapter of the ASPCA will hold a rabies vaccination clinic; dogs can be vaccinated for $15 each. 7-Eleven of East Northport will be on hand to offer free coffee and muffins for humans; vendors providing dog treats will include Couch Petatoes and Just Dogs Gourmet Treats. Long Island Bull Dog Rescue is bringing its popular dog kissing booth. Running With the Wolves will demonstrate CPR for animals; several dog trainers will also offer demonstrations. Other participating vendors include Pet Supplies Plus of Elwood, Pet Den of Commack, Furry Paws Portraits pet photography and the Kaylee Kramer Foundation. Girl Scout Troops #1418 and #91, who have helped beautify the shelter with murals and landscaping will also be present. The fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day at the shelter, 104/106 Deposit Road, East Northport. All pets visiting the event must be properly contained: Cats coming for a rabies shot must be in a secure carrier and dogs must be on a leash at all times.

 


Huntington Renames Street in Memory of Soldier Killed in Afghanistan


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/22/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Greenlawn, NY – In a ceremony that included participation from friends, family, his Army National Guard unit and Veterans Groups, the town of Huntington on June 21 officially renamed the street in front of his house in memory of Sgt. Anthony Mangano, who was killed while serving in Afghanistan exactly three years ago. "May Sgt. Anthony L. Mangano Way be a reminder to us of the very, very brave and virtuous man who, if you had to define what the word patriot is, would be him, and we thank the Mangano family for giving us this honor of allowing us to name this street," said Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, who moderated the ceremony and whose sentiments were echoed by Councilwomen Susan Berland and Glenda Jackson, who also attended. Mangano grew up in Smithtown. He first joined the National Guard in 1991 and served until 1994 in the 69th Infantry. After that, he worked in construction and as a police officer in upstate Cairo and obtained an associate's degree from Columbia-Greene County community College before moving to the house at the corner of Irving Place and Sinclair Drive, Greenlawn, which he shared with his mother, Constance. In 2007, Mangano re-enlisted for a three-year term with the intention of joining a unit that was going into combat. He returned to the 69th, but there were no positions assigned to the war. He looked for a unit that needed people for combat and found the 101st Cavalry. Sgt. Mangano was a member of the A Troop, 2nd Squadron, 101st Cavalry, (Reconnaissance, Surveillance and Target Acquistion) and was deployed in support of the war in Afghanistan as part of a multinational task force training the Afghan national army and police. On June 21, 2008, Mangano was part of a convoy of six trucks – he was the gunner in the second truck – in Kandahar when they encountered an improvised explosive device and then were attacked by enemy fire. Mangano died in the incident. Mangano's mother, Constance, contacted Tom Ronayne. Director of the Suffolk County Veterans Services Agency, and asked if the street could be renamed in his honor. Ronayne contacted the Town. The Town Board approved the street renaming last September, but waited to hold the ceremony on the anniversary of his death. Also attending the ceremony were Town Tax Receiver Ester Bivona; Ronanyne; Mario Buonpane, chairman of the Town of Huntington Veterans Advisory Board; Capt. Lou Delli-Pizzi, commander of Bravo Company of the Army National Guard's "Figthing 69th", the U.S. Veterans Motorcycle club's Patriot Riders and representatives from the Greenlawn and Huntington Manor Fire Departments. They joined Constance Mangano; brother Michael Mangano; and sister Jeanne Renneberg. The most emotional moment of the ceremony came when Vincent Sirago, a police officer upstate who was Mangano's best friend, read from a letter Mangano had left to be sent to his family after his death. "I don't want you to think of how I died," he wrote, "I want you to think about how I lived…Know there is no greater way to die than on the battlefield with honor in service to your country. The Spartan warriors believed this thousands of years ago and I believe it still stands true to this day for the soldiers who fight and die to protect our way of life and our country."


 


AAA Ratings Help Huntington Sell bonds at Favorable Rate


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/17/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Town of Huntington earlier this week sold $9.88 million in bonds at a favorable rate of 2.82 percent, following decisions by three Wall Street investment firms to maintain the Town's AAA rating. Standard & Poor's, in its message awarding the "AAA" rating and stable outlook, cited the Town's "diverse and continually expanding local employment base with easy access to the Long Island and New York City employment bases; consistently solid financial position, highlighted by what we consider a healthy unreserved general fund balance, and low debt burden on a market value basis, coupled with what we regard as manageable additional capital needs." "The stable outlook reflects our opinion of management's ability to manage near-term budgetary challenges brought on by declines in the economically sensitive revenue stream while maintaining what we consider strong reserves. Otherwise, we do not think we will change the rating within the stable outlook's two-year parameter," S&P added. Fitch, as part of its rationale in granting the Town its AAA rating, cited "strong financial management practices, including conservative budgeting and demonstrated ability to control expenditures combined with a mature and stable tax base have enabled the town to maintain strong reserve levels and overall financial flexibility." Moody's, which maintained the Town's Aaa rating, cited the Town's "narrowing but still satisfactory financial position…and low debt burden with a manageable capital program." The $9.88 million in bonds will be used for the South Huntington Water District ($3.5 million), road rehabilitation ($2.6 million) and various other capital projects ($3.78 million). The 2.82 percent interest rate is lower than the rates paid for bonds in 2010 (2.85 percent) and 2009 (2.96 percent). The ratings apply to that bond sale and to the Town's $132 million in outstanding debt. "We are gratified that Wall Street continues to recognize the responsible way we have managed Town finances, cutting spending in response to economic pressures and managing our borrowing," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "But the big winners of these high ratings are Town taxpayers because of the money saved as a result of this very favorable interest rate." "These ratings are no accident: We have worked very hard over many years to keep the Town on sound financial footing. The interest rate on these demonstrates how taxpayers benefit from our actions," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. Councilwoman Susan Berland said, "We value these top bond ratings and how they translate into lower borrowing costs, allowing us to maintain vital services, repair our roads and make other needed major purchases without unduly burdening our residents. The Town will continue to make the difficult financial decisions that help us maintain those ratings." Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said, "While cutting spending and holding down taxes, we have also continued to provide the community with the outstanding programs and services they deserve. It has taken a lot of hard work, but ratings like these make the effort all the more worthwhile." Councilman Mark Mayoka said, "As the bond sale shows, maintaining this AAA rating is important to saving taxpayers money and we will continue our efforts to manage Town finances so we do that."

 


National Recognition for Coltrane Home's Needs


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/15/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

In the photo (l-r): Ravi Coltrane, Steve Fulgoni, Councilman Mark Mayoka, Town Historian Robert Hughes, Councilwoman Susan Berland, and Wendy Nicholas and Brent Leggs from the National Trust for Historic Preservation
 
Dix Hills, NY – The home where jazz legend John Coltrane lived and wrote his most important work, which the Town of Huntington saved from the wrecker's ball six years ago, has been included on the National Trust for Historic Preservation's 2011 list of 11 Most Endangered Historic Places, a move that the Town hopes will encourage private contributions to help restore the building and transform it into a museum and learning center. "This recognition by the National Trust for Historic Preservation reaffirms on a national stage what this home represents: a symbol of the extraordinary contributions of one of America's foremost musicians, composers and contributors to music here and throughout the world," said Councilwoman Susan Berland, who sponsored the resolution that led to the 2005 purchase of the structure. "But this endangered symbol needs support now to keep its potential alive. I call on those from around the world who urged the Town to prevent the home's demolition to come forward with the financial support that will make the home a living monument and preserve John Coltrane's legacy." Berland and Councilman Mark Mayoka participated in the National Trust's announcement about the home. They were joined by Steve Fulgoni, head of Friends of the Coltrane Home, the group charged with managing the home, restoring it and establishing programming, as well as by Wendy Nicholas of the National Trust. After a brief program, Coltrane's son Ravi, who spent his first seven years living in the home, led a tour of the building, which was built in 1952, purchased by John and Alice Coltrane in 1964 and still retains its original architectural features. John Coltrane, who died in 1967, wrote his most important work, A Love Supreme, in a second-floor guest room. In 2003, when Fulgoni, a Dix Hills resident and Coltrane fan, learned a developer was seeking permission to demolish the house to make way for three new houses, he contacted the Town and initiated a worldwide grass roots effort to save the house that included support from persons such as Carlos Santana, Herbie Hancock and Bill Cosby. Working closely with the community, and in recognition of this historic symbol of one of the World's greatest musical influences, the Huntington Town Board agreed to first designate the Home as a local historic landmark in 2005, and then purchased the Home. The Town Board placed the home with the Friends of the Coltrane Home, and has helped the Friends by committing to help maintain the property while the Coltane Home members and Coltrane family assembled the necessary plans for the Home's future. "The Town Board and all Huntington residents take great pride in the fact that John and Alice Coltrane lived here, that we played some small part in their very influential lives, and remain committed to protecting the legacy that this Home represents," Councilman Mayoka said. Although they could not attend the announcement, Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Council Members Mark Cuthbertson and Glenda Jackson sent word of their support. The Coltrane Home project is more than just the restoration of the house of one of the world's great cultural icons. It is an effort to fulfill the Coltranes' vision of goodwill, interconnection and creativity through the common language of music. It will create a museum, archives and learning center, celebrating the Coltrane's music and influences, provide an outreach center for music education, appreciation, creativity and participation for students and adults through and schools and community. Friends of the Coltrane Home is working with the NYS Historic Preservation Office and others to complete a study and Master Plan for the Home to create a museum and archives. Friends of the Coltrane Home has been awarded a $38,810 grant from the New York State Historic Preservation Office and a $5,000 grant from the National Trust for Historic Preservation for preparation of a historic structure report (total cost of the report will be $75,000). The group is also planning to establish programs in schools and communities to encourage music appreciation, participation and creativity, beginning with the Kids for Coltrane pilot project, National Black History Month, and performance workshops for students and educators. Persons seeking more information about the Coltrane Home should contact Friends of the Coltrane home at www.thecoltranehome.org, or call Fulgoni at 631-860-9200.


 


Petrone, Jackson Mark Opening of Relocated Rx Express


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/13/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

In photo (l-r): East Northport Chamber Board of Director, Irene Rocco; Councilwoman Glenda Jackson, Joanne Hoffman Beechko, Supervisor Frank Petrone; Legislator Steve Stern, Chamber Executive Director Sharon Moulton and Chamber Board of Director, Ji
 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilwoman Glenda Jackson recently helped mark the grand opening of the newly-relocated Rx Express East Northport pharmacy. Supervisor Petrone and Councilwoman Jackson were joined by Suffolk County Legis. Steve Stern and representatives from the East Northport Chamber of Commerce – directors Irene Rocco and Jill Bergman and executive director Sharon Moulton – in extending wishes of success to Rx Express owner Joanne Hoffman Beechko. The new location, at 1842 E. Jericho Tpke., in the Dix Hills Super Center, is about 50 percent larger than the previous location in a shopping center just east of the current store.


 


Town Renames Street in Memory of 9/11 Victim


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/7/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY -- With friends and family looking on, and with his three children pulling the cord unveiling the sign, the Town of Huntington June 6 officially renamed a portion of Sherman Street in memory of Michael Taddonio, a bond broker who was killed in the Sept. 11, 2001, World Trade Center attacks. "This a moment for us to recognize someone who gave of himself and to recognize his family, because they are recognizing a fine father and a fine husband, and those are the important things that we go forward with," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said in welcoming Taddonio's family and friends to the ceremony. "We want these streets and we want the people who live here to remember that we had an issue on 9/11, we lost some of our favorite people, all in the name of our own freedom and our own peace." Taddonio, 39, who lived on Sherman Street in Huntington Station, was at his job with Euro Brokers on the 91st Floor of 2 World Trade Center when the second plane hit and died as a result of the attack. His children – daughters Danielle and Nicole and son Michael – were 10, 8 and five years old at the time. At the request of his widow, Denise, and other family members, the Town Board voted to rename the portion of Sherman Street near where he lived. The members of the Town Council – Mark Cuthbertson, Susan Berland, Glenda Jackson and Mark Mayoka – Suffolk County Legis. Jon Cooper and Jamie Moran, a close friend of Taddonio's, also spoke at the ceremony. An invocation and a benediction were delivered by Fr. Kevin of St. Dominic's R.C. Church in Oyster Bay. Fr. Kevin was a first responder at the attacks. The ceremony ended with the unveiling of the sign identifying the portion of the road as "Sherman Street/Michael Taddonio Way."


 


Town Board Approves Avalon Bay Rezoning


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/7/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Huntington Town Board, at its June 6 meeting, approved the rezoning of a 26-acre parcel in Huntington Station on which Avalon Bay Communities seeks to build a 379-unit housing development. In a proposal filed with the Town in February, Avalon Bay asked to have the property on East Fifth Street rezoned from its current R-7 Residence District classification, which would allow construction of 109 single family homes, to R-3M Garden Apartment District, which would allow construction of the 379-unit, combination of rental and owner-occupied housing project. As required by Town code, 54 of the units – 20 percent of the increase -- will be set aside as affordable. "Avalon Bay's proposal will benefit all Town residents, furthering Huntington Station's revitalization and providing housing options that will allow our children entering the workforce and our elderly looking to downsize to remain in our community," said Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, who sponsored the resolution with Councilwoman Glenda Jackson. "This project will address the need for housing, stimulate economic development within the community and create local job opportunities," Councilwoman Jackson said. "Avalon Bay has shown a willingness to work with the Town, and I look forward to continuing to work with the company in addressing community concerns as the project advances." The vote on the rezoning was 4-1, with Council Members Mark Cuthbertson and Susan Berland joining the majority, and follows by less than a week unanimous approval from the Suffolk County Planning Commission. The lone opposing vote was cast by Councilman Mark Mayoka. Avalon Bay's next step is to submit plans to the Town Planning Department for review. In other action, the Town Board: -- approved an amendment to the Town Code that would impose new regulations on applications for free-standing convenience markets in the Town. The proposal follows a study conducted by the Town's Planning Department of numerous convenience markets in the Town, evaluating parking and loading requirements during peak traffic hours. The study concluded that convenience markets generate more customers per hour during morning peak hours when compared to other retail uses. The study also concluded that while convenience markets located in shopping centers appeared to have sufficient parking and areas for on-site loading, freestanding markets did not. As a result, the study found, the insufficient parking and loading areas often resulted in those activities spilling over into adjacent residential areas, detracting from the quality of life in those neighborhoods. The study also concluded that the insufficiencies produce traffic circulation issues that create safety concerns for pedestrians. -- approved the rezoning of a parcel at the intersection of route 25A and Centershore Road to allow Hilltop Homes to construct up to nine townhouse-style condominium units in two buildings. -- appointed Kenneth F. Lindahl Jr. as the Director of Public Safety, replacing Bruce Richard, who retired. -- authorized amending the agreement with the Long Island Agricultural Network, which oversees programming at the Town's two community gardens, to allow operation of a farm stand offering for sale produce grown at the gardens. The money generated from those sales will help support unfunded programming at the gardens, such as education of children and adults in community gardening techniques and nutrition, and the purchase of seeds, seedlings and other garden materials. -- authorized a contract with Swift Reach Networks to implement a centralized emergency notification system to communicate information to residents in emergencies. -- appropriated money from the Environmental Open Space and Park Improvement Fund (EOSPA) for various projects, including installation of a traffic signal at the entrance to the newly-rebuilt Sunshine Acres Park in Commack ($115,000), replacement of a deteriorated concrete retaining wall and installation of a security fence at Gateway Park ($350,000) and rehabilitation and reconstruction of volleyball, handball and basketball courts at Veterans Park in East Northport ($140,000). -- appropriated $360,000 from the Snow and Ice Removal Reserve Fund to remove sand and salt from the Town's catch basins to prevent environmental and flooding damage. The sand and salt accumulated as a result of last winter's storms. -- directed the Town's Chief Sustainability Officer to undertake a long-range energy efficiency and capital investment plan for the Town and authorized hiring Collaborative Energy Group to help prepare the plan. -- authorized creation of a Cemetery Stewards Program, similar to the Town's Park Stewards Program, in which volunteers will keep the Town apprised of conditions at the 60 historic cemeteries in the Town that have no custodian or entity responsible for their maintenance. -- designated the playground at John Walsh Park to be named in memory of Ann Pabo and her son Connelle.

 


Town Seeks $1.4 million From Operator of Illegal Used Car Lot


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/1/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY – The Town of Huntington is seeking more than $1.4 million in fines from the owner and operator of an illegal used car business. In papers filed in State Supreme Court, the Town contends that John Mastrioanni and John's Bay Limousine Inc. have continued to violate Town Code by operating a used car business at 324 Depot Road, Huntington Station, despite Zoning Board of Appeals and Supreme Court denials dating back as far as 2006. The Town also contends that the defendants erected illegal commercial signs, an illegal awning and constructed a cinderblock wall, all without approvals or permits. In 2010, the court papers allege, the defendants expanded their used car business to the property next door, at 320A Depot Rd., where they continue to operate an automobile shop illegally in a residential zone. The cars repaired on the site are then placed for sale at the adjacent property. The third defendant in the suit is 320 Brompton Enterprises Inc., the owner of the property. The suit seeks $594,500 from John Mastrioanni and $599,500 from John's Bay Limousine Inc. for operating the illegal used car dealership and an additional $218,500 from the defendants for construction the cinderblock wall without a permit, for a total of $1.4125 million. The totals represent $250 a day per violation from the date the defendants first pleaded guilty in 2004 and 2008 to the present. The suit also seeks to Court's help in closing down both illegal businesses, in the interests of the general welfare and safety of the public. "In all my years in office, this is one of the most egregious flauntings of Town Code that I have seen," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "We have repeatedly tried over the years to bring a stop to these violations through court orders and fines, but the defendants have just written them off as the cost of doing business. We are now asking the court to set the fines at a level where the only option is to close down." The request for the specific amount of fines was filed on April 27, 2011 by special counsel Ellen Schaffer. A conference was held last week before State Supreme Court Justice Jeffrey Arlen Spinner and a decision on the Town's motion for summary judgment is expected in the next few months.

 


Petrone Welcomes Home Remodeling Firm to Melville


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/23/2011

 
Melville, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone formally welcomed Power Home Remodeling Group. to Huntington at a May 20 ceremony marking the opening of the Pennsylvania-based company's Long Island office. Headquartered in Chester, Pa., Power is the nation's fourth largest remodeling company, with more than 900 employees and $135 million in sales. Power provides energy-saving and environmentally friendly exterior remodeling solutions to residents on the East Coast, has served more than 40,000 homeowners and has been recognized as a home improvement leader. In his remarks, Supervisor Petrone highlighted Power's positive effect on the local economy, noting that Power has already hired 50 new employees for the Melville office and plans to hire at least 100 more in 2011 and 100 to 300 in 2012.


 


Huntington Revises Cell Tower Code


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/18/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its May 16 meeting, approved the first comprehensive revisions to the cell phone section of the Town Code since it was enacted in 1998. The changes, which are effective June 1, establish new procedures and criteria for the Town's Zoning Board of Appeals in considering applications for special use permits allowing construction of cell phone towers in the Town. "So much has happened since the Town first enacted its regulations for cell phone towers, both technologically and in the proliferation of these towers to meet increasing demand, that the Town needed to revisit our Code to ensure that we are protecting the health and safety of our residents," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "We believe the new Code achieves those goals." Said Councilwoman Glenda Jackson, sponsor of the measure, "The changes take note of scientific findings since this part of the Town Code was enacted 13 years go and address community concerns." The new Code: · Increases scrutiny of applications for special use permits to ensure compliance with federal standards. To determine that the a tower is necessary at a specific location, applicants are also required to reimburse the Town for the cost of independent qualified consultants to review the application and studies submitted in support. · Increases the oversight on aesthetic issues by requiring planning board review of landscaping and site plans before a building permit application is filed for cell towers or antennas. The legislation empowers the ZBA to require that aesthetically pleasing structures be built to house the antennas and to limit the height of new facilities for aesthetic reasons. · Establishes tiered preferences for locating new facilities, with ones on existing structures in commercial/ industrial zones having the greatest preference and ones within 500 feet of a school carrying the least preference. · Requires pre-application conferences and provides for continuing inspections to determine compliance with the provisions of a special use permit. · Requires all applications for new facilities on Town-owned, leased or controlled property to undergo a review by the Town Board, which would hold a public hearing and apply the same standards used by the Zoning Board of Appeals in granting special use permits for facilities on private property. In other action, the Town Board: -- appointed and reappointed members of the Planning Board, Zoning Board of Appeals and Huntington Housong Authority to fill vacancies. The Planning Board appointments are: Paul Mandelik, David Pennetta, David Walsdorf, Kathleen A. Casey, Marilyn G. Healy and Leslie Cernava. The ZBA appointments are: Christopher Modelewski, Robert Slingo, Carol Gaughran, Jeffrey Naness and Edward Perez. The Housing Authority appointees are Robert Fonti, John Perri, Barry Lites and Barry Turk.

 


May 14-15 Arts and Crafts Fair Cancelled


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/13/2011

 
The Arts and Crafts Fair scheduled for May 14 and 15 at Heckscher Park has been cancelled by action of the Town.

 


Suits Seek to Force LIPA, National Grid to Drop Assessment Challenge


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/10/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Town of Huntington and the Northport-East Northport School District announced today that each has filed a suit against the Long Island Power Authority and National Grid, charging that the utility companies violated a 1997 agreement when they started litigation last October challenging the assessment on the Northport Power Plant. In papers filed in State Supreme Court in Riverhead, the Town and the School District note that in June 1997, when LIPA took over the sale and delivery of electricity from the Northport plant from the Long Island Lighting Co., it agreed not to challenge the assessment on the plant unless the assessment was increased out of proportion to any capital improvements there. In particular, the suits cited an August 6, 1997 letter from Richard Kessel, then LIPA's chairman, to Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone in which Kessel stated, "In the future, there will be no appeal or litigation of any assessment on the Northport facility unless Huntington Town singles out LIPA, LILCO or Brooklyn Union Gas property for reassessment, thus increasing the assessment separate and apart from other properties located within the Town." Since the Town has not increased the plant's assessment since 1997, the suits LIPA and National Grid filed in October 2010 seeking to reduce the plant's assessment by 90 percent directly violate that 1997 agreement, the Town and School District alleged. The Town and the School District asked the court to declare that the utility companies are in violation of that agreement; to issue an injunction prohibiting any further action on LIPA and National Grid's suits; and to award the Town and School District damages for the expenses incurred in fighting those suits, including the costs of hiring outside counsel and experts. "Aware of the terms of the agreement between LIPA and LILCO, the Town upheld its end in not raising the assessment on the plant," Supervisor Petrone said. "It is unfortunate that the Town is forced to seek a court order requiring LIPA and National Grid to do the same. However, the Town has no choice." "The Northport Power Plant has long made the Northport-East Northport community its home. Faced with this devastating decrease to its tax base, the Northport-East Northport School District has no choice but to commence action against LIPA, National Grid and all of the entities that have operated under the terms of the various agreements concerning the Northport Power Plant. These entities made promises and representations to the School District, which were made for the benefit of the School District and its residents," said Board of Education President, Stephen W. Waldenburg, Jr. on behalf of the Board of Education of the Northport-East Northport Union Free School District. The filing of the suits is the latest in a series of actions the Town and School Board have taken since LIPA filed the suit that, if successful, would result in tens of millions of dollars in property tax hikes for Huntington Town residents generally, with the heaviest impact on property owners in the Northport-East Northport School District. Among the actions already taken was the formation of a website, www.stoplipataxhike.com, to raise awareness and educate residents about the devastating effects a successful LIPA property tax challenge would have and the distribution of "Stop The LIPA Tax Hike" lawn signs. The Town Board also created an Assessment Advisory Committee, composed of representatives from Town government, taxing jurisdictions in the Northport area and area business groups, including the Village of Northport, the Northport/East Northport School District, the Northport/East Northport Library District and the Northport and East Northport Chambers of Commerce. "We are using all of the options at our disposal to fight this improper attempt to dig into the pockets of Huntington taxpayers," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. "We've gone to the public, we've gone to the courts, and we plan to go to Gov. Cuomo and ask him to rein in this move by a public agency that is not in the public's best interest." LIPA's suit contends that the Northport plant is worth less than eleven percent of the value reflected by its current assessment, on which LIPA plays a total of roughly $70-million in property taxes. In addition to serious increases in Countywide and Police District portions of tax bills, Town of Huntington residents broadly would experience tax increases of up to 10 percent. The Northport-East Northport school and library districts are looking at a whopping 50 percent tax increase. Under an agreement between LIPA and National Grid, tax savings from an assessment reduction would be passed on to National Grid and its shareholders. "The Town has always acted responsibly and fully honored its part of the 1997 agreement, said Councilwoman Susan A. Berland. "The Town and the School District expect LIPA to do the same and we are confident that the court will require LIPA to live up to its obligations." "We, along with the Northport-East Northport School district, are committed to vigorously pursuing this lawsuit against LIPA and National Grid. The 1997 agreement between LIPA and LILCO clearly prohibits any type of tax grievance to be filed over the Northport plant. I join my colleagues and the Northport-East Northport School district in full support of this lawsuit," said Councilwoman Glenda Jackson. "This is one of the many steps that need to be taken to protect the taxpayers of Huntington. In this time of economic crisis, our residents can ill afford the tax increase LIPA and National Grid seek to impose. It is enough that residents have had to spend more on their utilities. They do not deserve this double whammy," Councilman Mark Mayoka said. The Huntington State Legislative Delegation -- Senator Carl L. Marcellino, Senator John J. Flanagan, Assemblyman James D. Conte and Assemblyman Andrew P. Raia -- said in a joint statement: "If ultimately successful, LIPA's move to challenge their property tax assessment would have a crippling, long term effect on the Town's taxpayers. If LIPA is having a hard time making ends meets, how do they think the residents of Huntington feel? We continue to call on LIPA to drop the challenge and put the needs of their customers ahead of their bottom line. The Town should be commended for leaving no stone unturned in fighting this ill conceived LIPA tax dispute."


 


Huntington Launches Effort for Tree City USA Designation


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/6/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY -- Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilman Mark Cuthbertson announced today the launch of a year-long effort to obtain Tree City USA designation for Huntington Town. The effort began with the planting of 10 trees at the Town's Depot Road Park in recognition of the recent celebration of Arbor Day. "The planting of these trees is the first of a number of steps the Town will be taking over the next year to achieve a Tree City USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation as a part of the Green Huntington effort that is an important element of the Town's Comprehensive Plan," Supervisor Petrone said. "We hope residents throughout the town will join us in these plantings, that beautify the Town for our enjoyment and for the enjoyment of generations to come." "The Town of Huntington and the Arbor Day Foundation are working together to help promote the environmental importance of Arbor Day, while helping the Town achieve the Foundations' prestigious Tree USA distinction," stated Councilman Mark Cuthbertson. " Today's tree planting and joint effort will help showcase the Town's Green Huntington initiative and encourage other towns both near and far to follow suit," added Cuthbertson, who sponsored a resolution at the May 3 Town Board meeting directing the Town's Planning Director to seek and maintain Tree City USA designation. "The Green Huntington tree management and planting program is a vital component to the Town's comprehensive master plan," said Councilwoman Susan Berland. "The planting of trees is crucial to not only the revitalization of communities but their beautification. I encourage residents to plant their own trees as well, so they can watch the growth of their families coincide with the growth of the tree. I am proud that the Town of Huntington is seeking Tree City U.S.A. designation." As described in the comprehensive master plan, the Green Huntington tree management and planting program, which entails enlisting both public and private support, also includes updating and extending the inventory of trees to all properties owned and managed by the Town; enhancing tree planting and maintenance of town landscapes (streets, parks, and other public places); initiating partnerships with community organizations, institutions, and other groups to promote tree planting on non town-owned properties, working with public utilities to minimize potential damage to trees in proximity to overhead and underground utility lines; and establishing tree planting and maintenance guidelines for public places and private properties (spacing, species selection, proper care, etc.) and disseminating information as an educational tool for private use. At its March 8th meeting the Town Board authorized an Urban and Community Forestry grant application seeking funding to implement its proposed TRIPLE (Tree Registry, Inventory, and Planting Location Evaluation) Program to create a registry of new trees being added to the local landscape; inventory the Town system of over 140 parks for trees and forest habitat; and conduct a planting location evaluation to add tree cover to the Town's active parks that provide the most opportunity for people to experience them. "Keeping Huntington green is exactly what today's tree planting effort is all about," said Councilwoman Glenda Jackson. "I applaud the efforts of my colleagues and the Arbor Day Foundation as the Town strives to achieve the prestigious Tree City USA distinction and hope other communities will embrace the environmental importance of planting trees." "This is another step toward revitalization of Huntington Station," Councilman Mark Mayoka said of the tree planting at Depot Road Park. "Starting the Tree City USA designation effort here symbolizes our commitment to the community." To qualify for Tree City USA designation, communities must meet standards established by the Arbor Day Foundation and the National Association of State Foresters. Nationally, there are more than 3400 communities with the designation, including 99 in New York State.


 


Hearing Set on Convenience Market Regulations


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/3/2011

 
Huntington – The Huntington Town Board, at its meeting today, set a May 16 public hearing on a proposed amendment to the Town Code that would impose new regulations on applications for free-standing convenience stores in the Town. "What some people view as a convenience – a place where they can make a quick stop to buy coffee, breakfast items or basic staples—has actually, in some cases, caused great inconvenience to those who live nearby and has potentially affected public safety," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "With these markets proliferating, it is clear that the Town needs to establish regulations to minimize their impact on their neighbors' quality of life." "Because of the traffic they create, convenience markets should be in a class by themselves and subject to regulations that take note of their effect on surrounding property," said Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, the sponsor of the proposed code changes. "We need to do what we can to minimize the disruption they cause." The proposal follows a study conducted by the Town's Planning Department of numerous convenience markets in the Town, evaluating parking and loading requirements during peak traffic hours. The study concluded that convenience markets generate more customers per hour during morning peak hours when compared to other retail uses. The study also concluded that while convenience markets located in shopping centers appeared to have sufficient parking and areas for on-site loading, freestanding markets did not. As a result, the study found, the insufficient parking and loading areas often resulted in those activities spilling over into adjacent residential areas, detracting from the quality of life in those neighborhoods. The study also concluded that the insufficiencies produce traffic circulation issues that create safety concerns for pedestrians. Under the proposed code amendment, someone wanting to open a freestanding convenience market (defined as "a retail establishment which sells food and beverages, prepackaged or packaged within the establishment, and in a ready to consume state, which may also sell newspapers, magazines and/or other sundries of a convenience nature") must obtain a special use permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals. The market must have a minimum lot area of 25,000 square feet and, if it is to operate between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m., all commercial uses (including the building, parking lot, utilities and dumpsters) must be more than 25 feet from any adjacent residentially used property. The code amendment also requires a 10-foot-wide landscape buffer to reduce noise and visual impact on adjacent residents, unless existing vegetation is determined to be more suitable for that purpose. The amendment also establishes the minimum size of a loading area and requires one parking space for every 150 square feet of gross floor area, instead of the 250 feet under the current code. The requirements would not affect existing convenience stores or those located in shopping centers. The resolution was cosponsored by Council Members Susan Berland and Glenda Jackson. In other action, the Town Board: -- rezoned property at the intersection of Railroad Street, Lowndes Avenue and Columbia Street to allow construction of the Columbia Terrace affordable housing project that is part of the Take Back the Blocks program -- extended the moratorium on public hearings, approvals, grants and conditional use permits by the Zoning Board of Appeals for wireless transmission facilities such as cell phone towers. The Board also conducted a public hearing on proposed updates to the Town Code with respect to cell phone towers. -- approved allowing the Art league of Long Island to have its annual Art in the Park fine arts and crafts festival in Heckscher Park June 4 and 5 and for the Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce to hold its annual Networking Luau at Crabmeadow Beach on July 27. -- directed the Director of Planning and environment to seek and maintain Tree City USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation. -- scheduled a June 6 public heating on a proposal, using funds from the Environmental Open Space and Park Fund to acquire the Carpenter Farm, a 12-acresite on Old Fields Lane in Huntington, for passive parks uses, including hiking and nature observation, environmental science and community gardening. The property is across the street from Oldfields Middle School.

 


Real Estate Tax Payment Deadline Nears


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/22/2011

Huntington Tax Receiver Ester Bivona with some of the reminder notices being mailed to property owners that their real estate taxes are due by May 31.
 
Ester Bivona, Huntington Receiver of Taxes, would like to remind taxpayers that all 2010-2011 real estate taxes are due by May 31, 2011. Payments made after that date must be made to the county treasurer and must include interest and penalty. Senior citizens currently receiving a senior exemption pursuant to §467 of the Real Property Tax Law (income less than $37,400) and senior citizens currently receiving Enhanced Star, each related to their principal residence only, have until June 7, 2011 to pay their second half tax. Mrs. Bivona advises that all new owners of property, who are not paying their taxes through their mortgage payment, and those who have recently satisfied or refinanced a mortgage, should call the tax office at (631) 351-3217 if they do not have a bill for payment. Tax bills are issued in December each year. If you have lost or misplaced your bill, please contact the tax office. Penalties and interest cannot be waived because of non-receipt of a tax bill. In addition, mailing a tax payment does not guarantee receipt of the payment by the tax office, nor does it guarantee timely payment. Payments postmarked after May 31, 2011 will be forwarded to the county treasurer. The Huntington tax office hours are 8:00 am to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Payment hours during May are daily 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. The office will be open for payment on Tuesday, may 31, 2011 from 9:00 am until 7:00 pm. please note the office will be closed on Monday, May 30, 2011, and is not open on Saturdays.


 


Town Seeks Master Developer for Next Phase of Huntington Station Revitalization


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/20/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Town of Huntington today issued a Request for Qualifications for a Master Developer/Partner who can help devise and implement an action plan for the next phase of Huntington Station's revitalization. "The Town has made great strides in revitalizing Huntington Station over the past few years with a combination of public projects and private investment facilitated by the Town," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "As we head into the next phase, enlisting the expertise and professional contacts of a Master Developer should bring fresh ideas into this ongoing effort and help speed their implementation." The RFQ says the Town is seeking "experienced and knowledgeable real estate development organizations" that will assist the town with "development and redevelopment ideas and strategies to fulfill both existing revitalization concepts and in developing new ones." The RFQ also foresees the Master Developer helping to structure the strategic alliances or partnerships that will be needed to achieve the next level of revitalization. The Master Developer will work with the Town's Economic Development Corporation and Community Development Agency to develop a Phase II Action Plan that, as noted in the RFQ, will "complement, strengthen and build upon those redevelopments accomplished to date." Among those accomplishments are the streetscaping along New York Avenue, now in its second phase; the purchase of 1264-1268 New York Avenue and its transformation into the Huntington Station Enrichment Center, a dental office and a business incubator; three Take Back the Blocks projects, including the development of the Columbia Terrace affordable housing community; the Highview at Huntington housing development; the purchase and demolition of the former automobile repair shop at 1000 New York Avenue and its ongoing redevelopment; construction of a pedestrian plaza in front of 1000 New York Avenue; and creation of the Gateway Community Garden. Private projects facilitated by the Town include the Station Sports/Family Fun Recreation Center, the Huntington Station Food Plaza and the revitalization of the Big H Shopping Center that includes attracting eight national retailers. "A Master Developer, hopefully with the benefit of experience helping other communities, will advise the Town on how to create new, sustainable land use initiatives and what changes in Town codes and regulations we might need to enact to make them possible," Supervisor Petrone said. "At the same time, we expect the Master Developer will help us gather input from the community and help us achieve a consensus on where we go next." The responses to the RFQ are due June 1.

 


2011 Eggstravaganza a Rousing Success


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/20/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

6-year-old Georgia Meak and her brother, Greyson, four, join Town Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan Berland and Mark Mayoka; Billy and Joanne Ahern; and volunteers Schuyler and Grant Berland at Eggstravagnza at Heckscher Park.
 
Huntington, NY – Hundreds of children, ages one to eight, searched for 8,000 treat-filled eggs and participated in crafts and face painting today, making the Town of Huntington's second annual "Eggstravaganza" at Heckscher Park a rousing success. Sponsored by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson and his colleagues on the Town Board, the "Eggstravaganza" also collected three large cans of food items that will benefit the Huntington Community Food Council at 90 E. 5th Street in Huntington Station. In a change from last year's "Eggstravaganza," participants were asked to register in advance and bring their tickets for admittance. More than 450 responded. Children were grouped by ages to ensure that they all came away with eggs, which were donated by Ahern's Landscaping of Huntington.


 


Town Board Commends Workers for Saving a Life


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/14/2011

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and members of the Town Council, at the April 12 Town Board meeting, recognized four Environmental Waste Department employees whose quick actions saved the life of a co-worker who experienced heart problems while on the job last month. Refuse Laborer Carlo Ayala was on his regular collection route March 14 when he started to feel ill. His co-workers called their foremen and were told to bring him to the Department's facility at Boxer Court. After making it back to the office, Ayala collapsed in the men's room. Foremen John Hall, Don Taylor and Tony Murisco and Mechanic Al Snolis heard a "thud," ran into the men's room and found Ayala unconscious on the floor. After calling 911, they realized that Ayala was not breathing. Hall began to lead his co-workers in CPR. After there was still no response, the team hooked up an advanced electronic defibrillator to Ayala's chest. The AED advised them to administer a shock. Although still unconscious, Ayala began breathing on his own. An ambulance took Ayala to Huntington Hospital. He was later transferred to North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset. Ayala underwent surgery to have a stint placed in his heart. He was released from the hospital and is recovering. With Ayala looking on, Supervisor Petrone read the text of the proclamations presented to Hall, Taylor, Murisco and Snolis. The proclamations noted that "the quick action of the Environmental workers at Boxer Court, and their ability to work as a team, saved the life of Carlo Ayala" recognized their "heroic and life-saving efforts."


 


Huntington EECO Homes Partners with NYSERDA


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/13/2011

 
In celebration of Earth Day, Supervisor Frank Petrone and Councilman Mark Cuthbertson announced that Huntington is now partnering with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to help NYSERDA introduce its comprehensive Green Jobs-Green New York Better Buildings energy efficiency audit and low-interest retrofit financing program to Town residents. Last spring, the Town inaugurated Huntington EECO Homes, approved by U.S. Department of Energy, offering residents a free efficiency consultation by non-profit technical service provider LI Green. The company's technicians conduct in-home energy surveys and identify low-cost, high-impact retrofits that can be installed by the homeowner or LI Green to save energy and make homes more efficient and more comfortable. The Town said that by linking with NYSERDA, EECO Homes is now able to assist homeowners with comprehensive home energy improvements. EECO Homes will include a full review of NYSERDA Home Performance with Energy Star and GJGNY Better Buildings opportunities and help interested homeowners complete the NYSERDA application. NYSERDA provides qualified applicants free (or reduced cost) comprehensive Building Performance Institute home energy audits and up to $13,000 in low-interest retrofit financing for major improvements. "Huntington Town has a history of innovative programs," Supervisor Petrone said. "Hundreds of residents have already taken advantage of Huntington EECO Homes to identify fixes where a small investment can produce significant energy savings. Now we can aim higher." Councilman Cuthbertson said when the Town launched EECO homes, it anticipated that State and Federal programs for comprehensive retrofit financing would become available. "With Green Jobs Green New York," said Cuthbertson, "homeowners now have the chance to finance big-ticket retrofits that can yield energy savings in the range of 25 percent or more." Chuck Schwartz, the President of LI Green, said signing up for a free consultation is easy. "Families can visit www.eecohomes.org or call 631-721-1908. We will schedule a visit at your home with one our energy efficiency techicians. Together we'll determine the way to reduce your home energy bills that's best for you." All owners of residential homes in the Town of Huntington are eligible for a no-cost Huntington EECO Homes consultation. About Huntington EECO Homes Huntington EECO Homes is a residential energy program financed under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) that provides families that reside in Huntington Town a one-on-one consultation and home energy efficiency assessment. The program provides technical assistance on an individualized basis to homeowners that will allow them to work within their budgets, maximize energy efficiency and save money. At least 2000 families will receive these no-charge services. To learn more about EECO Homes or to sign up for your Free Home Energy Assessment go to www.eecohomes.org or call 8631-721-1908. The Huntington EECO Homes program is approved by the US Department of Energy and operated by the Town of Huntington under contract with technical services provider LI Green, a not for profit organization, based at the Stony Brook University Advanced Energy Center. All homeowners in Town of Huntington and its incorporated villages are eligible to participate. There are no income restrictions. Contact for more information: Chuck Schwartz LI Green 631-721-1908 chuck@ligreen.com www.ligreen.com About Green Jobs Green NY The Green Jobs - Green New York Better Buildings program is financed in part by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and operated by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). GJGNY Better Buildings provides New Yorkers with access to energy audits, installation services, low-interest energy retrofit financing. Free or low-cost energy audits through NYSERDA's Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program are available to residential customers. Eligible customers can implement cost-effective measures using GJGNY Financing, which offers loans of up to $13,000.

 


Town Awards contract for Major Traffic Improvements


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/13/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its April 12 meeting , approved the contract for a major upgrade of traffic signals on Larkfield Road and installation of a Centralized Traffic Control System that will allow the management of traffic signals throughout the town from Town Hall. Under the $1.822 million contract – almost entirely funded by federal and state grants – Welsbach Electric Corp. will upgrade or rebuild the traffic signals at eleven intersections along Larkfield Road, from Daly Road in Commack to Bellerose Avenue in East Northport. The Centralized Traffic Signal Control System will be able to accommodate all Town signalized intersections and allow the timing of traffic signals to be based on time-of-day/day-of-week or traffic responsive control. The system will allow the Town to manage traffic signals to improve air and noise quality, reduce vehicle emissions and delays and manage roadway capacity along Town roads. "Improving the flow of traffic helps everybody. Motorists get to their destinations more smoothly, pedestrians cross streets more safely and residents near the roads breathe cleaner air," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "This project will help bring state of the art technology to Huntington's traffic management and improve our environment." In other action, the Town Board: -- authorized the payment of compensation and expenses for the receiver appointed at the Town's request for the property at 3 Forest Court, Halesite. The partially completed property, which is an eyesore and presents a danger to neighbors, has been abandoned and in foreclosure for approximately three years and has been the subject of court action for violation of Town ordinances. -- authorized the inclusion of the Nathan Hale Monument adjacent to the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Building at 228 Main Street, Huntington, in the Culper Spy Ring Audio Tour. The Long Island North Shore Heritage Area Inc. is producing the tour, and the action by the Town Board allows installation of an appropriate site marker. -- approved $1.5 million in funding for upgrades to the harbor and dock at the Woodbine Marina in Northport, including dredging and installation of a wave baffle. -- reappointed members of the Harbors and Boating Advisory Council. -- scheduled public hearings for May 3 at 2 p.m. to consider extending the moratorium on approvals of cell phone towers and to consider amendments to the Town code with respect to cell phone towers.

 


Supervisor, Town Council Members Welcome Little Leaguers


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/11/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Dix Hills, NY – Huntington Supevisor Frank P. Petrone and Town Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan Berland and Glenda Jackson, joined by Suffolk County Legis. Steve Stern, welcomed participants in the Half Hollow Hills Little League to a successful 2011 season at the league's opening day parade and ceremony on Saturday, April 9, 2011, at the Town's Otsego Park. Supervisor Petrone, the Council Members and Legis. Stern met afterward with members of the Half Hollow Hills Lady Hawks, the 2010 9/10-year-old Section 6 Williamsport Softball Champions and New York State Finalists. They also commended Dix hills resident Sam Ferbin, who donated $1,170 of his bar mitzvah gifts to the league's Challenger Division. That division represents over 85 special needs children on six teams who play one game every week at Otesgo Park.


 


Petrone, Council Welcome New Supermarket to Huntington Station


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/8/2011

 
Huntington Station, NY – Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, members of the Town Council and local community leaders joined to welcome the Huntington Station Food Plaza, a full-service supermarket that opened today at 2035 New York Avenue. In remarks at the grand opening ceremony, Supervisor Petrone hailed the 20,000-square-foot supermarket as yet another milestone in Huntington Station's revitalization. Supervisor Petrone noted how store manager Javier Tineo – who owns the store with his father, Juan, and uncle, Porfirio, -- chose the name for the supermarket after meeting with the Huntington Station Business Improvement District and hearing of the BID's efforts to create a sense of community pride. "This is evidence of Xavier's desire and commitment, from the very beginning, to be a part of the good energy and work that is being done every day to help Huntington Station fulfill its potential," Supervisor Petrone said. This new retail establishment will serve specific needs of community residents as well as attracting shoppers from outside the area and serve as an example for other businesses that might want to locate in Huntington Station. Town officials have long supported this project and helped facilitate the supermarket's opening. The project was aided by a $2,500 grant from the Huntington Economic Development Corp., which was matched by the Huntington Station BID. The $5,000, along with technical and administrative assistance from the Huntington Community Development Agency, is being used toward the exterior landscaping. The EDC also has helped the project through the Planning and Engineering phases, as it does for other Huntington Station projects that hold great promise to revitalize the area and at the same time bring the types of goods and/or services highly requested by the community. The Tineo family also operates two supermarkets in Brooklyn and one in Queens. Huntington Station Food Plaza is the largest of the four and – if pressed – Xavier Tineo will also admit it is the nicest.


 


Petrone, Mayoka Recognize American Red Cross for Japan Relief Efforts


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/6/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilman Mark Mayoka, joined by their Town Board colleagues, formally commended the American Red Cross for its relief efforts to help the victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan. "The degree and extent of the damage caused by the earthquake and resulting tsunami were enormous," the Town Board noted in a proclamation presented to Priscilla Lee, director of financial development for the Red Cross' Suffolk County Chapter. The proclamation said that the American Red Cross "has demonstrated through their generous financial support and humanitarian efforts the compassion of the American people to help the hundreds of thousands of lives that will forever be changed by this disaster." The proclamation additionally noted that the American Red Cross has been helping families and communities during times of disaster, war and hardship since its formation over 100 years ago. The proclamation added that the Huntington regional Chapter has been serving the Town since 1917, responding to disasters whenever they occur, supplying food, clothing and shelter to help our neighbors.


 


Petrone Welcomes Suffolk County Planning Commission


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 4/6/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, stressing the need for a regional approach, asked the Suffolk County Planning Commission to consider the infrastructure effects of the Heartland Town Square project proposed for an Islip location adjacent to the Huntington border. "That project can be very beneficial, but it can also devastate," Supervisor Petrone told the Commission, which held its regular meeting at Huntington Town Hall today and invited the Supervisor to speak. The Supervisor said that the Town was particularly concerned about the project's potential effect on traffic along Commack Road and noted that the Town has retained the consulting firm Greenman-Pedersen Engineering and Construction Services to review the project's environmental impact statement, focusing on traffic issues. The Supervisor offered to share Greenman-Pedersen's findings with the Commission. In his remarks to the Commission, Supervisor Petrone detailed how Huntington has considered infrastructure improvements as central to the Town's economic development initiatives in areas such as the Melville Corporate Center (with improvements to Walt Whitman Road and the Long Island Expressway Service Road). Supervisor Petrone also highlighted recent progress in Huntington Station revitalization programs, including the redevelopment of 1000 New York Avenue, and updated the Commission on the recently resubmitted Avalon Bay at Huntington Station proposal.


 


Huntington Town Board to Recognize Teen Poets


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/31/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
On Wednesday, April 27, the Huntington Town Board will recognize teen poets from the community recently selected for participation in the Town's Poetry for the HART Public Art Initiative. The event will begin at 7 p.m. at the Walt Whitman Birthplace (246 Old Walt Whitman Rd., West Hills), with the winning teen poets receiving certificates from members of the Huntington Town Board. Following the ceremony, there will be a reading led by "The Robin and the Lady Poet" (a poetry & performance duo) at which each of the winning teens will read their winning poems. After the reading there will be a brief reception honoring the teen poets. The award ceremony, reading, and reception are free and open to the public. "The Robin and the Lady Poet" is a hybrid-mix of music, poetry and performance presented by singer/songwriter and performer Robin Andre and poet and performer Erica Miriam Fabri, two NYC-based artists and partners in love. Robin Andre is a Brooklyn-born singer-songwriter, performer and recording artist. He was signed to RCA records for his debut album "Paper Bag" and has recorded, performed and toured in 32 different countries with multi-platinum artists such as The Dave Matthews Band, The Fugees, Mariah Carey, Lil Flip and Inaya Day. His solo work is a tight blend of rock, hip-hop and reggae sensibility. His newest hit-sensation single, "Betty," is featured on itunes and he recently completed filming the colorful and funky music video by director Jose Infante. He has also starred in off-Broadway musical theater productions, and worked as a commercial actor and professional dancer. He writes, performs and tours solo as well as in the duo "The Robin and the Lady Poet" and also can be seen performing live every week with the iconic house band at the legendary "Village Underground" in New York City's Greenwich Village. Erica Miriam Fabri is the author of "Dialect of a Skirt." She is a writer and performer and a graduate of The American Academy of Dramatic Arts. She received her MFA in Poetry from The New School. Her work has been published in numerous journals and magazines and she has facilitated workshops and seminars at Cooper Union School of the Arts, New York University, Columbia University and Pennsylvania State University. She has worked on projects as a writer, editor and performance director for The New York Knicks, HBO and Nickelodeon Television. Erica has been awarded a writer's residency at the Omega Institute, has been a featured and/or visiting poet/performer for drug rehabilitation centers, prisons and hospitals. Her first book, "Dialect of a Skirt," was included on the list for: The Best Books of 2009 at About.com and made the Small Press Distribution's bestseller list for June 2010 as well as the Poetry Foundation's bestseller list for October 2010. She is currently a spoken word mentor and curriculum writer for Urban Word NYC, a non-for-profit organization dedicated to bringing spoken word, poetry and hip-hop arts to inner-city teens. She also teaches Performance Poetry at Pace University, Creative Writing at The School of Visual Arts and a variety of Poetry courses at Baruch College and Hunter College of The City University of New York (CUNY). Poetry for the HART is a Huntington Public Art Initiative developed by the Town's Public Art Advisory Committee in conjunction with Teenspeak, which suggested the project to the Town. Teens in the community from ages 14-18 were invited last fall to submit poems for consideration in the program. This spring a selection panel comprised of the poets Dr. Richard Bronson and Barbara Reiher-Meyers, as well as James Metcalfe, a member of Huntington's Public Art Advisory Committee, reviewed the 138 different submissions and narrowed the choices to the 20 winning poems. Additional partners in this project included Heckscher Museum of Art; Huntington Arts Council; The Long Islander, which has pledged to publish the winning poems; REACH CYA; Town of Huntington Youth Bureau; Tri-Community Youth Agency; the award reception host – Walt Whitman Birthplace Association; and Youth Directions & Alternatives CYA, as well as numerous area teachers who actively encouraged their students' participation. Subsequent to the ceremonies, colorful placards, each bearing one of the winning youth poems, will be placed in the interior advertising spaces on buses throughout the HART system. The names of the winning teen poets and text of their winning poems will be available following the April 27 event. For further information on Poetry for the HART or other Town of Huntington Public Art Initiative projects, contact John Coraor, Director of Cultural Affairs, at 631-351-3099 or via e-mail: jcoraor@town.huntington.ny.us.

 


Hearing Set on Avalon Bay Rezoning Request


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/23/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its March 22 meeting, set a May 16 public hearing on a request by Avalon Bay Communities for a rezoning that will allow construction of a 379-unit housing development in Huntington Station. In a proposal filed with the Town last month, Avalon Bay sought to have the 26-acre parcel on East Fifth Street rezoned from its current R-7 Residence District classification, which would allow construction of 109 single family homes, to R-3M Garden Apartment District, which would allow construction of the 379-unit, combination of rental and owner-occupied housing project. "We encouraged Avalon Bay to submit a new plan in response to public comments about their previous proposal," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "I look forward to this project progressing and becoming a significant contributor to Huntington Station's revitalization." "Avalon Bay has amended its application substantially," Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said. "Although, unfortunately, some of the much needed affordable units were lost, I commend the developer for coming back and look forward to the upcoming hearing." In other action, the Town Board: -- approved hiring the Poughkeepsie law firm of Lewis & Greer and the Albany consulting company Industrial & Utility Valuation Consultants to assist the Town in its defense of the Long Island Power Authority's lawsuit challenging the assessment on the Northport Power Plant. "Both firms are experts when it comes to tax certiorari cases involving utilities and will provide invaluable assistance as the Town vigorously fights this lawsuit," said Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, who has also asked Town residents to sign an on-line petition asking for a Huntington representative on the LIPA board. -- amended Town Code to remove a restriction on where game centers and commercial places of amusement can be located, reducing from 2,000 feet to 200 feet the minimum distance between a game center and a school, library, church, hospital or similar public or semipublic use. The amendment will help speed Huntington Station businessman Brad Rosen's proposal to construct an outdoor miniature golf course, outdoor batting range and indoor sports simulator center on Depot Road, between 3rd and 4th Streets, a project that will help further Huntington Station's revitalization. -- authorized an extension – but at a greatly reduced cost – of the contract with Omni Recycling of Westbury to process, dispose and sell household containers collected for recycling. The Town collects approximately 4,500 tons a year of glass bottles, metal cans and plastic bottles and under the new contract will pay $31.50 a ton, down from the $42.25 a ton paid in 2010. The reduced rate is expected to save the Town $28,617 annually. -- approved hiring Greenman-Pedersen Engineering and Construction Services to review the environmental impact statement for the proposed Heartland Town Square Development project in the Town of Islip. "The immense development project is proposed for property on the Islip-Huntington border, and it is important that the environmental impact statement adequately identify and assess the project's potentially significant effect on Huntington residents," councilman Mark Mayoka said. -- authorized transferring a total of $1.09 million from snow contingency accounts to cover the additional costs of snow removal because of the four major snowstorms in January and February. -- approved a continuation of the arrangement that allows for a Farmers Market in a portion of the Town municipal parking lot on Elm Street for the harvest season from May 22 to November 20, 2011. The market will continue to operate on Sundays from 7 a.m. to noon. -- approved retaining Gannett Fleming engineers to implement Phase II planning services, including specific review and analysis of the remediation required at 1345 New York Ave., Huntington Station, under a $240,000 state Brownfields opportunity Area Grant. -- approved the transfer of the former Naval Reserve property on New York Avenue to the State so the planned drainage and roadway improvement project can proceed. The Town continues to challenge as insufficient the State's offer of $2.623 million for the property. -- extended the time to make a determination on a proposed zoning change for property at the intersection of Route 25A and Centershore Road in Centerport. The owner of the property has requested a change to allow the construction of nine attached dwelling units in two buildings. This is the fourth time an extension has been granted on the application.

 


Petrone Helps Celebrate A 100th Birthday


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/15/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Commack, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone recently joined staff and members at the Suffolk Y Jewish Community Center in celebrating the 100th birthday of Anne Spunberg, a longtime participant at the JCC and in programs sponsored there by the Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA). The ceremony marked the first time a 100th birthday had been celebrated at the JCC. Anne was born in the United States. Her parents had emigrated from Russia. She was one of four children. She has two children, four grandchildren and eleven great grandchildren. She lived in Queens and worked as a head bookkeeper in Manhattan until she retired and moved to Florida. She moved back to New York eight years ago to live with her daughter in Dix Hills. Anne says she played the stock market successfully and attributed her success to "just being smart". Anne gets her exercise by walking back and forth the length of the main corridor of the JCC eight times a day. Everyone at the JCC knows her and marvels at this spry 100 years-young woman. She says that one has to be a mensch – "you mustn't go up or down, just straight ahead." Supervisor Petrone presented Anne with a proclamation from the Town Board congratulating her on her centennial and wishing her many more happy and productive years.


 


Town Employees Contribute to Cancer Research


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/14/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Town of Huntington employees contributed $1,555 towards cancer research recently by participating in the American Cancer Society's 2011 Daffodil Days Campaign, the 26th year Town employees have taken part in the event. As part of the fundraiser, 103 Town employees purchased daffodils – the first flower of Spring and a universal symbol of hope – as a colorful reminder that people are surviving cancer every day. Six Town employees purchased a bunch of daffodils and a stuffed toy bear, and 25 employees donated gifts of hope. At the March 8 meeting, Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and members of the Town Council presented a proclamation presented to Ann K. Thorsen, senior director of special events for the American Cancer Society, declaring March Daffodil Days Month. Huntington Town Clerk Jo-Ann Raia, former Vice-President of the American Cancer Society's Huntington Unit, joined the Town Board in presenting the proclamation The proclamation noted that Daffodil Days has the power to supply more than $2 million dollars in cancer research on Long Island and to help 13,000 newly-diagnosed cancer patients on Long Island cope with their disease through support groups, rehabilitation and other vital patient services. Additionally, the proclamation noted, Daffodil Days has the power to reach more than 150,000 Long Islanders with lifesaving prevention and early detection programs and to answer more than 7,000 phone calls for information and counseling through the Society's toll-free Cancer Information Line (800) ACS-2345.


 


Town Demolishes Abandoned Huntington Station Eyesore


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/11/2011

Supervisor Petrone holds copy of RFP for development of 1000 New York Avenue
 
Huntington Station, NY – In a major milestone in Huntington Station's revitalization, the Town of Huntington today began demolition of the abandoned automobile repair shop at 1000 New York Avenue and announced issuance of a Request for Proposals to develop the site. The demolition of the decade-long eyesore, funded through part of a state grant, follows the Town's acquisition of the property through eminent domain last year. The redevelopment of the site will occur in coordination with the Town's construction of a pedestrian plaza in front of the parcel at New York Avenue and Olive Street "Today's action puts us on the fast track to redeveloping this parcel. We have eliminated this symbol of area blight, and look forward to creative proposals from developers who see the potential this location has for commercial development," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. The Town has been trying for some time to encourage the redevelopment of the property and secured a $1.17 million State Restore NY Communities grant to assist in the demolition and construction of a 10,800-square foot mixed-use, retail and residential building. When a formal agreement with the owner of the property could not be reached, the Town started the process to acquire the property. The Town took title to the property in October; asbestos and lead paint removal was recently completed. The RFP offers two options for potential developers: submit a proposal for building the 10,800-square foot mixed-use building – making the project eligible for reimbursement of construction costs up to $1.07 million-- or submit another proposal for a commercial building, for which applicability of the grant money is possible but not certain. The RFP notes, "The ideal redevelopment should include neighborhood friendly and/or convenience retail uses that attract patronage of the businesses and enjoyment of the adjacent pedestrian plaza." The RFP says that the chosen private developer will purchase the site from the Town for $535,000, the price the Town paid for the property through eminent domain. The Town has scheduled a March 25 informational conference and site visit for interested developers; the due date for proposals is May 25. The property is central to the Town's redevelopment plans, which includes transformation of a 17,000-square foot right of way in front of the parcel into the pedestrian-friendly, aesthetically pleasing public plaza. The Town is working with the State Department of Transportation to obtain the permits necessary to construct the plaza. "This property has been a blight on the community for the past decade and we can now move forward in attracting commercial developers and businesses to invest in the future of this tarnished parcel," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. "The razing of 1000 New York Ave is a huge step towards the revitalization of Huntington Station," said Councilwoman Susan Berland. "That property has been an eyesore and a blight on the community for years. I am looking forward to the redevelopment of the property and to the building of the public plaza on New York Avenue." " With this blight removed we can focus on commercial development opportunities for future business," said Councilwoman Glenda Jackson. "I am optimistic about this revitalization project in Huntington Station," Councilman Mark Mayoka said. "This directly impacts the 'Gateway Corridor' between Jericho Turnpike and Fairview Street. I am eager for this project to commence in order to address the blight in the area and to help restore Huntington Station to the commercial downtown area that it once was." The Restore NY grant is the second the Town has received. The Town also received a $1.56 million grant to acquire three lots on nearby Columbia Street and build 16 affordable housing units as part of the "Take Back the Blocks" program that is another element of the Town's Huntington Station redevelopment plans. Dilapidated houses on the three acquired lots were demolished last Fall. Both projects are part of the broader Huntington Station redevelopment initiative that the Town's Economic Development Corp, has been working on for several years. The revitalization has also included redevelopment of the Big H Shopping Center, construction of the Highview at Huntington affordable housing project and plans to reclaim brownfields sites. "With the help of funds from the Restore New York grant this project will help strengthen property values, and promote economic development across Huntington Station. It is important that we work to put eyesores back on the tax rolls and make them community assets rather than letting them eat away at the heart of our villages," said State Sen. Carl L. Marcellino "In these tough budgetary times, it is imperative that all levels of government must work together to try to improve our community. The facts are simply that there is a great need, the Town developed a good proposal, and I am glad that I was able to help secure State monies to continue to help revitalize Huntington Station." said Assemblyman James Conte "The Restore NY program can make the critical difference in attracting private sector resources to key areas suffering from a lack of investment and the associated problems," said Andrea Lohneiss, Long Island Regional Director for Empire State Development, which administers the restore NY program. "Empire State Development is pleased that the Town of Huntington has reached this important milestone, which is so critical to revitalization of the Huntington Station community."


 


Huntington Asks State to Protect STAR Property Tax Relief


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/9/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its March 8 meeting, formally asked the State Legislature to revise a process that could see up to 5,000 Town homeowners lose their BASIC STAR property tax relief because the State has been unable to determine their income. In a unanimous resolution, the Town Board said the State Department of Taxation and Finance used unreliable data, incomplete records and a faulty computerized process to question whether the 5,000 property owners should lose their BASIC STAR benefit, either because their incomes are greater than the $500,000 cap or because their income could not be determined. The Town Board believes the process could have produced erroneous conclusions and substantial errors. . "We are concerned that the State may take away the BASIC STAR property tax relief from moderate- and low-income property owners who depend on it to help make ends meet," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said, "We are asking the Legislature to step in and establish a framework that will help ensure that persons eligible for the exemption are not unfairly removed." Originally, the State placed the burden of determining income eligibility on local assessors, who would have had to obtain and review income tax returns. The State recently changed the requirement so that assessors must collect the Social Security numbers of the owners and report them to a State website so an eligibility determination can be made. "Even that places an unfair burden on local assessors," Supervisor Petrone said. "It is one more unfunded mandate that Towns do not need." Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, who sponsored the resolution, said, "The Town of Huntington must now collect personal and sensitive information from our constituents, such as Social Security numbers, to aid in determining a resident's BASIC STAR eligibility. The State needs to put a new mechanism in place that would deter collecting this sensitive information from the filing process and provide extensions to those who fell victim to the quirks of the new system." In other action, the Town Board: -- approved the purchase of the sculpture Dress Armor by artist Thea Lanzisero for display in the Anne Frank Memorial Garden in Dix Hills. The work has been on temporary display at the Memorial Garden for the past year. The cost of the sculpture is $7,600. "I am very pleased that Thea Lanzisero's sculpture, Dress Armor, will be a permanent installation at the Anne Frank Memorial Garden," said Councilwoman Susan Berland, a sponsor of the resolution. "The sculpture was chosen by the Public Arts Advisory Committee as a symbol of the elegance, poise and determination Anne Frank maintained as she endured the horrors of the Holocaust. It is a very moving and appropriate component to the Anne Frank Memorial Garden that residents will be able to appreciate for years to come." -- approved a contract with Terry Contracting and Materials Inc. to repair the gas vent pipes, wellheads and gas transmission lines damaged by the July 7, 2010 brush fire at the East Northport Landfill and to restore vegetation damaged by the fire. The contract is for an amount not to exceed $308,270, of which it is estimated $200,000 will be covered by insurance. The project will keep the Town in compliance with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation requirements. -- amended the Town Code to establish a multiple residence registry, require inspection of residences in the registry every three years to ensure compliance with Town standards and regulations and to establish inspection fees. -- approved a one-year, $33,000 contract with Organic Golf Maintenance and Design Inc. for engineering design services to continue the reconstruction of tees and bunkers at the Dix Hills Golf Course. The contract will cover holes two, three and four, the final three holes on the nine-hole course to be renovated. -- approved a $19,776 contract with the Deck and Patio Co. for design and construction of a rainwater harvesting garden at the corner of Broadway and New York Avenue at the Huntington Long Island Rail Road Station -- accepted donations of a scoreboard and associated materials at Veterans Park in East Northport from the Louis J. Acampora Foundation and a sound system at the Dix Hills Ice Rink from the Long Island Rebels Youth Hockey Club. -- approved a three-year contract with Cornell Cooperative Extension to run a shellfish enhancement and educational internship program at Gold Star Battalion Beach. The cost in the first year of the contract is $52,062. -- scheduled an April 12 public hearing on a proposed zone change that will allow construction of 16 units of affordable housing on Columbia Street as part of the Take Back the Blocks program. "The Take Back the Blocks program is an integral component of the Huntington Station revitalization process," stated Councilwoman Glenda Jackson. " This public hearing regarding a zone change is a necessary step at bringing 16 proposed units of affordable housing to fruition on Columbia Street," added Jackson. -- appointed members of the Building Homes for Huntington Heroes committee. " I am proud to be able to commence our Building Homes For Huntington Heroes Committee in order to assist our first Huntington Hero, returning Marine Corps Platoon Commander Lieutenant James Byler," said Councilman Mark Mayoka, who sponsored the resolution. "We embrace community participation and look forward to beginning the construction project."

 


Huntington Raises Flag for Red Cross Month


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/9/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone was joined by Town Clerk JoAnn Raia, Tax Receiver Ester Bivona and Town Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan Berland, Glenda Jackson and Mark Mayoka in raising the Red Cross flag at Town Hall to mark March as Red Cross Month. Helping the Huntington officeholders was Sallie Williams, head of disaster services for the American Red Cross' Huntington Region.


 


Search Warrants Uncover More Illegal Apartments


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/7/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY – Town of Huntington Code Enforcement officers, in coordination with the Suffolk County Police Department, executed search warrants last week at three Huntington Station houses, finding illegal apartments at all three locations. The Code Enforcement Officers issued a total of 10 summonses and 10 notices of violation The actions represented the fifth time in the past nine months that Code Enforcement Officers, as part of the Town's crackdown on illegal apartments, have executed search warrants at various locations, and brought the total number of summonses issued at the locations inspected as a result of the warrants to 48. All told, since the code enforcement crackdown began in October 2009, almost 700 summonses and 2,500 notices of violation have been issued, and more than 550 investigations have been conducted into suspected illegal apartments. "Our resolve to enforce Town Codes aggressively remains high," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "We continue to dedicate resources to pursue the legal means at out disposal to crack down on illegal apartments and quality of life violations." At 59 6th Avenue, Huntington Station, summonses were issued for an illegal first floor apartment, an illegal temporary apartment and for failing to register the apartment, as required by Town Code. Notices of violation were issued for interior door locks and missing smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. At 47A 9th Avenue, Huntington Station, summonses were issued for an illegal first level apartment, interior alterations without a permit, failing to register the apartment and for an unregistered vehicle and litter and debris. Notices of violation were issued for missing smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. At 76 E. 3rd St., Huntington Station, summonses were issued for an illegal second level apartment, interior alterations without a permit and failure to register the apartment. Notices of violation were issued for missing smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, interior door locks and overcrowding. The Code Enforcement officers placed a hazardous conditions notice on the building because of overcrowding upstairs and the improper use of the basement for sleeping. These efforts are an outgrowth of the Code Enforcement Task Force Supervisor Petrone formed as an outgrowth of the Huntington Station Action Coalition. The task force, which uses 40 percent of the Town's code enforcement officers, is based at the Town's Community Outreach Center on Lowndes Avenue.

 


Petrone Reads to Pre-K Class


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 3/3/2011

Supervisor Petrone is joined by teacher Jennifer Gulino, teacher’s aide Maggie Castro and students
 
Huntington Station, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone recently visited the Family Service League's Universal Pre Kindergarten, reading students the book "Spring Changes" and engaging them in a discussion about Spring. "I was impressed by the children's observations and their questions," Supervisor Petrone said. "I hope the children enjoyed our time together as much as I did." The class was part of an effort in which the Family Service League partners with the Huntington and South Huntington School Districts to provide a program for four-year-olds.


 


TOWN HALL TO BE CLOSED FEBRUARY 21, 2011


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/16/2011

 
Town Hall will be closed on Monday, February 21, 2011, in observance of Presidents' Day.

 


TOWN HALL TO BE CLOSED ON FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/9/2011

 
Town Hall will be closed on Friday, February 11, 2011, in observance of Lincoln's Birthday.

 


Town Releases Response Video


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/7/2011

 
Supervisor Petrone would like to call your attention to this Town-produced video, which corrects and clarifies an erroneous video recently circulated on YouTube and elsewhere on the Internet: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVzmoqfR9Uc.

 


Board Sets Hearing on Game Center Code Revision


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 2/2/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its meeting Tuesday night, set a March 8 public hearing on an amendment to the Town's Zoning Code that will help speed the approval process for a new, private enterprise that will help further Huntington Station's revitalization. The amendment would remove a restriction on where game centers and commercial places of amusement can be located, although the centers will still have to obtain a special use permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals. The proposed amendment also reduces from 2,000 feet to 200 feet the minimum distance between a game center and a school, library, church, hospital or similar public or semipublic use. If approved, the changes would allow Huntington Station businessman Brad Rosen's proposal to construct an outdoor miniature golf course, outdoor batting range and indoor sports simulator center on Depot Road, between 3rd and 4th Streets, in Huntington Station. Rosen recently detailed his proposal to Town officials, who enthusiastically support it, and he has also received a favorable reaction from community members, the Huntington Economic Development Corp. and the Huntington Station Business Improvement District, of which he is an officer. "Brad and the Town have been speaking for some time about potential uses for this property, and we believe this proposal is a real winner," said Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, who sponsored the resolution." On many levels, this type of facility is just what Huntington Station needs: an infusion of private funding to build a business that will attract people to the community day and night and encourage other commercial enterprises to locate nearby. Brad has an ambitious timetable – he wants to open up in early summer – and the Town wants to do what it can to help him meet his timetable." The resolution setting the public hearing, which will be held at 2 p.m. on March 8, notes that the restriction on where game centers could be located was enacted at a time when video game arcades were the most common type of game centers, and they were associated with undesirable impacts such as school vagrancy. However, the resolution notes that the widespread availability of home video game systems has made video game arcades obsolete; most game centers and places of amusement today are associated with family or group activity. "That is just the type of activity we want to encourage in Huntington Station," Supervisor Petrone said. In other action, the Town Board: -- approved a 90-day moratorium on public hearings, approvals, grants and permits for cell phone towers, allowing the Town to consider the first comprehensive revisions to the cell phone section of the Town Code since it was enacted in 1998. Said Councilwoman Glenda Jackson, sponsor of the measure, "Increasingly, the arguments from both proponents and opponents of a particular application are becoming more concerned in their comments and looking to the Town to apply their version of what the standards should be. This moratorium will allow us to assess what factors should be included in considering an application and to update our Code to incorporate current scientific findings and address community concerns." -- amended the Town code to allow taxi cabs to carry rooftop advertising signs. "In these difficult economic times, allowing taxicab companies to provide rooftop advertising space will help to increase transportation revenues for local cab companies in addition to keeping transportation costs reasonable for residents," said Councilwoman Susan Berland, who sponsored the measure. -- granted a license agreement to NY Islanders Iceworks to operate the Pro Shop at the Dix Hills Park Twin Ice Rinks. "We're happy to welcome the New York Islanders as an important addition to the Dix Hills Ice Rink and look forward to a long, productive relationship with Long Island's major league sports franchise," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. -- established a Building Homes for Huntington Heroes Committee. "During this tumultuous period, I believe it is essential for the community within the Town of Huntington to unite and to embrace the severely injured and disabled Huntington men and women of the United States Military as they begin their struggle with post-war life. I am humbled to be able to assist and form the ‘Building Homes For Huntington Heroes Committee,' who shall assist returning veterans who were injured while serving their Country with housing and handicap accessible issues," said Councilman Mark Mayoka, who sponsored the resolution with Supervisor Petrone. -- approved transferring $290,000 from the Highway Department contingency account to replenish the Town's inventory of sand and salt. Because of the number of large storms, the supply was depleted much faster than in previous years. -- authorized a $672,333 contract with D.F. Stone Contracting for the brownfields remediation program at the Veteran Nature Study Area, an undeveloped three-acre parcel within the 34 acres in Northport donated to the Town by the Veterans Administration. The area includes a former solid waste disposal area. Funding is from a State program.

 


TOWN HALL OPENING DELAYED. HART BUS CHANGES


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/27/2011

 
Because of the storm, Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone declared a delayed opening for Town Hall today, Thursday, January 27, 2011. Town Hall will open at 10:30 a.m. Additionally, all HART Paratransit service is cancelled for today. Fixed Route service start will be delayed until 8 a.m.

 


CLOSINGS FOR FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/27/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Two senior clubs -- the Larkfield Club and the Wolf Hill Club -- will not meet on Friday, January 28, 2011. In addition, the Cane and Rushing Class scheduled at the Senior Beach House in Centerport is also cancelled.

 


PETRONE LIFTS SNOW EMERGENCY


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/27/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone today lifted the order declaring a snow emergency in the Town, effective 2 p.m. "I have toured the Town and found that for the most part, the cleanup is progressing. While we ask motorists to continue to use caution, the conditions necessitating a snow emergency no longer exist," Supervisor Petrone said. Supervisor Petrone issued the original order effective 5 p.m. yesterday. Under a snow emergency, the Supervisor has the power to close roads, appropriate necessary equipment from all sources and make necessary purchases without following the usual procedures. The declaration also makes available to the highway department Town equipment and personnel to assist highway department crews. Supervisor Petrone also asked residents to clear the snow away from fire hydrants on their property so they can be located quickly in an emergency.

 


Petrone Declares Snow Emergency Starting Tonight


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/26/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
In expectation of a major storm affecting the area starting tonight, Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone declared an official snow emergency, effective at 5 p.m., and announced the cancellation of events scheduled for tonight at Town facilities. Supervisor Petrone also ordered the Town's Emergency Operations Center to open at 6 p.m. to help coordinate communications among Town departments and fire and rescue services. Representatives from several Town departments with key emergency responsibilities were told to report to the Center, in the Town's general services facility on Pulaski Road in Huntington Station. "We have been tracking the storm, and it is now clear that a significant snowfall will occur starting later this evening," Supervisor Petrone said. "I am declaring a snow emergency now, before we feel the brunt of the storm, to let our residents make appropriate plans and to put Town workers on notice they might be needed at any time to assist in dealing with the storm's effects." Under a snow emergency, the Supervisor has the power to close roads, appropriate necessary equipment from all sources and make necessary purchases without following the usual procedures. The declaration also makes available to the Highway Department Town equipment and personnel to assist Highway Department crews. "Residents should feel confident that the Town will do whatever it takes to ensure, as best as possible, that roads are passable and necessary services are being provided," Supervisor Petrone said. "I hope, however, that people will stay off the roads, if possible." At present, no roads are expected to be closed. Among the programs cancelled for tonight are the co-ed soccer league at Coindre Hall. The public skate at the Dix Hills Ice Rink will end at 5:15 p.m.; the rink will remain open for private groups that had rented ice time. All Town youth programs are canceled, as is the Affordable Housing Advisory Board meeting scheduled for 4 p.m. today. Supervisor Petrone also announced that the Senior Center (including Senior Day Care), the Satellite Nutrition Center at St. Hugh's of Lincoln R.C. Church and the Senior Beach House at Centerport Beach will be closed tomorrow, Thursday, January 27. Affected by that closure are two scheduled art classes; individuals registered for the classes are being notified. Also canceled are scheduled Thursday meetings for three senior clubs – Harborfields, Hills and Old Fields. Home meal delivery is also cancelled for tomorrow; participants in the program received double meals today. Two HART bus routes, H-9 and H-4, are running modified snow routes. Other routes are running as scheduled. All non-essential HART Paratransit trips have been cancelled for tomorrow. Essential trips are for employment, doctor's appoitments and dialysis. All others are non-essential. Refuse pickup remains as scheduled, although that could change depending on the effects of the storm. Supervisor Petrone advised residents to check the Town's website, http://town.huntington.ny.us, the Town's Facebook page or government access channels 18 (Cablevision) and 38 (FIOS) for updates. The Supervisor also reminds residents that anyone needing to contact the Town should call 351-3234 for emergencies.

 


Huntington Sets 24th Annual Black History Month Celebration


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/25/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
An address by a distinguished jurist and the release of a booklet marking the life of the first African-American published poet will highlight the Town's 24th Annual Black History Month Celebration on Thursday, Feb. 3 at 7 p.m. The keynote address will be delivered by Deborah A. Dowling, who since 1996 has served as a New York State Supreme Court justice, sitting in Brooklyn. Justice Dowling has also worked as a staff attorney for the Legal Services Corporation, serving as director of its Housing Unit, and as a judge of the New York City Housing Court and the New York City Civil Court. She currently chairs the Kings County Supreme Court Criminal Term Forum, and is also a member of the Board of Directors of the Judicial Friends Foundation. Justice Dowling's foundation is shaped by her reliance upon her faith. She has been a member of the Bethlehem Baptist Church since childhood, and is a former Sunday School teacher. At a very young age she was instilled with a sense of responsibility to her community. She believes she has a particular obligation to the youth of the community and has vowed to create a better society for them. Because of her beliefs in bringing the community together she has for a number of years been an active participant in the program Not Just Blacks and Jews in Conversation. As part of this group, she has gone to many college universities and high schools to discuss various topics of racial, religious, gender and ethnicity issues. She has also spoken at many churches, civic group functions and has participated in numerous educational programs. The booklet, the fourth issued by the Town's African American Historic Designation Council, spotlights the life and works of Jupiter Hammon, America's first African American published poet. Hammon (1722-1806) was born in what is now Lloyd Harbor and lived there and on West Shore Road in Huntington. The booklet traces his family's history and includes samples of his poems. Copies of the booklet will be available at the celebration. The celebration, which will be held at Town Hall, will include music and refreshments. The public is welcomed to attend. For further information, contact Denise Williams, Director of Minority Affairs, (631) 351-2842, dwilliams@town.huntington.ny.us

 


PETRONE TO LIFT SNOW EMERGENCY


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/12/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone today announced he will lift the order declaring a snow emergency in the Town, effective 5 p.m. Wednesday, January 12, 2011. "I have toured the Town and found that for the most part, the cleanup is progressing. While we ask motorists to continue to use caution, the restrictions imposed by a state of emergency are no longer necessary," Supervisor Petrone said. Supervisor Petrone issued the original order effective 11 p.m. yesterday. Under a snow emergency, the Supervisor has the power to close roads, appropriate necessary equipment from all sources and make necessary purchases without following the usual procedures. The declaration also makes available to the highway department Town equipment and personnel to assist highway department crews.

 


PETRONE DECLARES SNOW EMERGENCY STARTING TONIGHT


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/11/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
In expectation of a major storm affecting the area overnight, Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone declared an official snow emergency, effective at 11 p.m. tonight, and announced that the opening of Town Hall tomorrow would be delayed until 10:30 a.m. Supervisor Petrone also announced that there will be no recycling pickup of bottles and cans tomorrow. Instead, residents will have two pickups on their next regular refuse collection day – one for garbage in the morning and one for recyclables in the afternoon. "We have been tracking the storm, and it is now clear that a significant snowfall will occur overnight," Supervisor Petrone said. "I am declaring a snow emergency now, effective later tonight, to let our residents make appropriate plans and to put Town workers on notice they might be needed at any time to assist in dealing with the storm's effects." Under a snow emergency, the Supervisor has the power to close roads, appropriate necessary equipment from all sources and make necessary purchases without following the usual procedures. The declaration also makes available to the Highway Department Town equipment and personnel to assist Highway Department crews. The Supervisor also ordered the Town's Emergency Operations Center to open at 11 p.m. Representatives from several Town departments with key emergency responsibilities were told to report to the Center, in the Town's general services facility on Pulaski Road in Huntington Station. "Residents should feel confident that the Town will do whatever it takes to ensure, as best as possible, that roads are passable and necessary services are being provided," Supervisor Petrone said. "I hope, however, that people will stay off the roads until the storm is over." The Supervisor reminds residents that anyone needing to contact the Town should call 351-3234 for emergencies.

 


Senior Center, Parks Department Closings Because of Expected Snow


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/11/2011

 
The following Town facilities and programs will be closed tomorrow because of the expected storm: The Senior Center along with Adult Day Care, the Satellite at St. Hughes, and the Beach House will be closed. Seniors who participate in the Home Delivered Meal Program received two meals today to cover tomorrow in anticipation of the snow. Early morning skating sessions at the Dix Hills Ice Rink have been canceled. The rink will have a delayed opening, weather permitting, at 10:30 a.m. The Co-Ed Soccer League at Coindre Hall has been canceled. Teams are being notified.

 


Parks and Recreation Moves Temporarily to Dix Hills Golf Course Clubhouse


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/7/2011
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Due to office renovations at Town Hall, the Town of Huntington Parks and Recreation Department is moving temporarily to the Dix Hills Golf Course Clubhouse starting January 11, 2011. The renovations are expected to take approximately two months. Residents can register for programs and purchase Recreation ID Cards, Golf Cards, and Sports Cards at the Clubhouse, which is located on Vanderbilt Parkway in Dix Hills, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Residents can also register for programs and purchase cards at the Dix Hills Ice Rink, which is also located in the same complex, on Monday and Wednesday evenings until 10 p.m. and on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Residents can also register using the Town's new registration system WebTrac. WebTrac can be accessed through the Town's website: http://town.huntington.ny.us and starting January 14, 2011, you will be able to connect directly to Parks and Recreation's Website: http://tohparks.com. For more information, call Parks and Recreation at 351-3089.

 


Petrone, Cuthbertson, Mayoka Help Celebrate Major Milestone in Canon Headquarters Consrtruction


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/6/2011

 
Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilmen Mark Cuthbertson and Mark Mayoka participated recently in the ceremony marking the installation of the first steel column in the construction of the new Melville headquarters for Canon U.S.A. Rep. Steve Israel joined them and Canon executives Joe Adachi, president and CEO, Canon U.S.A, and Seymour Liebman, executive vice president, chief administrative officer and general counsel, in the ceremony. "We have made tremendous progress since our groundbreaking in May and today signifies another milestone in the construction process," Adachi said. "We have been steadfast in our desire to remain on Long Island and we could not have reached this point without the support of state and local officials. I am looking forward to creating a great working environment for our employees and becoming an active member of the Huntington Township community."


 


Huntington Launches LIPA Tax Hike Fight


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 1/5/2011

 
Northport, NY – Huntington Town Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilman Mark Cuthbertson today launched a major grassroots effort to fight the Long Island Power Authority's challenge of the assessment on the Northport Power Plant, a challenge that if successful could cause major pain for Huntington taxpayers while providing minimal if any benefit to LIPA customers. At a rally held in the shadow of the plant's stacks, Supervisor Petrone and Councilman Cuthbertson announced details of "Stop The LIPA Tax Hike," a multi-pronged campaign to fight the LIPA tax lawsuit, including a new website, www.stoplipataxhike.com, to raise awareness and educate residents about the devastating effects a successful LIPA property tax challenge would have. The campaign will also include the distribution of "Stop The LIPA Tax Hike" lawn signs and a Feb. 1 bus trip to Albany to lobby the Governor and New York State lawmakers to help protect Huntington taxpayers. Residents wishing to participate in the lobbying trip can sign up on the website or in person at Town Hall. "LIPA was created as a public utility to serve the best interests of Long Island residents and to replace a private company that placed its stockholders' interests ahead of its customers'," Supervisor Petrone said. "But in filing suit against the Town, LIPA is demonstrating that it cares more about shareholders of British-based National Grid than it does about Long Islanders. With the grassroots effort, we hope to remind LIPA whom they were created to serve." "While we will vigorously defend the town's interests in the suit, the most effective resolution is for LIPA to accede to the wishes of Long Island residents and withdraw the litigation," Councilman Cuthbertson said. "We hope to spread that message, loud and clear, on lawns throughout the Town and in the halls of the State Capitol. By working together, we can stop this attempt to raid Huntington residents' pockets to benefit utility shareholders." In October, LIPA filed its suit challenging the assessment on the Northport Power Plant, an effort that if successful would result in tens of millions of dollars in property tax hikes for Huntington Town residents generally, with the heaviest impact on property owners in the Northport-East Northport School District. In November, the Town Board voted to authorize the Town Attorney to defend the suit using all means at his disposal, including the hiring of outside counsel, consultants and experts. The Town Attorney is currently interviewing law firms that specialize in utility and tax litigation. The Town Board resolution also created an Assessment Advisory Committee, composed of representatives from Town government, taxing jurisdictions in the Northport area and area business groups, including the Village of Northport, the Northport/East Northport Union Free School District, the Northport/East Northport Library District and the Northport and East Northport Chambers of Commerce. The Committee held its first meeting recently and will continue to meet regularly. The suit contends that the Northport plant is worth less than eleven percent of the value reflected by its current assessment, on which LIPA plays a total of roughly $70-million in property taxes. In addition to serious increases in Countywide and Police District portions of tax bills, Town of Huntington residents broadly would experience tax increases of up to 10 percent. The Northport-East Northport school and library districts are looking at a whopping 50 percent tax increase. Under an agreement between LIPA and National Grid, tax savings from an assessment reduction would be passed on to National Grid and its shareholders. "The LIPA property tax challenge comes along at the worst possible time for every Huntington taxpayer. An assessment change would add yet another financial burden to Huntington residents and could very well be the difference between a family staying in the community or picking up stakes. On behalf of every overburdened and underserved LIPA customer, I call on LIPA to do the right thing, drop the challenge and put the hardworking customers' needs ahead of corporate greed," said Senator Carl L. Marcellino (R-Syosset). Assemblyman James Conte (R-Huntington Station) said, "When LIPA was created there was an agreement that it would not proceed with any tax certiorari proceedings. Our taxpayers should not be hit with a 10 percent tax increase in these tough economic times. As a state representative from Huntington, I will work with our local town officials, LIPA representatives and Governor Cuomo to ensure that Huntington residents are treated fairly and not taxed out of their homes." Assemblyman Andrew Raia (R-Huntington) said, "I am proud to support my fellow taxpayers and the families of the Northport / East Northport School District in strong opposition to LIPA's lawsuit. I pledge to stand along side my colleagues in local government as we work to find an equitable solution to LIPA's actions against our community. "


 


Town Hall Closed on Dec. 31


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/29/2010

 
Town Hall will be closed on Friday, December 31, 2010 for the New Year's holiday.

 


Petrone Lifts Snow Emergency


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/27/2010

 
Supervisor Frank P. Petrone today lifted the order declaring a snow emergency in the Town. Supervisor Petrone's directive lifting the order is effective at 2 p.m. "While we ask motorists to continue to use caution, the restrictions imposed by a snow emergency are no longer necessary," Supervisor Petrone said. Supervisor Petrone issued the original order effective 1:30 p.m. yesterday. Under a snow emergency, the Supervisor has the power to close roads, appropriate necessary equipment from all sources and make necessary purchases without following the usual procedures. The declaration also makes available to the highway department Town equipment and personnel to assist highway department crews.

 


Town Hall Delayed Opening of 10:30 AM for Monday


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/27/2010
Author: A. J. Carter

 
Because of the storm, Town Hall will have a delayed opening on Monday, December 27, 2010. Town Hall will open at 10:30 a.m

 


Petrone Declares Snow Emergency


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/26/2010
Author: A. J. Carter

 
Petrone Declares Snow Emergency Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone today declared an official snow emergency, effective at 1:30 p.m., allowing the Town to take whatever action is necessary to protect the safety of Town residents during and after the current storm. "This declaration allows me to marshal resources, both public and private, to help deal with the storm's expected effects," Supervisor Petrone said. "Among other things, it helps us put all Town employees on notice that they might be needed at any time to assist in this effort, which should help in the scheduling of crews to ensure that all workers have adequate rest." Under a snow emergency, the Supervisor has the power to close roads, appropriate necessary equipment from all sources and make necessary purchases without following the usual procedures. The declaration also makes available to the Highway Department Town equipment and personnel to assist Highway Department crews. The Supervisor also opened the Town's Emergency Operations Center to coordinate the Town's response to the storm. Representatives from several Town departments with key emergency responsibilities were told to report to the Center, in the Town's general services facility on Pulaski Road in Huntington Station. "Residents should feel confident that the Town will do whatever it takes to ensure, as best as possible, that roads are passable and necessary services are being provided," Supervisor Petrone said. "I hope, however, that people will stay off the roads, stay indoors and enjoy the remainder of the holiday weekend with their families." The Supervisor reminds residents that anyone needing to contact the Town should call 351-3234 for emergencies.

 


Dix Hills Ice Rink Closed Monday Morning


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/26/2010
Author: A. J. Carter

 
Because of the inclement weather, the Dix Hills Ice Rink will be closed tomorrow morning, Monday, December 27th, 2010. It is scheduled to reopen for the public skate at 1:30 PM.

 


Town Hall Closed Dec. 23 and 24


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/22/2010

 
Town Hall will be closed on Thursday, Dec. 23, and Friday, Dec. 24, for the Christmas Holiday.

 


Petrone, Israel Present WWII Army Nurse with Overdue Service Medals


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/20/2010

 
Huntington, NY— Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Rep. Steve Israel (D – Huntington) today presented Huntington Resident Mary Occhiogrosso with her overdue WWII medals honoring her service as an Army Corps Nurse. Mary served at Iwo Jima where she helped open a hospital. "During WWII, Mary went above and beyond the call of duty. She was one of ten nurses who helped open a hospital at Iwo Jima and she sang in a band when the USO wasn't able to provide entertainment. Mary has waited 67 years too long to be honored for her service. I'm humbled to be able to present her with her service medals today," said Rep. Israel. "Looking back, its is clear that Mary's efforts during World War II established the framework for a distinguished, lifelong career helping others," Supervisor Petrone said. "I am thrilled that my office and Congressman Israel were able to unite Mary with the medals she earned so many years ago and which she so richly deserves." She will receive the following medals: Meritorious Unit Commendation, American Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with one Bronze Service Star, World War II Victory Medal, and the Honorable Service Lapel Button. Mary graduated from nursing school in 1943 and joined the U.S. Army Nurse Corps. Mary completed basic training in Hawaii and then was shipped off to Cypan. Due to her outstanding work as a nurse Mary was chosen to be one of the ten nurses who would be sent off to Iwo Jima to open a hospital on the base there. After the war was over Mary was discharged at the age of 24 years old. From there she took a job with the Red Cross as a Disaster Nurse, later worked at Bellevue in the operating room, then went to the French Poly Clinic as an Operating Room Supervisor, and she spent 10 years at Huntington Hospital as the Supervisor for Orthopedics. She later went back to work at Birchwood Nursing Home and worked there for another 10 years.


 


Ice Rink Addition Opens with Gala Program


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/17/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Dix Hills, New York – With stirring words from a legendary New York Islander, a dazzling exhibition by an Olympic figure skater and a ceremonial puck drop, the Town of Huntington opened the $16 million addition to the Dix Hills Ice Rink Sept. 16, more than doubling the size of the town facility and allowing for additional programming for Town residents. "When renovations are completed at our existing rink, this facility will be the premier ice skating venue on Long Island," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone told the more than 400 people who filled the bleachers for the opening program. Supervisor Petrone thanked the many residents and Town employees who assisted in the planning and construction of the addition Participating in the festivities were Town Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan Berland, Glenda Jackson and Mark Mayoka; Town Clerk Jo-Ann Raia; and Tax Receiver Ester Bivona, who detailed for the audience the history of the U.S. flag hanging at the rink: It was brought back from Iraq and presented to the Town by her son, Lt. Col. John C. Bivona Jr. Islanders legend Bob Nystrom spoke to the audience about the importance of facilities such as the new rink in promoting youth hockey. Olympic figure skater Emily Hughes thrilled the audience with a brief program. Also participating was the West Hollow Middle School Sweet 16 choir and a color guard from the Elwood/Commack VFW Post #9263 The original rink opened in 1974 as an outdoor facility. It was the first publicly operated ice rink in Suffolk County. In 1986, the rink became an all-season facility with the construction of an enclosure. Over the years, skating, and – especially – youth hockey grew in popularity, creating the demand for a second sheet of ice. The Town worked with community representatives to refine plans for the expansion. The new facility adds a total of 43,232 square feet to the ice rink, more than doubling its original size. In addition to the new sheet of ice, the expansion includes four locker rooms with restrooms and showers;an upgraded concession stand; two party rooms; a new lobby with seating; a new pro shop and a new skate rental booth; a weight training room; and elevated bleachers for 447 spectators. Renovations on the existing facility will include new locker rooms and new piping to enhance the skating surface. This new facility will allow the Town to offer additional programming for children and adults, to expand the Town's summer camp programs and to host youth hockey tournaments.


 


New Technology Cuts Energy Use at Sewer Plant


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/14/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Town of Huntington's Wastewater Treatment Plant, in a pilot project, has become the first location in the country to install a new technology compressor in one of the plant's blowers, a move that is projected to save almost $80,000 a year. If successful – and early results are promising -- the Delta Hybrid Rotary Lobe Compressor manufactured in Germany by Aerzener Maschinenfabrik GmbH and distributed by Pennsylvania-based Aerzen USA, will help keep the plant, which underwent an $18 million upgrade two years ago, at the forefront of technology that promotes efficient operation and environmental preservation. The 2008 upgrade reduced the plant's nitrogen discharge by 90 percent, allowing the Town to meet state-mandated 2014 water quality standards years ahead of schedule and earning the Town a Platinum Award from the American Council of Engineering Companies. That project included upgrading the nitrogen removal system at the plant and installation of an ultraviolet disinfection system, which allowed the existing disinfection chemical storage and handling facilities to be taken out of service and eliminated the need to construct storage and handling facilities for a chemical that would remove chlorine. Even after the upgrade, Town officials continued to explore ways to make the plant operate more efficiently. In particular, the plant uses Sequential Batch Reactor Process Technology, which incorporates large volumes of air to promote the biological treatment of wastewater. Three 125 horsepower blowers generate the air, but use a lot of electricity to do so. The existing blowers also suffered from mechanical failures with many attempts from the manufacturer trying to remedy the situation Almost exactly a year ago, plant officials came across Aerzen's new technology, which the company had tested and had been using in Europe for about three years but had not yet introduced in the United States. Aerzen's combination of blower and screw compressor technologies appeared to force air into the wastewater air more efficiently than the existing technology. Plant officials began speaking with company representatives about allowing the Huntington plant to be used for a field test in which a blower would be installed at the company's expense and tested next to existing ones. In October, Aerzen introduced the Delta Hybrid (a reference to its combination of technologies) at the Water Environment Federation's Technical Exhibition Conference in New Orleans and last month, the blower began operating at the Huntington plant. After a month of operation, the results are encouraging: a 30 percent drop in energy usage, which, if extrapolated to all three blowers and an entire year, would represent a savings of 180,000 kwh of electricity, or about $56,000. Total savings are estimated at $79,000. The Delta Hybrid also operates more quietly than the existing blowers. In addition, the Delta Hybrid has an Internet-based monitoring system that allows Aerzen to monitor the system and spot trends that can result in adjustments that increase efficiency. Huntington officials are encouraged enough by these results to seek funding to install Delta Hybrid blowers on all three units at the wastewater treatment plant. At its meeting this evening, the Town Board is scheduled to authorize applying for a $180,000 New York Environmental Facilities Corp. Green Innovation Grant Program toward the purchase and installation of Delta Hybrid compressors on all the plant's blowers. "The Town takes great pride in a wastewater treatment plant that preserves the environment and operates efficiently," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "We are encouraged that this new technology will help us achieve both goals by reducing our energy costs and noise pollution. The Town appreciates Aerzen's decision allowing Huntington to become the test site for their new technology." "The test of the Aerzen Delta Hybrid has proven solid energy savings and more reliable operations for the treatment plant." said Aerzen USA Technical Manager Ralf Weiser. "We know that this is just the beginning for the town to realize significant savings with the new rotary lobe compressor technology. The maintenance of the machines will prove to be substantially lower than what the operators are used to. Monthly and seasonal oil changes will soon be reduced to one oil change per two years of operation. Overall we are excited to be working with a town that is open to exploring new technologies, reducing energy costs and pursuing an environmentally correct approach."


 


Patricia DelCol Named Deputy Supervisor


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/14/2010

 
Huntington, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone announced today that he has selected Patricia DelCol to become Deputy Supervisor, effective upon the retirement of current Deputy Supervisor Laure Nolan later this month. DelCol is currently the director of the Town's Department of Engineering Services, a post she has held for the past five years. "Pat has had a distinguished career in the public and private sectors and has a deep understanding of the Town, Town government and Town issues. I look forward to working even more closely with Pat as we manage Town operations and address our residents' needs," Supervisor Petrone said in announcing the appointment. "At the same time, I thank Laure Nolan for her many years of dedicated public service and wish her only the best in her retirement." "I am excited by this challenge and I thank Supervisor Petrone for the confidence he has shown in my ability to serve Town residents," DelCol said. DelCol is a lifelong Huntington resident who graduated from Walt Whitman High School and attended Stony Brook University and the C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University. She holds a bachelor's degree in biology and environmental science and a master's degree in cell biology. She started her career as a senior environmental planner in the Town of Babylon's Department of Environmental Control, working on that Town's Bay Management Program and heading up the permitting and environmental impact statement process for that Town in the construction of a resource recovery facility. She joined Huntington government in 1986 as Director of Environmental Control, which at the time was the largest Town department. DelCol oversaw all waste-related divisions -- landfill, incinerators, recycling, refuse collection—as well as the Harbormaster's office, animal control, sewer districts, environmental programs, bay management programs, beaches and marinas. She left Town government in 1988 and returned two years later as the department's deputy director. She became director again in 1994. In 1998, DelCol left town government and went to work for Covanta Energy as business manager of Covanta Babylon. She returned to Huntington government, to her present post, in 2005. DelCol lives in Melville with her husband and daughter.


 


Assessment Advisory Committee Meets


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/13/2010
Author: A. J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Huntington Assessment Advisory Committee held its first meeting today and began mapping out strategy for responding to the Long Island Power Authority's challenge to the assessment on the Northport power plant. Among the options the Committee discussed were a unified effort to convince LIPA to drop the suit; barring that, the Committee discussed how to vigorously defend the plant's assessment by retaining experts. "We don't sit here without any cards," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, who chaired the meeting, told the group, citing, among other facts, letters and public statements from LIPA officials in 2006 that the Authority would not challenge the plant's assessment. "LIPA and National Grid [which owns the plant] are banking on the fact that we are coming from different viewpoints. We need to work together to fight this suit." Joining Supervisor Petrone at the meeting were Councilman Mark Cuthbertson and representatives from from Town government, taxing jurisdictions in the Northport area and area business groups, including the Village of Northport, the Village of Asharoken, the Northport/East Northport Union Free School District, the Northport/East Northport Library District and the Northport and East Northport Chambers of Commerce. In creating the committee by a resolution at its November meeting, the Town Board also authorized the Town Attorney to take all necessary actions to protect the interests of Town taxpayers, including recommending consultants, experts and legal counsel the Town Attorney deems necessary to defend the Town. In May, the Long Island Power Authority filed a complaint challenging the plant's assessment and followed that complaint with a tax certiorari petition filed in State Supreme Court Oct. 15, contending the plant was worth only 10.7 percent of the value reflected by its assessment. Among the possible effects should LIPA be successful in the suit are significant increases in Town, Village and School District property taxes. Supervisor Petrone said he would form an action team from among the committee members to meet weekly and continue the strategic discussions.


 


Major Renovation Begins at Betty Allen Park Preserve


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/9/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Centerport, NY – The Town of Huntington is beginning a major improvement project at Betty Allen Park Preserve, a popular hiking and nature observation site with a pond that is also used for freshwater fishing. The $330,000 project will include rehabilitating the spillway at the park and constructing a new fish ladder and fishing platform. The Town designed and constructed the Betty Allen Park Preserve pond and trail system to encourage public access to Betty Allen Pond, associated freshwater wetlands and the adjacent lowland forest, a complex that represents an environmentally sound ecosystem. It has been heavily used by hikers and freshwater fishermen. Betty Allen Pond drains northward to the head of Northport Harbor via Stony Hollow Run, which passes through a dam structure and under Route 25A. The existing dam, which regulates the rate of discharge from the pond, has deteriorated over time. Construction of the new spillway and dam will preserve the integrity of the pond. The fish ladder (located within the structure of the spillway) will help increase the fish population by creating new spawning areas. Funding for the long-planned project includes a $100,000 grant from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, $65,000 in grants from the federal National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and $150,000 from the Town's Environmental Open Space and park Improvement (EOSPA) Fund. The work is being performed by Amma Construction Corp. of Huntington Station. As a result of the project, Betty Allen Park Preserve will be closed to the public for an estimated three to six months, beginning Dec. 15. Residents are encouraged to use the trails at Phragmites Park just across Route 25A from Betty Allen.


 


Huntington Announces Holiday Athletic Workshops


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/6/2010

 
Town of Huntington Parks and Recreation Department will offer a series of athletic workshops during the winter recess at Coindre Hall on December 28, 29, and 30. Children will receive specialized training by qualified coaches and instructors. Basketball will be offered from 9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m. for children in grades 1 - 3 and from 11:15 a.m. – 1:15 p.m. for children in grades 4 – 6. Soccer will be offered from 1:30 p.m. – 3 p.m. for children in grades 1 – 3. The cost is $40 with a Recreation ID card and $55 without the card. Registration is currently underway at the Parks and Recreation Department, Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. or online at www.active.com/browse/huntingtonrecreation. For more information call the Parks and Recreation Department at 351-3089.

 


Menorah Lighting Ceremony Marks Start of Hanukkah


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/2/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, members of the Town Council and Tax Receiver Ester Bivona joined Rabbi Asher Vaisfiche of the Chabad of Huntington in a Dec. 1 Town Hall menorah-lighting ceremony that marked the start of the Jewish festival of Hanukkah. The event, originally scheduled for the Village Green but moved indoors because of inclement weather, included festive music and the traditional eating of jelly doughnuts. Both Rabbi Vaisfiche and Supervisor Petrone spoke about the meaning of the holiday – known as the festival of lights -- and the relevance of its message to all Town residents.


 


Menorah Lighting Moved to Town Hall


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 12/1/2010

 
Because of the inclement weather and the prediction of high winds, the Menorah Lighting scheduled for 6 p.m. tonight at the Village Green will instead be held in the lobby of Town Hall. Everybody is welcome.

 


Tree Lighting Kicks Off Holiday Season


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/29/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Town Supervisor Frank Petrone, members of the Town Council and other elected officials helped usher in the holiday season November 27 by participating in the Holiday Parade and Tree Lighting in Huntington village. Standing on the stage at the end of the parade and addressing a crowd that numbered into the thousands, Supervisor Petrone led the countdown that ended with trees being lit simultaneously at the street festival, on the lawn at Town Hall and on the Village Green. Joining Supervisor Petrone were Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan Berland, Glenda Jackson and Mark Mayoka; Town Clerk Jo-Ann Raia; Tax Receiver Ester Bivona; and Assemblymen James Conte and Andrew Raia. The parade and festival were sponsored by the Town, the Huntington Village and Huntington Station Business Improvement Districts, the Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce, the Huntington and Huntington Manor Fire Departments and the Huntington Chiefs' Council. The menorah at the Village Green will be lit in a ceremony scheduled for 6 p.m. Wednesday, December 1, led by Rabbi Asher Vaisfiche of Chabad of Huntington


 


Town Welcomes Dental Office to Huntington Station


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/29/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and members of the Town Council today celebrated the opening of Huntington Dental Care's office in a Town-owned building at 1266 New York Avenue, part of the Town's effort to provide underserved area residents an option for dental services and to aid in Huntington Station's revitalization. As part of the Town's agreement with Huntington Dental Care, the office will dedicate two afternoons a week to provide residents with free examinations, consultations and oral health care screenings. In particular, Dr. Vikas Arora hopes to encourage parents to bring their children, to start them on their way toward a lifetime of dental health. Just as important from the Town's perspective is the message the office – situated between the Huntington Station Enrichment Center and the Town's soon-to-be opened Huntington Station Business Incubator -- sends that the private sector is confident enough in the area's future to invest the resources to lease the space and to make the necessary renovations. "We welcome Dr. Arora and Huntington Dental Care to the community and wish them many years of success treating patients at this location," Supervisor Petrone said. "This opening is another example of how Huntington Station's revitalization continues, as symbolized by the Enrichment Center and Business Incubator on either side of this office, the 7-Eleven and produce market across the street and the many other projects that are underway." In describing Huntington Dental Care's operations. Dr, Arora noted, "The core objective is to encourage parents to have their children evaluated in a stress free non-clinic private office setting to give every child the benefit of a healthy start to oral health care." Dr. Arora said that in addition to the free screenings, Huntington Dental Care will institute a generous sliding fee scale and accept Medicaid and various other HMO, state-sponsored health plans to make the office as accessible as possible to general public. "In renting this space to Huntington Dental Care, the Town achieves both medical and community development goals," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. "This increased traffic as a result of this office's presence should go a long way toward helping improve the community's image." "The opening of this dental office will bring services to families who may have not had access to them before. This partnership is also an excellent example of government and the private sector working together to foster economic development and to benefit the community," Councilwoman Susan Berland said. Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said, "We hope the community will take advantage of the services the Town has arranged for Huntington Dental Care to provide. Preventative health and dental care is always key and the way we encourage it is to begin with our youth. This is a great endeavor. We will be working with the Enrichment Center as well as others to make sure that people know what is available," Councilman Mark Mayoka said, "This office makes sense from both a medical perspective and an economic one. This office will also bring income to the Town in the form of rent. I hope Dr. Arora's success will encourage other medical practices to relocate to Huntington Station." Huntington Dental Care will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. The telephone number is 631-923-2037.


 


Huntington Gets Another Top Rating for Its Bonds


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/23/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – A third financial agency has upheld the Town of Huntington's top bond rating, citing the Town's "stable economic base and prudent management." Fitch Ratings, in a decision announced today, maintained its "AAA" rating on a total of $71.9 million in bonds previously issued by the Town for its uses and for the South Huntington Water district. "The 'AAA' rating reflects the town's mature economic base and high residential wealth levels, strong financial operations characterized by ample reserves and strong liquidity, and low debt levels and limited future capital needs," Fitch Ratings said in a release announcing its decision. "Although the major general fund revenue sources of mortgage tax receipts and governmental aid experienced notable declines in recent years, Fitch believes the town's prudent financial management coupled with the a broad and stable tax base limits to a degree the risks associated with these two revenue sources." Fitch joins Standard & Poor's and Moody's in upholding the top rating for Huntington bonds. In July, based upon Moody's upholding Huntington's Aaa rating and Standard & Poor's upholding its "AAA" rating, the Town was able to sell its $15.3 million 2010 public improvement serial bonds at a very favorable interest rate of 2.85 percent. "We appreciate the recognition Wall Street continues to give Huntington for the way we have managed Town finances, cutting spending in response to economic pressures while continuing to maintain desired services," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "These ratings have allowed the Town to keep borrowing costs low, saving taxpayers money now and well into the future."

 


Preparations Continue for Holiday Parade and Festival


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/19/2010

 
Huntington, NY – Preparations for the Nov. 27 Holiday Parade and Festival have moved into full swing, with more than 25 fire departments, community groups and private companies signing on so far to help usher the holiday season into Huntington Village. Sponsored by the Town of Huntington, the Huntington Village and Huntington Station Business Improvement Districts, the Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce, the Huntington and Huntington Manor Fire Departments and the Huntington Chiefs' Council, the parade down New York Avenue and along Main Street will bring Santa Claus to the reviewing stand at Wall Street. There, he will join the Town Board in lighting the Town's Holiday Tree. The parade begins at 6 p.m., and the Street Festival will continue on Wall Street until 9 p.m. Santa will be joined by some popular characters such as Snoopy, The Grinch, Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, Sesame Street's Elmo and Toy Story's Woody in greeting children. Free hot chocolate, hot cider and cookies will be served. The festival will include performances from many local groups and promotions from local merchants. People attending the festival are encouraged to bring an unwrapped toy and participate in the Town's efforts to support the Toys for Tots program. In case of inclement weather, the rain date for the parade is Nov. 28.

 


Parade, Street Festival to Kick Off Holiday Season


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/12/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Town of Huntington, joined by local business groups and Fire Departments, will help kick off the holiday season on November 27 with a parade through Huntington Village, culminating in the Town's annual tree lighting ceremony at a street festival on Wall Street. Numerous fire departments, marching bands, churches, scouts and civic groups are scheduled to participate in the parade, which will begin at 6 p.m. Nov. 27 near the Big H Shopping Center and proceed north on New York Avenue to Main Street, where it will take a brief westerly course before ending at Wall Street. Wall Street will be closed to traffic from Main Street to Gerard Street until 9 p.m. for the festival, which will include performances from many local groups and promotions from local merchants. After some brief remarks, Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone will light a tree at the festival, simultaneously lighting holiday trees on the Village Green and at Town Hall. Parents are invited to bring their children to meet Santa Claus and some of their favorite characters, including Snoopy, The Grinch, Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, Sesame Street's Elmo and Toy Story's Woody. The Halesite fire Department will have Buddy the Elf on board the actual sled used in filming the movie, "Elf." Free hot chocolate and cookies will be served. "Thanksgiving marks the start of the holiday season, and this parade will help kick off the season with a bang," Supervisor Petrone said. "We hope this will become an annual tradition that will put people in the right spirit for the whole season.' The parade and festival's sponsors include the Town, the Huntington Village and Huntington Station Business Improvement Districts, the Huntington Township Chamber of Commerce, the Huntington and Huntington Manor Fire Departments and the Huntington Chiefs' Council. People attending the festival are encouraged to bring an unwrapped toy and participate in the Town's efforts to support the Toys for Tots program. In case of inclement weather, the rain date for the parade is Nov. 28.

 


Huntington Authorizes Fight on Assessment Challenge


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/5/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Huntington Town Board voted last night to create an Assessment Advisory Committee -- composed of representatives from Town government, taxing jurisdictions in the Northport area and area business groups – as the Town prepares to defend vigorously a challenge to the assessment on the Northport power plant. The Town Board's resolution also authorized the Town Attorney to take all necessary actions to protect the interests of Town taxpayers, including recommending consultants, experts and legal counsel the Town Attorney deems necessary to defend the Town. In May, the Long Island Power Authority filed a complaint challenging the plant's assessment and followed that complaint with a tax certiorari petition filed in State Supreme Court Oct. 15, contending the plant was worth only 10.7 percent of the value reflected by its assessment. "This is a serious matter, with potentially devastating effects on the taxes of property owners in the Town at many different levels," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "We intend to use all necessary tools to defend the Town's actions, and look forward to working with our partners in the other potentially affected taxing jurisdictions to develop our strategy for winning this suit." The advisory committee will include representatives from the Town of Huntington, the Village of Northport, the Northport/East Northport Union Free School District, the Northport/East Northport Library district and the Northport, East Northport and Huntington Chambers of Commerce. Its role will be to collect all pertinent information, meet with the community, identify options and submit by March 31, 2011, a written report containing its findings and recommendations for the Town Board's consideration. In other action, the Board: -- approved the 2011 Operating and Capital Budgets. The $184.3 million Operating Budget reduces spending by $800,000 from the 2010 budget. The $10.9 million Capital Budget represents a 22 percent decrease from 2010. The capital budget does, however, double spending for road rehabilitation, from $1.5 million to $3 million. -- set fees for various Town services and programs. -- approved funding ($188,833) and a contract with Pioneer Construction Company to rehabilitate the Colonial Arsenal to upgrade the 18th-century building to current code requirements and greatly enhance its accessibility. Of the funding, $47,533 will come from a state Environmental Protection Fund Historic Preservation grant and $92,000 from the Town's Environmental Open Space and Park Improvement Fund. -- authorized extending for three years the contract with Kemper Sports Management Inc. to manage the Town's Crab Meadow and Dix Hills Golf Courses. The Board also authorized contracts with professional instructors to provide ice skating lessons at the Dix Hills Ice Rink. -- approved suspending parking meter fees in the Huntington Village shopping area from Nov, 26, 2010 to Jan. 1, 2011 and allowing holiday lights and decorations to be installed in Huntington Village, Huntington Station and East Northport. -- approved lowering the speed limit on Woodhull Road in the vicinity of Woodhull Intermediate School to 20 miles per hour. -- approved the schedule of Town Board meetings for 2011.

 


Huntington Welcomes Field of Honor to Town Hall


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 11/1/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and members of the Town Council today welcomed the "Field of Honor" to the lawn in front of Town Hall – 1,000 flags that will fly for the month of November to honor past and present members of our country's armed forces. A project of Kiwanis International nationwide and the Kiwanis Club of Huntington, flags are purchased (at $35 a flag) to recognize a specific individual who has served our country in the military. A map will help persons locate the flag they have purchased that bears their honoree's name. Proceeds from the project will be used to send children of deployed service members to Kiwanis Camp, a weeklong summer camp upstate. The flags will also be part of the Town's annual Veterans Day Wreath Ceremony, which begins at 9:30 a.m. at Veterans Plaza in front of Town Hall on Nov. 7. The ceremony is sponsored by the Town and the Town's Veterans Advisory Board. The public is invited. At the ceremony, the Kiwanis will be sponsoring a canteen in memory of Len Tortora, a longtime member of the Veterans Advisory Board who died earlier this year. High school Kiwanis members will be providing hot chocolate, coffee and doughnuts from the canteen.


 


Five Honored at Women’s Networking Day


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/27/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
East Northport, NY -- Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and the Town Council today honored five outstanding women for their contributions to the community as the Town held its 9th Annual Women's Networking Day. More than 400 people attended the event, run under the auspices of the Town's Division of Women's Services, which this year carried the theme "Empowering Today's Woman," focusing on strategies to enable women to become successful in their personal endeavors. The event, held at the Larkfield Manor, featured more than 50 informational booths, where experts provided answers and advice on a variety of topics of concern to women. The event was highlighted by presentations to the honorees, each chosen by a member of the Town Board for her achievements in making Huntington a better place to live. "Each of these women deserve to be commended individually for the ways in which they have contributed to Huntington's outstanding quality of life," Supervisor Petrone said. "Taken together, they impressively demonstrate the significant contributions women have made and continue to make in our community." The honorees are: Debbie Rimler, executive director of the Tri Community Youth Agency (Tri-CYA) since its creation in 1990. Tri-CYA provides educational, recreational, cultural and advocacy services to youth and their families. From writing, securing and implementing grants, and from collaborations with schools, other not for profits and government, the Tri-CYA continues to grow under her leadership. She has also served on many task forces and committees, including the Huntington Station Action Coalition, the Anti-Gang Task Force and the committee that recognized and helped in the community organization for the Dolan Family Health Center. She was recognized by Supervisor Petrone. Ann Stevens, who has longtime involvement in many civic, not-for-profit and business groups. She is co-founder and member of the board of directors of the Peterson-Krag Center, a former Northport Village trustee, a founding member of the Northport Business Development Committee, past president of the Northport Rotary Club and a leader in many Rotary Club activities. She is also a concert pianist and musical director who has been Music Director/Pianist in the Northport Schools and Northport Community Theatre; a performing member of the Huntington Arts Council and someone who has volunteered her musical talents at fundraisers supporting charitable organizations. She was recognized by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson. CorriAnn Young, who has been an active member of the Half Hollow Hills community for the past 14 years and who recently finished her term as President of the Half Hollow Hills district-wide PTA Council, where she led efforts to raise over $40,000 in scholarship money for new college students. She has served on numerous school district committees and was instrumental in organizing and coordinating the Half Hollow Hills Relay For Life events on behalf of the PTA. She has also volunteered for over 15 years as a religious education teacher for both St. Matthew's R.C. Church in Dix Hills and St. Hugh of Lincoln in Huntington Station. She currently works as an assistant teacher in the REACH-CYA pre-kindergarten program at Signal Hill Elementary School. She was recognized by Councilwoman Susan Berland. Ginette Rows, Assistant Director of Nursing for the Apex Rehabilitation and Nursing Care Center. She serves on the Haitian Volunteer Board of Directors for Valme Ministries, is President of Woman's Day Committee, Treasurer for the Reformation Lutheran Church, Coordinator of the Haitian Senior Citizen-Bon Jour Club and Publisher of the SANTè newsletter for the Suffolk County Haitian Community. In response to the earthquake that devastated Haiti earlier this year, she worked with her fellow volunteer board members to reconstruct the building blocks for an elementary school in an impoverished region of Léogâne, Haiti. She was recognized by Counilwoman Glenda Jackson. Lisa Perez Flanagan, Coordinator and Director of the Northport School District's "Students for 60,000," leading the District's largest student organization and focusing its efforts on humanitarianism both locally and internationally. She leads her students volunteering to raise funds and in working with the Huntington Interfaith Homeless Initiative, La Casa Communal, in cultivating the bio-intensive garden at the Lewis Oliver Farm providing fresh produce for the Northport Food Pantry. She has broadened the Students for 60,000's outreach by traveling with them to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, where they demolished the Lindy Boggs Medical Center, preparing for its transformation into a nursing home. She has led semi-annual trips to Nicaragua delivering school supplies, clothing, first aid and educational materials to underprivileged individuals. She was recognized by Councilman Mark Mayoka. The Women's Division presents this annual event to help the public receive important information and learn about services offered by the Town's numerous non-profit organizations. .


 


Huntington Takes Title to 1000 New York Avenue


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/27/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY – The Town of Huntington has taken title to the abandoned automobile repair shop at 1000 New York Avenue and has begun the measures necessary before demolishing the structure, the latest step toward redeveloping the site with a mixed-use building that is a key element of the Town's Huntington Station redevelopment plans. The closing occurred Oct. 15, after the owner, Dish Realty, agreed not to contest the Town's decision to acquire the property through eminent domain. "The Town is moving to eliminate this long-standing community eyesore as quickly as possible and replace it with a structure that will be a source of community pride," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "Huntington Station's revitalization continues, step by step, and this is an important facet of our revitalization plan." Last week, an outside appraiser retained by the Town visited the site to conduct an appraisal of fixtures in the building. The Town this week began assessing what remediation measures are necessary and will apply for a demolition permit. The Town projects that demolition will occur toward the end of next month. The Town will be seeking a developer for the property; it expects to issue a request for proposals for a developer early next year. "The community has told us they want this building down, and we are in the process of doing that. We want something they can be proud of in its place, and we are working hard to make that a reality as soon as possible," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. The Town has been trying for some time to encourage the redevelopment of the property and secured a $1.17 million Restore NY Communities grant to assist in the demolition and construction of the 10,800-square foot mixed-use, retail and residential building. When a formal agreement with the owner of the property could not be reached, the Town started the process to acquire the property and take over its replacement. The property is central to the Town's redevelopment plans, which includes transformation of a 17,000-square foot right of way in front of the parcel at New York Avenue and Olive Street into a pedestrian-friendly, aesthetically pleasing public plaza. The Town is working the State Department of Transportation to obtain the permits necessary to construct the plaza. The Restore NY grant is the second the Town has received. The Town also received a $1.56 million grant to acquire three lots on nearby Columbia Street and build 16 affordable housing units as part of the "Take Back the Blocks" program that is another element of the Town's Huntington Station redevelopment plans. Dilapidated houses on the three acquired lots were demolished earlier this month. "These two projects exemplify the Town's commitment to Huntington Station's continued revitalization, providing economic development and much-needed affordable housing," Councilwoman Susan Berland said. "We are making progress on many different fronts and look forward to working with the community as this process continues." "Demolition of 1000 New York Avenue will remove a symbol of Huntington Station blight, and the concept of mixed use is also a definite benefit to this location," Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said. "We look forward to admiring the replacement building from the public plaza the Town is building in front as part of our revitalization projects." Both projects are part of the broader Huntington Station redevelopment initiative that the Town's Economic Development Corp, has been working on for several years. The revitalization has also included redevelopment of the Big H Shopping Center, construction of the Highview at Huntington affordable housing project and plans to reclaim brownfields sites.

 


Petrone Receives 2010 Trailblazer Award


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/25/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

Supervisor Frank Petrone receives 2010 Trailblazer Award from GLICCC Program Coordinator Rita Ebert, left, and President Dominick Longobardi, right
 
Farmingdale, NY – Huntington Town Supervisor Frank P. Petrone was honored recently with the Greater Long Island Clean Cities Coalition's 2010 Trailblazer Award in recognition of the Town's leadership role in promoting the use of alternative fuel vehicles. Supervisor Petrone received the award at the organization's annual conference, held at Carlyle on the Green in Bethpage State Park on October 22. The GLICCC represents more than 300 private and public sector stakeholders in the Long Island region and works to educate Long Island businesses, municipalities, educational institutions and other organizations about the benefits of using alternative fuel vehicles. It describes its mission as "to facilitate energy independence, improve air quality and encourage economic growth." In presenting the award to Supervisor Petrone, GLICCC President Dominick Longobardi noted how under Supervisor Petrone's direction, Huntington has been a leader in promoting the use of alternative fuel vehicles. Of particular note was the Town's decision to require that starting January 1, 2010, all private garbage carters utilize vehicles powered by compressed natural gas and to begin the process of converting the Town's refuse truck fleet to CNG. Huntington also entered into an agreement with the Town of Smithtown and Clean Energy Corp. that allowed construction of a CNG filling station in front of the Smithtown Town landfill. By joining with Smithtown, Huntington helped provide the market that made the filling station financially viable for Clean Energy. The Town also is committed to encouraging hybrid and all-electric vehicles. The Town operates 16 hybrid vehicles and last year participated in a field test of all-electric Mini Cooper vehicles. And, using federal stimulus funds, the Town is constructing a charging station for five electric vehicles at the Huntington LIRR station. That charging station will be solar powered.


 


Huntington Acquires Parcels to Expand Two Parks


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/21/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Town of Huntington recently acquired parcels that will expand Town parks in Huntington Station and Dix Hills, allowing in one location the addition of facilities at a well-used neighborhood park and helping protect environmentally sensitive land for wildlife and trails use at the other. "These are two very different parks, serving persons with different interests, but taken together they demonstrate Huntington's commitment to improving recreational opportunities for all Town residents while at the same time protecting the environment and encouraging development where it is appropriate," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. In Huntington Station, the purchase of the 0.75-acre Mustazza property nearly doubles the size of Alfred Walker Park on West 11th Street. One-third of the purchase will be held as a natural buffer along the north and east edges of the property. The remaining half-acre will be available for recreational use, which will be determined after obtaining input from the community. The property, which cost $260,000, was purchased through the Town's Environmental Open Space and Park Improvement Fund. The Town's EOSPA Committee has also recommended that new fencing be installed to encompass the perimeter of the newly expanded park. "This is a true neighborhood park, frequented by neighborhood children who use it in its entirety. We look forward to meeting with the community to see what the Town can do with this additional space to make Alfred Walker Park an even more vital part of the Town," Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said. "These acquisitions continue our Town's participation in creating open space to support the need for recreation, outdoor play and exercise for healthier beings and enhanced quality of life." While a small acquisition, the acquisition process was complex and time consuming and entailed subdividing the property and transferring density flow rights to meet Suffolk County Health Department standards to retain the existing historic house. The town appreciates the patience and goodwill of the seller, Ms. Christine Mustazza, throughout the process. The park is named for the late Alfred Walker (1908-1972), a famed cartoonist whose family moved to 33 W. 11th Street in 1927 and whose father, a horticulturalist, ran a flower business from his greenhouse on the property. After attending college at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, Alfred Walker returned to Huntington, married and began raising a family of three sons at 33 W. 11th Street. As a cartoonist, Mr. Walker created many memorable comic book characters and worked for Walt Disney Studios in the late 1930s, when Disney was producing animated feature films and the acclaimed Silly Symphonies cartoons. He was active in the Huntington community, including Cub Scout, school and church events and amateur theatrical productions, providing banners, posters, plaques and large scenery. After his death in 1972, the park was named for Mr, Walker in recognition of the many nationally syndicated comic book characters he created and his considerable artistic contributions to the community. "Al Walker lovingly captured the wonder of nature through detailed illustrations of sea, sky and landscape. It is so fitting that Uncle Al's own backyard idyll can now become part of the Alfred J. Walker Park, to be enjoyed forever by all," said his nephew, Stephen Walker. "Hopefully young Huntington artists of the future will be inspired by the park's beauty, and sense the joy of living which Alfred Walker expressed through the faces of his vibrant comic book characters." The second acquisition involved the donation of a 2.8-acre site that has become an addition to Otsego Park in Dix Hills. The property, which contains a state-rare pitch pine-scrub oak habitat, has an existing trail that connects the Otsego Park to the New York State Edgewood Oak Brush Plains Preserve. The oak brush plain is a unique pine barrens ecotype. The property has been a preservation goal of the Town's EOSPA Committee and has been supported by the Edgewood Task Force. "The habitat and drinking water protection attributes of this property are matched only by the creative way the land was preserved. Good work, Huntington," said Richard Amper, executive director of the Long Island Pine Barrens Society. The owners, Gus Schad and Steven Dubner, donated the land to the Town and paid all closing costs while retaining the density flow rights, which were severed from the site and can now be brokered to allow increased development at more appropriate sites elsewhere in the Town. Under the Town's Density Flow Rights program, owners of properties where development is limited by wastewater capacity requirements can "buy" capacity from undeveloped properties. The properties where those rights are "sold" then lose their ability to be developed. The Huntington Planning Board approved the property as a sending site on January 7, 2009. Under Town Code, prospective flow purchasers must have their properties approved as receiving sites by the Planning Board and by the Suffolk County Department of Health Services. Sending sites can only be used in accordance with existing zoning. As a result, this transaction resulted in preservation of important open space, at no Town cost, and will enable improvements to other sites in the Town of Huntington. "It's a win-win," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. "The public receives the land and the right to hike its trail in perpetuity and the prior owners gain the benefit of the rights they will sell to support other Huntington projects." "Steven Dubner and Gus Schad are to be commended for their donation of this land, allowing for preservation of the trail," Councilwoman Susan A. Berland said. "We invite Town residents to walk this trail to see, up close, a unique part of Long island." "These two acquisitions are cost-effective additions to the Huntington parks network," Councilman Mark Mayoka said. "In addition to its unique terrestrial ecology, the Oak Brush Plains play an important role in the protection of the sole source aquifer that provides Long Island's drinking water," said Peter A. Scully, regional director of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. "Because the Dubner-Schad parcel lies adjacent to the Oak Brush Plains Special Groundwater Protection Area, preserving this land in its natural state will help to strengthen the protection of our groundwater for future generations." "These are the types of properties that add to the quality of life in Huntington, providing diverse outdoor recreational opportunities that will appeal to residents' diverse interests," said EOPSA Committee Chair Joy Squires. Trails have become a recreation priority in Huntington. Working with Town staff the Huntington Trails Committee released its first Trails Guide in 2009 and is presently working on a follow-up edition. For further information on the Town EOSPA or Transfer of Density Flow Rights Programs and whether your land could be preserved, or your project could be assisted, contact the Department of Planning and Environment at 351-3196.

 


Northport Harbor Water Quality Protection Committee Presents Draft Action Plan


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/20/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Northport Harbor Water Quality Protection Committee, formed in April 2010 as an outgrowth of a water infrastructure summit, today presented its Draft Action Plan for restoring Northport Harbor waters to good health – a series of short-, medium- and long-term initiatives and suggestions about how various levels of government can work together and how to seek funding to implement the recommendations. "The Committee worked very hard to come up with solutions that were workable and directions that we all concur with," Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, a committee co-chair, said in opening the public meeting at which the Draft Action Plan was presented. "We're pleased that we were able to put a group together of municipalities, federal and state agencies and activists. We got to learn about problems that many of us would not have identified if we dealt with this isolated on one level. Coming together gave us the opportunity to coordinate and to understand some of the problems and issues." "This is an unprecedented collaboration between federal, state county, town village, stakeholders, academia and environmentalists," said the other co-chair, Adrienne Esposito, executive director of the Citizens Campaign for the Environment. Esposito noted that the committee "needed to identify what the problems are, identify the solutions and put the plan out for public comment, which is what we're doing today. We worked hard to capture what we think are the main points, but we need public help, public input to complete the process and make it as rigorous and strenuous as it possibly can be." Highlights of the plan's recommendations include: · Developing among all the participating municipalities uniform codes and rules and regulations to correct illegal discharges. · Studying and implementing infrastructure upgrades, including identifying and isolating coliform sources, upgrading Northport sewer lines and outfall pipes where needed , dredging Northport Harbor, Duck Island Harbor and Centerport Harbor. · Controlling stormwater runoff through installation of catch basin and drain inserts on Beach Blum Drive in Centerport and Valley Grove Beach in Eaton's Neck, among other locations. · Restocking shellfish and oyster beds · Developing a GIS topical computer model of storm water runoff to identify pollution sources, creating a hydrodynamic model of Northport Harbor to understand how dredging will impact tidal flow and circulation and undertaking a study of red tide cysts. · Studying, designing and drawing specifications for potential solutions to flooding on Main Street in Northport The Action plan includes projected timelines for implementing the recommendations – some as early as later this year -- as well as estimated costs. The Plan also mentions potential funding sources for some of the proposed actions. The April summit, called by Supevisor Petrone and U.S. Rep. Steve Israel, came in response to continuing problems such as beach closings and shellfish bed closings that have resulted from water quality issues in the Northport Bay habitat, with the recognition that the restoration of Northport Harbor will be beneficial for Huntington and Centerport Harbors. Committee members include elected officials from the Town and the incorporated villages of Northport and Asharoken, federal, state and Suffolk county officials and agencies, representatives from local yacht clubs and interested citizens. The Committee will continue to accept public comment as it prepares its final report, expected later this year. Interested persons should contact the Town's Maritime Services Department at 631-351-3192.

 


9th Annual Women’s Networking Day to Focus on Empowering Today’s Woman


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/19/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Huntington Town Supervisor Frank Petrone and members of the Town Council invite residents to the Town's Ninth Annual Women's Networking Day and Awards Ceremony, which this year carries the theme "Empowering Today's Woman" and focuses on strategies to enable women to become successful in their personal endeavors. The Oct. 27 event, under the auspices of the Town's Division of Women's Services, will include more than 50 informational booths, where experts will provide attendees with answers and advice on a range of topics ranging from estate planning, domestic violence and divorce to stress, depression and dementia to dealing with financial concerns against the backdrop of the current difficult economic conditions. Residents will be able to discuss their individual situation with companies and organizations that may provide them with essential tools and/or solutions to help achieve personal success and economic self-sufficiency. Some of the featured booths this year include Jobcorp, Business Boutique, Pederson Krag Clinic and the Wellness Center. The Women's Division presents this annual event to help the public receive important information and learn about services offered by the Town's numerous non-profit organizations. The Town Board will also be honoring give exceptional women. The event will be held from 11 to 2:30 p.m. at the Larkfield Manor, 507 Larkfield Road, East Northport. General admission is $8 ($6 for seniors) and includes lunch. For information, call Rhonda Shepardson, director of Women's Services, at 631-351-3291, or e-mail rts@town.huntington.ny.us.

 


Huntington Accepts Donation of Equine Sculpture


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/13/2010

 
Motorists driving by Huntington's Fair Meadow Park at the intersection of Park Avenue and Pulaski Road may have recently caught a glimpse of a grazing chestnut-colored horse. This new addition to the Park is a welded steel sculpture created by Sandy Farkas, MD, a retired orthopedist, sculptor, and resident of Huntington Bay. When Dr. Farkas and his wife Jane recently made plans to relocate to Charleston, SC, they decided to leave behind Sandy's life-sized equine sculpture entitled Ferrous Equinous as a donation to the community. "The Town Board was delighted to accept this generous gift upon the recommendation of the Town's Public Art Advisory Committee," noted Supervisor Frank Petrone. "It is always gratifying to see one of Huntington's many accomplished artists make such a contribution to our community." "Huntington is blessed with a thriving cultural community, including many talented artists with expertise in a wide range of disciplines," agreed Councilman Mark Cuthbertson. "It's one of the reasons why our community is often referred to as the ‘Cultural Capital' of Long Island. Sandy's donation is a tribute to our artistic strength and diversity." Councilwoman Susan Berland, sponsor of the resolution accepting the donation, commented, "We have showcased the work of local and regional artists in a number of temporary public art installations. We are excited that this work is the fourth permanent addition to the Town's Public Art Collection. I look forward to the prospect of many more works of public art being created and installed throughout Huntington." The Town's first permanent public art acquisition was Town Hall Mobile commissioned in 1999 from Huntington Bay artist Mark Kuhn (1951-2009) for the lobby atrium of Town Hall. The second acquisition was Intervals of Prime #3, a large outdoor sculpture in Heckscher Park made of curving steel pipe that was purchased from the artist and Huntington native John Clement in 2004 entirely with private donations. Next to be added to the Town's public art collection was Sailing in Huntington Bay, a community mural project commission created by mural artist Garin Baker assisted by 21 teen apprentices supervised by Chris Ricco of the Huntington Youth Bureau's Project Excel. This mural was completed and installed in 2009 on the rear wall of Waldbaum's overlooking the new municipal parking lot on New York Avenue. "I'm particularly pleased that our Public Art Initiative makes a concerted effort to install work in a wide variety of locations and to reach all segments of our community," observed Councilwoman Glenda Jackson. "In addition to the latest permanent installation in Fair Meadows Park, the Town recently installed 100 artist-designed banners on lampposts and utility poles in Huntington Station, as well as teen poetry placards in the interior of the Town's HART bus system." "I hope that our residents find this latest public art installation as enjoyable as I do. The gently rolling turf of Fair Meadows Park makes a particularly appropriate setting for this sculpture," observed Councilman Mark Mayoka. Further information about Ferrous Equinous, the previous three Town Public Art Collection acquisitions, or other public art installations in Huntington can be obtained from the Town of Huntington Division of Cultural Affairs at 631-351-3099 or by viewing the listings on the Public Art Inventory on the Town's web site at http://town.huntington.ny.us.


 


Committee to Unveil Draft Action Plan for Northport Harbor


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/12/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Northport Harbor Water Quality Protection Committee has scheduled an Oct. 20 public meeting to present its Draft Action Plan for restoring Northport Harbor waters to good health. At the meeting, the Committee will be seeking public comment on the Action Plan, which identifies problems such as beach closings and shellfishery closings that have resulted from water quality issues in the Northport Bay habitat. The Action Plan, which recognizes that the restoration of Northport Harbor will be beneficial for Huntington and Centerport Harbors, suggests timelines and potential funding sources for solutions that will provide the necessary upgrades. The meeting, scheduled for 11 a.m. at Huntington Town Hall, 100 Main Street, Huntington, is the culmination of months of work by the Committee, which Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Rep. Steve Israel formed in April as an outgrowth of a water infrastructure summit. Co-chaired by Supervisor Petrone and Adrienne Esposito, executive director of Citizens Campaign for the Environment, the Committee includes elected officials from the Town and the incorporated villages of Northport and Asharoken, federal, state and Suffolk county officials and agencies, representatives from local yacht clubs and interested citizens. "The committee has worked diligently over the past several months and assembled what we feel is a realistic, implementable plan to effectively address the water quality issues that have affected residents' enjoyment of the harbors," Supervisor Petrone said, "We look forward to presenting the Action Plan to the public and listening to the public's comments and suggestions." "Government, environmental groups and the community have come together to produce what I hope the public will view as a bold but achievable roadmap to clean up the harbors," Esposito said. "Supervisor Petrone and I appreciate the hard work by all committee members to produce this Action Plan. We will not only be seeking public input to the plan but the public's help in implementing some of the programs." At the April summit, Congressman Israel said that the skills and resources needed to solve the problem would be brought to bear and pledged to help coordinate federal resources so the Committee could achieve maximum impact. Supervisor Petrone noted that the Town and the village of Northport are already engaged in a series of water quality improvement projects, including one managed by Cornell Cooperative Extension to identify and test water quality for bacterial loading at outflow pipes leading to Northport Harbor. Huntington also is involved in a study identifying outflow pipes operating without a permit that can be removed or brought into compliance with state law. The Town has also completed a study of new technology for special inserts in storm water catch basins that can filter out organic and bacterial contaminants and will look to place such systems in outflow pipes adjacent to bathing beaches.

 


Huntington Razes Three Dilapidated Houses to Make Way for Affordable Housing


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 10/6/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY -- The Town of Huntington today razed three dilapidated houses on Columbia Street, the latest step in a project to construct 16 units of affordable housing under the "Take Back the Blocks" program that is one of the key elements of the Town's Huntington Station revitalization plan. "This is a major milestone in a project that will help transform this neighborhood," said Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, who created the Take Back the Blocks program with his Town Board colleagues. "Replacing substandard living units with decent housing and replacing absentee landlords with residents who have the pride of ownership create the impetus for further revitalization." The town first announced plans for the project last year, and since then worked to complete acquisition of the three privately owned houses. The acquisition was finalized in July, with transfer of the parcels to the Town's Community Development Agency, which will be in charge of the development. The total purchase price of the acquired houses was $778, 000, split between Suffolk County and money from the Town's Affordable Housing Trust Fund. The County is also contributing $100,000 for infrastructure improvements. Construction will be funded by a $1.56 million state Restore NY Communities grant. The purchased houses represent about half the property for the site. The other half comes from property already owned by the Town. "We were happy to play a major role in developing this property for rehabilitation and to remove blight from the area," said County Executive Steve Levy. "Affordable housing is an important factor contributing toward downtown and community revitalization efforts." The 16 units will be contained in eight duplexes, each of 2,000 square feet including a garage and a legal accessory apartment. They will be made available to first-time homebuyers, selected by lottery, meeting income requirements. The tenants of the eight apartments will also have to meet income requirements. Priority will be given to residents of the Huntington school district. This program is open to people making 80 percent of the median income, or $57,000 for an individual and $81,450 for a family of four on the sliding scale. It is projected that the income from the apartment will help buyers qualify for a mortgage and meet carrying costs. An application is also pending with the New York State Affordable Housing Corporation to provide down payment assistance. Housing counseling will be required for all homeowners. The next stop is for the Community Development Agency to obtain a zone change and subdivide the property into eight parcels and to get the necessary County health department approvals. The plan is to hold a lottery to choose the homeowners next September and to have the homes occupied by December 2011. "This project further demonstrates the Town's commitment to Huntington Station," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. "One way to improve the quality of the community's housing stock is with stepped-up code enforcement, which we're doing. The other is to build the housing and sell it to people who will have pride of ownership and the incentive to keep up the property and preserve their investment. That is what this program aims to do." "The 'Take Back the Blocks' program is a crucial component to the revitalization of Huntington Station and goes a long way to provide an opportunity for community rehabilitation," said Councilwoman Susan Berland. "I look forward to welcoming the new home owners and renters and sharing the celebration of this project's completion with them." "This housing is desperately needed, and Columbia Street is a perfect location for it," Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said. "Especially important is that both the for-sale and rental units are together, which will help to keep costs in more of an affordable range, and the income from the rentals will help the owners meet their mortgage payments." Councilman Mark Mayoka said, "We appreciate the support from the County and the State that will help us implement this project and look forward to additional cooperation on other Huntington Station revitalization measures." "The Columbia Street project is one more tangible example of what we can do as a community if we work together," said Suffolk County Legislator Jon Cooper. "It will produce much-needed workforce housing so we can keep young professionals, including the sons and daughters of local families, living, working maintaining their roots right here in Huntington This is the third project under the Take Back the Blocks Program. A house at 32 East 6th Street in Huntington Station was purchased and rehabilitated by Housing Help Inc. with technical assistance from the Town. The Town also rehabilitated a house it purchased at 1 Tower Street; a closing with the winner of a lottery is expected soon.


 


Children's Festival and Crafts Fair at Crab Meadow Beach This Saturday


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/27/2010

 
The Town of Huntington is hosting the annual Children's Festival and Crafts Fair at Crab Meadow Beach in Northport this Saturday, October 2, from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. This event, sponsored by the Town of Huntington on behalf of the Child Care Council, includes craft vendors, bounce rides, a petting zoo, pony rides and all-day entertainment, and refreshments. This promises to be a fun-filled, inexpensive day for the whole family. There is a $5.00 fee per vehicle and all proceeds will be donated to the Child Care Council of Suffolk for its Parent Leadership Program. For further information call: 631-351-3233.

 


Petrone Cuts Spending for Second Year in a Row


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/22/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Supervisor Frank P. Petrone today presented a proposed 2011 budget that reduces spending for the second consecutive year and holds the line on taxes, even in the face of declining revenues due to the difficult economy and state-mandated increases in costs. "This is undoubtedly the leanest budget I have ever presented," Supervisor Petrone said in his budget message. Noting the financial strains brought on by the economy, he added, "Like our constituents, we must tighten our belts and continue to find ways to do more with less." In fact, the Supervisor noted in his budget message, while cutting spending for both operating expenses and capital projects, the Town "will continue to deliver the highest level of services to our seniors, our young people, our veterans, our handicapped population and our families. We will continue to see that our parks are maintained, our ball fields are ready for the sports leagues, our Senior Center continues to flourish and grow, our youth programs continue to serve thousands and win awards, and our quality of life improves. We will continue to see that our roads are paved and that needed drainage projects are funded." Highlights of the budget proposal include: · No tax increase in the Town's three major funds (General Fund, Part-Town Fund and Refuse Fund), and a 2% decrease in the Highway Fund tax. As a result, the Town portion of the average taxpayer's real property tax bill (for a home assessed at $4,100.00) will decrease by $8.68 · An $800,000 decrease in spending for operations, even in the face of mandated increases of $1.8 million in Health Insurance costs, and $2.1 million in New York State pension costs, mandates that continue to place pressure on the Town's budget. · A 22 percent decrease in overall capital spending, to $10.9 million, while doubling the amount of funding for Road Rehabilitation from $1.5 million to $3 million. · The elimination of 56 presently funded positions, reducing the Town workforce by 7.6 percent and saving $4.3 million. The 56 eliminated positions include 36 positions that have been held vacant this year and 20 from the estimated 38 employees expected to opt into the State's Early Retirement Incentive program. Those positions vacated by retirees that are not eliminated will either remain vacant for part of the year or be downgraded, resulting in an additional $200,000 in savings. The budget projects the lowest staffing model since 1996. · A continuing freeze on the salaries of elected and appointed personnel. · New efforts to increase revenue streams to offset stagnating revenues and investment income declines. These efforts include fee increases in those areas where a service is used by only a segment of our population, where fees have not kept pace with those of other Towns', or where the Town is offering a new service to a small portion of our population. "Finding ways to reduce the tax burden on our residents in 2011 did not come easily," Supervisor Petrone noted in his message. "We have had to reevaluate how we do business in order to conserve dollars at every opportunity" Among the measures he noted were; · Reducing debt service and saving $175,000 by eliminating the use of Bond Anticipation Notes · Making maximum use of the dollars contained in the debt service reserve accounts for the Resource Recovery Plant, to be sure that all such funding is used to underwrite the cost of the debt service for the plant. · Using modest amounts of funding from reserve accounts to blunt the fact that revenues such as the Mortgage Recording Tax are not growing significantly. · Re-evaluating the way in which Town Departments provide services to residents and looking for ways to streamline the delivery of those services. Each Department has been required to provide performance based measures, so that the Town can objectively evaluate the cost and manner in which it delivers services. · Money-saving energy initiatives, including replacing approximately 4,000 high-pressure sodium streetlight fixtures with energy efficient induction fixtures. This initiative will result in a reduced consumption of 2.2 million kilowatt-hours and a cost savings of $350,000 annually. In terms of capital spending, Supervisor Petrone noted that the Town this year is completing several major and long awaited capital projects, including Veterans Park in East Northport, the rehabilitation of Walt Whitman Road, the new Ice Rink at Dix Hills Park and the renovation of the North Parking Garage at the Huntington Train Station. The Town also is beginning several large projects that have been on the drawing boards for quite some time and for which it has finally received the necessary permits, including the Route 110 Street Enhancement, Phase II in Huntington Station, renovation of the South Parking Garage at the Huntington Train Station, the replacement of the roof on the Town Hall Annex and the addition of Solar panels to that roof, and the build-out of Breezy Park, which is currently underway. "In the last few years we have planned and brought to fruition a record number of capital projects," Supervisor Petrone said. "Now it is time for us to reevaluate our priorities and to finish what is on the drawing boards. By cutting back on capital spending, we will reduce the impact of debt service on future operating budgets." The Town Board scheduled public hearings on the budget proposal for Oct. 5 at 6 p.m. In other action, the Town Board: -- voted down a proposal to create a Huntington Station Transit Oriented Development District and rezone a 26-acre parcel to allow Avalon Bay Communities to build a 490-unit development in the district. -- authorized the Supervisor to enter into a contract with Kings Park Industries for Phase II of the Huntington Station Revitalization Route 110 streetscaping, covering New York Avenue from Olive Street to Pulaski toad and from Railroad Street to Pulaski Road. The $1.1 million project will be funded by a combination of a Federal grant and an appropriation from the Town's EOSPA Fund. The project will also include construction of a retaining wall along route 110, funded with a $50,000 Suffolk County Downtown Revitalization Grant, $50,000 from the Huntington Station Business Improvement District and 420,000 from the EOSPA fund. -- authorized a contract with Sony NY Management & Construction Corp. to replace the roof on the Town Hall annex. The Board also authorized a contract with Bayview Custom Construction Corp. to install a photovoltaic generating system on the roof of the Town Hall annex, to function as a renewable energy information tool; the photovoltaic project is being funded from the Town's federal stimulus program energy conservation block grant.

 


Skate Park, Boundless Playground Open at Veterans Park


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/21/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
East Northport, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and members of the Town Council today marked completion of the major renovations at Veterans Park with the opening of Long Island's first concrete bowl skate park and Mr. P's Playground, a fully accessible playground for children of all abilities. The Board also dedicated a bench in memory of Northport resident Thomas Newton. "With the opening of these two new attractions, Veterans Park becomes a jewel of the Huntington parks system, a place where residents covering a wide spectrum of ages and abilities will find facilities catering to their interests," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "We hope that residents from all corners of the Town will take advantage of all Veterans Park offers." The skate park, Huntington's second, is a state-of-the-art facility and Long Island's first concrete bowl skate park. Designed with input from the skateboarding community and from the Town's Skate Park Advisory committee, its impending completion created considerable buzz among skateboarders both on and off Long Island. "We asked skateboarders to tell us what they wanted, and this park's design reflects their ideas," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. "We expect this skate park will be even more popular than our current Greenlawn Park and should draw skateboarders from the entire metropolitan area." The skate park has a large plaza plus features for beginners, intermediate and advanced skateboarders. It was constructed by Laser Industries and California Skateparks at a total cost of $500,000. The Town received a $250,000 New York State Parks grant to cover half of the cost. Town funds are paying for the other $250,000. The skate park will be open year-round, weather permitting. During the school year, the skate park will operate from noon to dusk on weekdays and 10 a.m. to dusk on weekends. To help offset maintenance and staffing costs, users of the park will be asked to purchase a Town recreation identification card. The card costs $10 for Huntington residents under 17 years of age and $20 for residents 18 or older and is good for two years. Non-residents may purchase a one-year non-resident recreation identification card for $50. Those who choose not to purchase an annual pass may skate at a daily rate of $5 for residents and $10 for non-residents. All skaters are required to wear appropriate safety equipment, including an ANSI or SNELL - approved helmet as per manufacturer's specifications. Elbow pads and kneepads are optional. Children under the age of six are not allowed in the skate park. The playground is named in honor of Chris Pendergast, a courageous Northport teacher who has been battling ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease). Grateful for the inspiration, guidance and encouragement Mr. Pendergast provided them over the years, students at the Northport School District's Dickinson Avenue Elementary School embarked on a project to commemorate and honor their teacher and friend. After extensive research, the students decided on building a Boundless Playground – a specially designed playground where fully able children and children with disabilities can play and grow together. A letter-writing campaign, coupled with a passionate lobbying effort, resulted in the Town of Huntington and New York State agreeing to contribute the necessary funds to construct the playground. Mr. Pendergast attended today's ceremony. "Chris Pendergast's heroic battle with ALS has been an inspiration to all of us. We are honored that his legacy and the love his students have for him will be an example for the children of all abilities who will use this playground," Councilwoman Susan Berland said. Unlike other Town playgrounds that have been rehabilitated to meet updated standards for accessibility, this playground is designed as a completely integrated play area with challenging equipment and accessible surfaces. It contains different components that are designed to encourage varied modalities for all children, the fully able and those who have physical, sensory and developmental disabilities. It can be viewed as an opportunity to build social and motor skills, while engaging in active joyful outdoor recreation. Created with the assistance of the non-profit organization, Boundless Playgrounds, Inc., the project was funded with $500,000 from the town Environmental Open Space and Park Improvement (EOSPA) Bond Act and $50,000 in State grants, including one obtained by State Sen. John Flanagan. The East Northport Chamber of Commerce, Northport High School Honor Society and A Midwinter Night's Dream purchased the bench in memory of Mr. Newton, a financial analyst and internet commerce specialist who was active on the boards of many civic organizations, including the Board of Architectural and Historic Review in Northport village and Northport Tennis Club. Mr. Netwon, who was stricken with ALS a few years back and rode on a few occasions with Mr. Pendergast and the Ride For Life Program, died in June. "Like Chris Pendergast, Thomas Newton's battle with ALS inspired students and adults alike. His contributions to the community will be missed. This bench is a small but important way to keep the memory of all he did alive," Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said. Veterans Park is part of the veterans Park Complex, on formerly U.S. Veterans Administration property, which is being developed in partnership with Federal, State, County and community sponsors as a regional park offering a range of passive and active outdoor recreational activities. The Complex consists of the 82+ acre former Benjamin property, now known as Knolls Park; Meadowlark Park; Veterans Nature Study Area; and Veterans Park. It covers a total of nearly 200 acres in Northport and East Northport. The shared Town and County acquisition of the Knolls Park on December 29, 2000 used funds from the County Greenways Program for 20 acres with the stipulation that it be developed for active recreational use. Recommended uses, including the skate park and boundless playground, were part of a master plan formulated the Veterans Park Citizens Advisory Committee chaired by Cliff Austen from the East Northport Chamber of Commerce. Community input was provided at public planning and viewing sessions. "I commend the committee for setting forth an ambitious master plan for development of the park, providing a road map for a facility that will be enjoyed by residents throughout the Town," Councilman Mark Mayoka said. "After years of hard work, everyone involved has delivered a truly open community park for all, and I hope that children and parents will enjoy the result of this collaborative effort," Sen. John Flanagan said. "This park will provide everyone in the community with a place to call their own and I am proud to have played a role in working to secure the funding needed to make this a reality. The fact that this great effort also serves as a fitting tribute to Mr. Pendergast and Mr. Newton makes it even more special and significant." "The joint purchase of the open space that has become the beautiful Veterans Park was my first major piece of legislation," said Suffolk County Legis. Jon Cooper. "As I round out my tenure as a county legislator, it seems fitting that I'm joining the Huntington Town Board in celebrating the completion of such a grand renovation of this wonderful park. It is truly gratifying to know that this park will endure and provide a safe place for young people to pursue the benefits of an active and healthy lifestyle for many years to come." The renovations to Veterans Park have included creation of synthetic turf athletic fields, installation of lighting, construction of a new comfort station and the addition of parking, as well as the skateboard park and boundless playground.


 


Petrone Places Town Employees on Alert for Storm


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 9/1/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – Huntington Town Supervisor Frank P. Petrone today told Town department heads that all Town employees should be on alert that they may be needed this weekend to deal with the potential effects of Hurricane Earl should the storm, now scheduled to pass east of Long Island, cause damage in the Town. Supervisor Petrone issued his directive during a briefing on the storm's progress and on the Town's preparations. Each of the department heads described their staff's preparations. For example, the Highway and General Services Departments noted that equipment was being put in place should it be needed for evacuations and that emergency generators have been fueled and tested. The Department of Environmental Waste Management has arranged for additional staffing at the Town's wastewater treatment plant. And the Department of Human Services has 1,000 meals and bottled water available should it be necessary to open the Town's Village Green Senior Center for evacuees. Supervisor Petrone noted that the Town participated in a conference call today with County Executive Steve Levy and other elected officials to coordinate possible responses and that his liaison to fire and rescue services was participating in regular briefings tracking the storm's progress. He noted that if necessary, he would activate the Town's Emergency Operations Center to coordinate the Town's efforts.


 


Judge Orders Receiver for East Northport House


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/31/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
East Northport, NY – Acting on an application by Huntington Town, a Suffolk County District Court Judge has ordered appointment of a temporary receiver for 42 Norton Drive in East Northport, a move aimed at stemming a recurrence of the activity that prompted the Town Board to declare the property a repeat public nuisance. Judge C. Stephen Hackeling issued the order August 27 after a hearing at which Town attorneys presented evidence, including testimony from neighbors, chronicling arrests at the address and other activity that the Judge concluded "demonstrates the possible existence of multiple, continuing violations of the New York State and Huntington Town Laws and ordinances and that the neighbors of the defendant would suffer irreparable injury" without the appointment of a receiver. Named in the suit was the property's owner, Salvatore Napoli. The receiver, whom Judge Hackeling will select from a list of three names to be provided by the Town, will have the authority to inspect the interior of the house up to twice a week, to install security cameras on the exterior of the house and to hire security agents to patrol the exterior. Judge Hackeling also continued the order restraining Napoli from violating Town ordinances and State and Town laws and from having communication or contact with any neighbors who filed affidavits or testified at the hearing. "Our concern all along centered on how the activity at 42 Norton has created a public nuisance that seriously is affecting neighbors' quality of life," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "Judge Hackeling's order, appointing a receiver with the authority to monitor activity inside and outside 42 Norton, is a good first step toward eliminating the activity that produced the nuisance and restoring to residents the peaceful enjoyment of their own property and of the neighborhood." The Town Board authorized the action against Napoli following a hearing at the Aug. 3 Town Board meeting. The Board deemed the property a repeat public nuisance under Chapter 50 of the Town Code because of multiple arrests at that location within the past year for offenses listed in the Code. Other remedies under the Code include eviction of the occupants or tenants and/or seizure and forfeiture of the property. The Town will continue to enforce the provisions of the Code and to take whatever action is needed to remove the nuisance permanently.

 


Huntington Station Community Ourteach Center Opens


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/19/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY – Huntington Town, with participation from Suffolk County, today opened a Community Outreach Center in Huntington Station and began accepting calls to its hotline with information that might be useful in Town code enforcement and County police criminal investigations. The Outreach Center, in a Huntington Housing Authority building at 5 Lowndes Avenue, is intended to serve as a focal point for residents to provide information about quality of life complaints, such as illegal housing and other code violations. The Town is basing the officers assigned to the Code Enforcement Task force at the Outreach Center. The Suffolk County Police Department has also assigned an officer to be stationed at the Outreach Center and to work closely with the Town Code Enforcement officers on quality of life complaints, such as illegal housing and other code violations. Representatives from other Town and County departments may also be at the Outreach Center on a rotating basis. The Outreach Center will be open from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The Town established the hotline, 423-STOP (7867), so that callers can pass on information that might be useful in criminal or code enforcement investigations. The information can be reported anonymously; callers will be given case numbers so they can receive updates on the outcome of the provided information. The hotline will be staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week. "We want people to know that government is as close as the office down the block, or the phone call that will be answered, 24-7," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "If we -- the Town, the County and the community -- continue working together, we can defeat the criminal elements that have affected residents' quality of life." County Executive Steve Levy noted that basing a Suffolk Police Officer at the Outreach Center is part of a multi-pronged effort to further enhance police presence in Huntington Station, including increasing the hours of intensive patrols, employing ‘park and walk' patrols at strip shopping centers, and increasing attention at known hot spots of criminal activity. "We are continuing our commitment to ridding the community of gangs, guns, drugs and random violence," said Levy. "Our police presence at the Outreach Center exemplifies the very visible approach we are taking to preserving the quality of life this community." "This Outreach Center brings government closer to the community and helps us enlist the community in more quickly identifying and addressing problems and needs," said Councilman Mark Cuthbertson. Other measures in the multi-pronged effort include an increased use of surveillance cameras and coordinated enforcement efforts with federal, state and other County law enforcement agencies. The Town is also launching a major effort to enlist landlords' cooperation in eliminating conditions that adversely area residents' quality life. Landlords who fail to cooperate will face the financial effects of the heightened crackdown on violations of Town Code that has been underway for several months. The County has also pledged to work with the Town to identify and address housing issues in the community, including illegal apartments and code violations and is supporting state legislation allowing the Town to create a Code Violations Bureau to more quickly and efficiently prosecute persons charged with violating Town Codes. "I am pleased to be a part of the opening of the Huntington Station Community Outreach Center," commented Councilwoman Susan A. Berland. " It is vital that the community knows that not only are public safety officers available to them at this location, but also a member of the Suffolk County Police Department. Residents should also make sure that they avail themselves of our hotline number to assist both the Town and County in addressing the needs of the Huntington Station community. By working together, we can make a difference in Huntington Station." "This is a community center, and we hope the community will take advantage of this opportunity to interact with government and the resources provided here," Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said. "We also hope this office will create the presence that will deter those who would bring crime to Huntington Station." Councilman Mark Mayoka said, "This Outreach Center is an example of how the Town of Huntington, Suffolk County and the Huntington Housing Authority can work together for the benefit of the residents of Huntington Station and proactively address the community's crime and code enforcement issues."


 


Public Auction of Surplus Vehicles and Equipment


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/17/2010

 
The Town of Huntington will be holding a public auction of surplus vehicles and equipment on August 24, 2010 at the office of David R. Maltz & Co.,155 Terminal Dr., Plainview. (www.maltzauctions.com) Inspection starts at 9 a.m.; the auction starts at 10:30.

 


ADVISORY LIFTED AT CRESCENT BEACH


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/16/2010

 
The Suffolk County Department of Health Services has lifted the advisory that closed Crescent Beach to bathing because of a water sample that found high levels of bacteria.

 


CRESCENT BEACH CLOSED FOR BATHING


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/13/2010

 
The Suffolk County Department of Health Services has closed Crescent Beach to bathing because of a water sample that found high levels of bacteria. It is expected that the ban will continue through the weekend. The beach remains open for sunbathing. Residents wanting to go into the water can use nearby Fleets Cove Beach as an alternative.

 


Code Crackdown Cites More Illegal Apartments


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/12/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY – For the third time in the past four months, Huntington Code Enforcement Officers, in coordination with Suffolk County Police, executed search warrants that uncovered four illegal apartments at two locations in Huntington Station, resulting in the issuance of 11 summonses for Town Code infractions and six notices of violation of state codes. At 215 Fifth Avenue, the Code Enforcement Officers found illegal apartments in the basement and on the second level. Summonses were issued for the two illegal apartments, as well as for an illegally finished basement, an illegal attic conversion, hazardous electrical wiring, improper storage of commercial vehicles and failure to register the apartments, as required by Town Code. Notices of violation were issued for missing smoke detectors, missing carbon monoxide detectors and interior door locks blocking egress. The Code Enforcement officers placed a hazardous conditions notice on the basement apartment. At 26 Beverly Rd., Code Enforcement officers found illegal apartments in the basement and over an attached garage. Four summonses were issued, for the two illegal apartments, for an illegally finished basement and for a two-story addition with no certificate of occupancy. Notices of violation were issued for missing smoke detectors, missing carbon monoxide detectors and interior door locks blocking egress. The Code Enforcement officers placed a hazardous conditions notice on the basement apartment The execution of these search warrants follow similar efforts in May and July at six locations, also in Huntington Station, that found a total of 14 illegal dwelling units at what were supposed to be single family homes and resulted in the issuance of 25 summonses. These efforts are an outgrowth of the Code Enforcement Task force Supervisor Frank P. Petrone formed last Fall as an outgrowth of the Huntington Station Action Coalition. The task force, which uses 40 percent of the Town's code enforcement officers, has conducted 955 investigations since Oct. 1, issued 1,222 notices of violation and 324 summonses, not counting the ones stemming from the most recent search warrant executions. Of those investigations, 349 have been for illegal apartments, rooming houses and overcrowding. In measures sponsored by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, the Town also recently strengthened Town Code to require landlords of Section 8 housing to register with the Town and submit to inspections. The Town also is in the process of increasing penalties for illegal or substandard apartments and, in measures sponsored by Supervisor Petrone, is amending Town code so summonses can be issued immediately for infractions that now require notices of violation of state code before a summons can be issued. The Town is also moving the Code Enforcement Task Force to a Community Outreach Center being opened at 5 Lowndes Ave., Huntington Station, and is opening a telephone hotline to accept information about possible Code or other violations.

 


Suffolk, Huntington Officials Cooperate on Measures to Enhance Police Presence in Huntington Station


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/6/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Hauppauge, NY – Suffolk County and Huntington Town officials today announced a multi-pronged approach to further enhance police presence in Huntington Station, including increasing the hours of intensive patrols and the stationing of a Suffolk County Police Department officer at a Community Outreach Center the Town is opening in the community. The measures, which also include increased use of surveillance cameras and the establishment of a hotline to accept information about criminal activity and Town code violations, were an outgrowth of a meeting held August 5 at County Executive Steve Levy's office and chaired by Levy and Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone. Attending the meeting were Town and County elected officials, department heads and representatives from the Huntington Housing Authority, at whose headquarters the Community Outreach center will be located. Central to the meeting's purpose was the desire to develop cooperative approaches that will supplement the continuing, visible law enforcement presence in the community since last year by using a targeted, laser-beam approach to pinpoint crime hotspots and concentrate resources. "Despite the decision by the school board to move students out of Huntington Station, Suffolk County and our police department will be continuing our commitment to ridding the community of gangs, guns, drugs and random violence," said Levy. "Our police presence at the Outreach Center will serve as another reminder to the good citizens of Huntington Station that the police and the county are on their side." "These measures reinforce our commitment to work cooperatively with Suffolk County to combat our common enemy: the criminal elements who have affected the quality of life for Huntington Station's law abiding residents," Supervisor Petrone said. "By linking our resources, the whole truly will be greater than the sum of the individual parts." The multi-pronged plan includes: Police presence at the Outreach Center. Both Suffolk police and Town code enforcement personnel will be based at the Community Outreach Center, on Lowndes Avenue. The Outreach Center will serve as a focal point for residents to provide information about quality of life complaints, such as illegal housing and other code violations. The Town will be basing the officers assigned to its Code Enforcement Task Force – 40 percent of the Town's code enforcement personnel --at the Outreach Center. Establishment of a Hotline to accept information. People will be encouraged to call the hotline, 631-424-3658, with information that might be useful in criminal or code enforcement investigations. The information can be reported anonymously; callers will be given case numbers so they can receive updates on the outcome of the provided information. The hotline should begin operation next week. Expanded police patrols in Huntington Station. Specialized police units now patrolling until 2 a.m. only on certain days will extend those patrols past 2 a.m., seven days a week. "Park and Walk" patrols at strip shopping centers. Officers will exit their cars at area shopping centers and patrol on foot. Increased attention to known hot spots of gang, gun and drug activity. Increased use of surveillance cameras. The Huntington Station Business Improvement Ddistrict has placed 26 surveillance cameras throughout the community and made available to police a laptop to monitor those cameras. Coordinated enforcement efforts with federal, state and Suffolk district attorney and sheriff's department officials Those attending the meeting included Suffolk County Legis. Jon Cooper; Huntington Councilmen Mark Cuthbertson and Mark Mayoka; Police Commissioner Richard Dormer; Huntington Public Safety Director Bruce Richard; and Dr. William Spencer, chairman, Robert Fonti, vice chairman, and Siela Bynoe, executive director of the Housing Authority.

 


Huntington Station Redevelopment Measures Advance


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/4/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Huntington Town Board at its Aug. 3 meeting took two steps central to Huntington Station's continued redevelopment, formally approving the acquisition by eminent domain of the former automobile repair shop at 1000 New York Avenue and the purchase of the last remaining privately owned parcel for what is to become Gateway Park. The action on 1000 New York Avenue was a required step in the process of acquiring the abandoned repair shop so it can be demolished and replaced with a mixed-use building. The Town will now send an offer to purchase the property for its appraised value of $535,000; if the property owner refuses, the Town will proceed with the condemnation in State Supreme Court. The Town has been trying for some time to encourage the redevelopment of the property and secured a $1.15 million Restore NY Communities grant to assist in the demolition and construction of the mixed-use, retail and residential building. When a formal agreement with the owner of the property could not be reached, the Town started the process to acquire the property and take over its replacement. The property is central to the Town's redevelopment plans, which includes transformation of a 17,000-square foot right of way in front of the parcel at New York Avenue and Olive Street into a pedestrian-friendly, aesthetically pleasing public plaza. The Town is working the State Department of Transportation to obtain the permits necessary to construct the plaza. Located across the street from 1000 New York Avenue is the site of the planned Gateway Park, which has been under consideration for some time as the Town acquired the privately-owned parcels. The last remaining parcel under private ownership was the 0.11-acre plot owned by John Marcinka located on the north side of an alley between Lowndes Avenue and Academy Place. In May, the Town Board held a public hearing to acquire the parcel through eminent domain and authorized the Town Attorney to begin condemnation proceedings. Mr. Marcinka, however, subsequently agreed to sell the parcel to the Town at the appraised price of $70,000, avoiding the expense of litigation in a condemnation proceeding. Obtaining the Marcinka parcel also paves the way for transfer of property owned by New York State that will complete the acquisition and allow for planning of the park's features to be developed. As the Town continues to weigh alternatives, the Town signed a contract with the Long Island Community Agricultural Network to manage a community garden as a temporary use of the site. The garden opened this summer and has become immensely popular, with a waiting list for plots. "These actions reinforce the Town's commitment to projects that will continue Huntington Station's revitalization and underscore the progress we have made to bring them to fruition. Razing a community eyesore and building a plaza that will attract people to stores, housing and a park nearby are measures that define revitalization," said Supervisor Frank Petrone. In other action, the Board: -- authorized the Town Attorney to take what he deems appropriate action against the owner of the property located at 42 Norton Drive, East Northport, which following a public hearing earlier in the meeting was deemed a repeat public nuisance under Chapter 50 of the Town Code. Under the Code, the action could include a temporary restraining order, preliminary injunction, eviction of the occupants or tenants and/or seizure and forfeiture of the property. -- voted to apply the historic overlay district to property at the former Town Hall at 227 Main Street, Huntington, and authorized its use as a boutique hotel. -- approved a contract with L. K. McLean Associates for up to $24,800 for professional engineering and surveying services to help prepare construction plans and specifications for restoration of areas affected by a July 8 brush fire at the Town landfill on Town Line Road, including repairing damaged gas venting structures and drainage structures and restoring the landfill cap components. -- approved a renewal of the cooperation agreement between the Town and the incorporated villages in the Town so that all will participate in the Community Development Block Grant Program funded by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. -- approved entering into an non-binding memorandum of understanding with the Connecticut-based company Mutualink to help create a pilot program that would create a community-wide emergency communications system. The program aims to include all first responder agencies in the Town. -- scheduled a Sept. 21 public hearing on a proposed Local Law to impose term limits on elected Town officials.

 


Huntington Gets High Marks for Energy Programs


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/3/2010

 
The United States Department of Energy has given high marks to the Town of Huntington's implementation of five projects funded by its $1.725 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant, noting in a report that the Town demonstrated "exemplary organization and planning for their EECBG approved activities." "The monitoring team was impressed by the grantee's experience and knowledge as well as their grant planning and overall enthusiasm for energy efficiency and conservation," the report dated July 28, 2010 noted. The projects include several programs to boost the Town's energy efficiency and one program offering direct assistance to homeowners. "This report further validates Huntington's commitment both to energy conservation and the careful administration of grant awards," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "Town residents will benefit as the Town cuts its energy costs. We also hope Town residents will enjoy the direct benefit and sign up for the in-home energy efficiency surveys we are offering." The report was based on a July 15 visit by five DOE officials. They met with a Town team that included Chief Sustainability Officer Terese Kinsley, Comptroller Tracy Yogman and Purchasing Director Lori Finger. The team also included Philip Ingerman from Supervisor Petrone's office, Deputy Comptroller Andy Persich, Traffic and Transportation Director Steve McGloin and Assistant Town Engineer Dean Leonardi. After meeting with the Town team, the DOE panel concluded Huntington is "very organized, well prepared and moving forward on all of their projects." The projects include o The Residential Energy Efficiency Retrofit Program ($345,000), in which at least 2,000 Town homeowners will be offered home energy surveys to show them low-cost measures to make their homes more energy efficient. LI Green, the not-for-profit technical service provider that will perform the surveys for the next two years, began making home visits in late June. The Town is ramping up a marketing campaign to sign up interested homeowners. o Installation of energy efficient streetlights ($830,200), replacing 2,400 streetlights with induction lighting. The Town's installer, Welsbach Electric Corp., started work in early June and is expected to complete the project by next year. o A solar panel renewable-energy 28-kilowatt generation project for Town Hall ($225,000). The Town has opened bids for this contract and is in the contract award phase. o LEED feasibility analysis and energy improvements for Town facilities ($225,000). A LIPA-funded study by Horizon Engineering has identified a list of Facility Improvement Measures. The Town will issue a request for proposals for the design and installation of the energy efficiency upgrades. o Development of a Townwide Long Range Energy and Sustainability Plan ($100,000). The Town will issue a request for proposals for a consultant to identify and pre-plan a schedule of energy improvement projects for the next decade. The plan will allow Huntington to compete for future DOE grants. Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said, "One of my priorities as a member of the Town Board is to make Huntington a leader in energy conservation and sustainability." He noted that he had urged the Town to create the position of chief sustainability officer. "We were the first LI Town to put a trained energy engineer on staff," said Councilman Cuthbertson. "It proves that with the right people, good programs like EECBG and an across the board commitment from Washington, D.C. to Town Hall our energy goals are achievable."

 


Town to Begin Taping Meetings for Broadcast


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 8/3/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Aug. 3 Town Board meeting will mark an important communications milestone: It will be the first to be recorded for broadcast on Cablevision and Verizon government access channels and for viewing on the Town's website. Equipment recently installed in the Town Board meeting room will capture a digital video and audio record of the proceedings, which will be broadcast beginning Thursday on Channel 38 for Verizon FIOS customers. Cablevision will determine air times on its system on the government access Channel 18. At the same time, those seeking to view the meeting on-line will find a link on the home page of the Town's website. Planning Board and Zoning Board of Appeals meetings will also be recorded and aired in a similar fashion. "This is an important next step in better communicating with our residents," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "These broadcasts will help us bring government closer to the people, increase transparency and make it possible for people to see directly what happens at our board meetings without having to rearrange their schedules to attend in person." Councilwoman Susan Berland, who sponsored the Town Board resolution authorizing the purchase and installation of TV broadcast technology, said, "The televising of our public meetings has been a long time in the making and I am thrilled that together with the Supervisor, I was able to bring this initiative to fruition." She added, "I believe televising public meetings increases transparency, as it brings the issues facing our Town to the homes of our residents. I am looking forward to the airing on the governmental access channels of our Town Board meetings and those of the Zoning Board and Planning Board." The cost of the new TV and audio equipment including computer interface and hard drive to store the digital signals was $68,000. The equipment was paid for from cable access grants from Cablevision Systems Inc. and Verizon New York Inc. negotiated as part of their respective franchise agreements with the Town of Huntington. The Town is developing a schedule for broadcasting the Town meetings and other related programming on Verizon Channel 38. The Town will assume full control over programming on Cablevision Channel 18 in October, until which time Cablevision will remain responsible for scheduling Huntington's programming.

 


New Initiative to Fight Huntington Station Crime


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/23/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Huntington Councilman Mark Cuthbertson today announced a new initiative to work with Huntington Station residents in driving out the elements responsible for criminal acts and violations seriously affecting the community's quality of life. The new initiative will include establishment of a hotline for residents to relay information about criminal activity and Town Code violations, as well as establishment of a Community Outreach office. The initiative will also include a major effort to enlist landlords' cooperation in eliminating conditions that adversely area residents' quality life. Landlords who fail to cooperate will face the financial effects of the heightened crackdown on violations of Town Code that has been underway for several months. The effort will also see heightened cooperation between the Town and Suffolk County, the result of a meeting held July 21 including Supervisor Petrone, Councilman Cuthbertson, County Executive Steve Levy and Police Commissioner Richard Dormer. The County pledged to work with the Town to identify and address housing issues in the community, including illegal apartments and code violations. "This is everybody's responsibility," Supervisor Petrone said. "We all need to work together – residents, landlords and those charged with public safety – to help us return control back to the community. "We expect the increased influx of information from this effort will provide the tools to help us deploy our resources more effectively." Other facets of this initiative include: -- the Town's plan to establish a hotline for residents to report complaints about code, quality of life and criminal violations. Residents will be able to make complaints anonymously, while being given case numbers they can use to track County and Town responses. The Town also plans to open a Community Outreach Office in Huntington Station "Residents often note that they don't know where to bring their complaints, or that once they file a complaint, there is no follow-up. With this effort, we will work together to make sure that information brought to our attention receives the appropriate response," Councilman Cuthbertson said. -- the County's support of state legislation allowing the Town to create a Code Violations Bureau to more quickly and efficiently prosecute persons charged with violating Town Codes. -- an agreement by the County and Town to hold regularly scheduled meetings at which community members can interact with their elected and appointed representatives. -- increased support at both the Town and County levels of the Neighborhood Watch programs being formed in Huntington Station. The move to engage the community's landlords is a natural extension of the Code Enforcement crackdown that since it began Oct. 1 has seen almost 300 summonses and more than 1,100 notices of violation issued for offenses including illegal apartments and properties overrun by litter, debris and graffiti. The Town has also moved to seize five houses for under Chapter 50 of Town Code. That section of the Code allows houses to be declared repeat public nuisances because of arrests at the locations for conduct such as drug sales or prostitution. The Code Enforcement crackdown has included: · Creation of a Code Enforcement Task Force, using 40 percent of Town code enforcement officers. Since Oct. 1, the task force has conducted 920 investigations, resulting in the issuance of 1172 notices of violation and 300 summonses · Stepped up use of search warrants to confirm existence of illegal housing and to close it down. Search warrants executed at 6 Huntington Station locations in the past two months found illegal housing at all locations · Stiffened penalties for code violations · Holding a Code Enforcement Summit · Enlisting local state legislators to introduce the bill creating code enforcement bureau to take prosecutions of violations away from the courts "We appreciate the pledge of additional help from police so we can more effectively invoke the provisions of Chapter 50," Councilman Cuthbertson said. "We are all committed to making Huntington Station a safer and more pleasant place to live," Supervisor Petrone said. "By working together, we will drive out the influences that have kept us from realizing those goals."

 


Project Play and St. John's Camp to be Open Tuesday


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/20/2010

 
The Huntington School District informs us that it has fixed the water main break at Jack Abrams Intermediate School. As a result, Project Play and St. John's Camp will be open tomorrow, Tuesday, July 20, 2010.

 


Avalon Bay Sets Dates for Public Information Sessions


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/15/2010

 
AvalonBay has issued the following press release on a schedule of public information sessions: P R E S S A D V I S O R Y For Immediate Release Contact: Judy White 631-730-2710 516-236-4245 AVALONBAY SETS DATES FOR PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSIONS FOR AVALON HUNTINGTON STATION AvalonBay has set three dates for the Public Information Sessions for residents to learn the facts on the proposed development Avalon Huntington Station. Date Time Location August 11 6-9 p.m. Avalon Court North, 100 Court North, Melville August 26 6-9 p.m. St. Hugh of Lincoln 21 East 9th Street, Huntington Station John Fischer Room September 13 6-9 p.m. Avalon Court North, 100 Court North, Melville -30-

 


Statement on Supervisor Petrone’s Medical Condition


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/13/2010

 
Supervisor Frank P. Petrone is undergoing treatment in Huntington Hospital for back problems. He is in contact with Town Hall and Town Hall is in contact with him as he continues to conduct Town business.

 


Judge Dismisses Suit Over Melville Affordable Housing


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/9/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Melville, NY – A U.S. District Court judge has dismissed allegations in a suit challenging the Town's actions with respect to a proposed affordable housing project in Melville, clearing the path for development of up to 117 one-bedroom units on Ruland Road. In his decision dated July 8, Judge Denis Hurley agreed with the Town's contentions that the allegations brought by a group calling itself the Fair Housing in Huntington Committee and other plaintiffs had been made well after the statute of limitations for making such claims. The plaintiffs first raised their allegations about the project called The Sanctuary at Ruland Road in an amendment to a suit they brought against the Town over The Greens development in Melville. Judge Hurley dismissed the allegations and held that "they are two separate housing developments." He continued, "Plaintiffs have not identified a single unlawful practice with regards to their Sanctuary claims that continued into the limitations period." The Town will continue to vigorously defend the suit involving the Greens. In March, the Town Planning Board approved the site plan for the project, subject to the meeting of certain conditions. The next step is for the developer to submit final plans, after which it would apply for building permits. "This project will help satisfy a growing need – for housing that young people entering the workforce can afford and for seniors looking to downsize while staying in the community. Judge Hurley's decision allows this much-needed project to proceed," Supervisor Frank Petrone said. Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said, "We are pleased that Judge Hurley upheld the Town's arguments and that the developer can move ahead. The need for this type of housing increases every day." Councilwoman Susan Berland said, "I am very glad that the court has cleared the way for the development of the Ruland Road project. This project has been stalled for too long, it is now time put the litigation behind us and build these much-needed one-bedroom affordable units for the residents of the Town of Huntington." Councilwoman Glenda Jackson said. "This project will provide an opportunity for multi-generational housing, which will help keep our best and brightest young here as well as our seniors. I look forward to the development's progress." Councilman Mark Mayoka said, "I am encouraged by the results of Judge Hurley's ruling and hope that we will be able to recover the legal fees that we have expended."

 


Deadline Extended on Transit Oriented Development District


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/8/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Town Board, at its July 6 meeting, voted to extend until Sept. 21 the deadline for acting on the proposal to create the Huntington Station Transit Oriented Development district and on an application by Avalon Bay Communities for a rezoning that would allow construction of a 490-unit development on a 26.6-acre site in the district. This is the second extension of the time in which to act, following a March 9 public hearing on the proposal. At its May 17 meeting, the Board voted to extend the deadline to Sept. 5 so it could fully review the comments at the public hearing and changes Avalon Bay has made from its original proposal. The vote on the most recent extension was 3-2, with Council Members Susan Berland (the sponsor), Mark Cuthbertson and Mark Mayoka voting in favor. Supervisor Frank Petrone and Councilwoman Glenda Jackson opposed the measure, with both calling any effort to further extend the deadline premature. In other action, the Board; -- scheduled Aug. 3 public hearings on four proposals to amend the Town Code so that Code Enforcement officers can more quickly remedy unsafe conditions in the case of dilapidated, collapsed or vermin-infested structures and so they can more efficiently prosecute Code violators. The need for the changes became apparent during the ongoing Code Enforcement Task Force's crackdown on illegal apartments. Town Code Enforcement officers found it necessary to invoke State Codes to cite violators of requirements for smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors and rodent control, as well as minimum bedroom space requirements. Making the requirements part of Town Code will establish a mechanism that will make it easier to prosecute violators and impose greater fines. The proposed changes also provide a more comprehensive list of conditions for which a building can be deemed unsafe, hazardous, unsanitary or dilapidated. -- held public hearings on proposals to acquire by condemnation property at 1000 New York Avenue, Huntington Station, as part of the Huntington Station redevelopment, and to apply the Historic Building Overlay District to property at 227 Main Street, Huntington (the former Town Hall building). The owners of that property have applied for permission to use the property as a boutique hotel -- authorized the Town Attorney to take action against an unauthorized used car business at 324 and 320A Depot Rd., Huntington Station

 


Crackdown on Illegal Apartments Continues


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/7/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY -- Continuing the Town's crackdown on illegal apartments, Code Enforcement officers, in coordination with Suffolk County police, executed search warrants at four locations July 1, finding illegal apartments at all of the locations. The Town placed notices of hazardous conditions at three locations and issued a total of 14 summonses and 12 notices of violation to the owners of the houses. "Houses with violations such as these affect the quality of life for tenants and neighbors alike," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "We are continuing our crackdown to ensure that rental housing units in the Town are properly registered and comply with Town codes." At 216 Fifth Ave., Huntington Station, the Code Enforcement officers found that a garage had illegally been converted to an apartment. Summonses were issued for illegal conversion and for failure to register the garage as a rental unit as required by Town Code. Three notices of violation were issued for missing smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. The officers placed a hazardous conditions notice on the garage apartment. At 18 Eleventh Ave., Huntington Station, the Code Enforcement officers found an illegal first-level apartment and the illegal conversion of a garage into an apartment, as well as interior alterations that had created hazardous conditions in a bedroom, as well as a failure to register the rental units with the Town. A total of four summonses were issued, as well as three notices of violation for missing carbon monoxide and smoke detectors and interior dead bolting of doors. A notice of hazardous conditions was placed on the first-level bedroom. At 201 Fourth Ave., Huntington Station, Code Enforcement officers found an illegal first-level apartment and issued summonses for the illegal apartment and failure to register. The notices of violation were issued for missing carbon monoxide and smoke detectors and interior dead bolting of doors. The owner of record for all three houses is David Ney of Bayville. The fourth location was 82 Columbia St., Huntington Station. Code Enforcement officers found two illegal apartments – in the basement and in the garage – and issued six summonses (for an illegal basement apartment, an illegal finished basement, an illegal garage conversion, hazardous electrical wiring, litter and debris and a dwelling structure not weather/water tight. The officers also issued three notices of violation (for a missing smoke and carbon monoxide detectors and interior dead bolting of doors) and placed a notice of hazardous conditions on the basement and garage. The house is in foreclosure and is currently owned by a mortgage company. The former owner still lives in the house. The execution of these search warrants follow a similar effort in May at two locations, also in Huntington Station, that found a total of eight dwelling units at what were supposed to be single family homes and resulted in the issuance of 11 summonses. These efforts are an outgrowth of the code enforcement task force Supervisor Petrone formed last Fall as an outgrowth of the Huntington Station Action Coalition. The task force, which uses 40 percent of the Town's code enforcement officers, has conducted 878 investigations since Oct. 1, issued 1,122 notices of violation and 276 summonses, not counting the ones stemming from the most recent search warrant executions. Of those investigations, 310 have been for illegal apartments, rooming houses and overcrowding. "As we execute these warrants, we also learn about necessary revisions to the Town Code to speed enforcement," Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. "We are committed to doing all we can to ensure that all rental apartments in the Town meet required standards and comply with the law." In measures sponsored by Councilman Cuthbertson, the Town also recently strengthened Town Code to require landlords of Section 8 housing to register with the Town and submit to inspections. The Town also is in the process of increasing penalties for illegal or substandard apartments. Other revisions stemming from the July 1 warrants are pending.

 


2010 Pius Scholarship Winners Named


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/7/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

Supervisor Frank Petrone and the Town Council are joined by Emily Pius in congratulating Donald Pius scholarship winners Tereance Lynch and Joseph Elijah Pardo.
 
Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and the members of the Town Council congratulate five graduates from area high schools as winners of this year's Donald A. Pius Scholarships. The scholarships, administered by the Huntington Youth Bureau Youth Development Research Institute, are awarded annually to five graduating seniors in the Town of Huntington who demonstrate academic excellence and good character through exemplary family and community service. The $2,000 scholarships are funded from apartment rental income at the Town's 1264 New York Avenue mixed use building in Huntington Station, purchased from Mr. Pius several years ago to house the Huntington Station Enrichment Center and a business incubator. The scholarship winners are Geraldine Cheung, a Northport High School graduate who will be attending Barnard College to study business and finance. Tereance Lynch, a Harborfields High School graduate who will be attending the University of Maryland and majoring in kinesiology. Geovanny Pedroza, a Harborfields High School graduate who will be attending Suffolk County Community College with plans for a career in architecture or interior design. Ioanna Mikalef, a Walt Whitman High School graduate who will be attending Hofstra University. Joseph Elijah Pardo, a graduate of St. John the Baptist High School who will be attending The University at Albany – SUNY and studying biology.


 


AVALON BAY PROPOSAL UPDATE


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 7/6/2010

 
For people considering attending the Town Board meeting tonight: Enactment of the Avalon Bay proposal is NOT on the agenda.

 


Berland Participates in Opening of CNG Facility


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/24/2010

In the photo (l-r): Mike Cecere, business development manager, and Peter Grace, senior vice president, sales and marketing, Clean Energy; Councilwoman Susan Berland; and Neal Sheehan and Matthew Laux, director and deputy director, respectively, Hunt
 
Kings Park, NY – Huntington Councilwoman Susan Berland took part this week in the grand opening of the state-of-the-art compressed natural gas fueling station that will be used by trucks collecting garbage in the Town. Built by the private company Clean Energy Corp. under contract with the Town of Smithtown, Huntington's longtime partner in solid waste disposal, the fueling station will be used by both Huntington Town vehicles and ones operated by private carters under contract with the Town – a total of 26 trucks. Starting this year, all trucks picking up garbage in Huntington were required to operate on compressed natural gas, a move will reduce the emission of nitrogen oxides and fine diesel particulates into Long Island's air by more than 264 tons over the next seven years. As part of the agreement approved by the Huntington Town Board last year, Clean Energy, which built the station at no cost to the Town, has guaranteed the price at which trucks can purchase compressed natural gas. The fueling station is located Clean Energy is the nation's largest supplier of natural gas for motor vehicle fuel with over one hundred and seventy fueling stations in California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, Washington and New York. Clean Energy is under contract to operate nine high volume CNG fueling stations for the New York State Clean Fueled Vehicles Program.


 


Huntington Marks 60th Anniversary of Korean War


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/17/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

In the photo: (l-r): Town Clerk Jo-Ann Raia, Councilman Mark Mayoka, Consul Byoung-sun Choi, Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, Councilwoman Susan Berland and Mario Buonpane, chairman, Veterans Advisory Board.
 
Melville, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and the members of the Town Council joined 400 guests at a breakfast sponsored by the Town's Veterans Advisory Committee to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the beginning of the Korean War. Sometimes called "The Forgotten War" because frequently it is overshadowed by World War II that preceded it and the Vietnam War that followed, the Korean War resulted in more than 33,700 Americans being killed in action and more than 8,000 listed as missing. The war, which began on June 25, 1950, included some of the most intense fighting ever experienced by American soldiers at places such as the Pusan Parameter, the Inchon Landing and the Chosin Reservoir. At the breakfast today, the War was remembered as central to preserving democracy throughout the World as the Cold War continued with Communist nations. "I came here to pay tribute to soldiers who risked their lives to safeguard freedom," Byoung-sun Choi, consul to the Korean Consulate General, told the audience. "The Korean government and I are truly grateful to Korean War Veterans." Supervisor Petrone, in welcoming the audience, spoke of the importance of remembering the War. His remarks were echoed by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, Councilwoman Susan Berland and Councilman Mark Mayoka. Councilwoman Glenda Jackson was unable to attend, but sent her best wishes. "The world owes you a tremendous debt of gratitude," Councilman Cuthbertson told the audience. Councilwoman Berland said, "It is important we pay homage to all Korean veterans…Our hope is that the day will come when we never have to commemorate the start of another war." Added Councilman Mayoka, "People who put themselves in harm's way preserve and protect our freedom and our way of life." Supervisor Petrone paid special tribute to Len Totora, a longtime, active member of the Town's Veterans Advisory Board who was instrumental in making the Korean War Memorial an integral part of Veteran's Plaza at Town Hall. A combat photographer in the Korean War, Totora passed away earlier this year. The keynote address was delivered by Daniel Wolfe, author of Cold Ground's Been My Bed: A Korean War Memoir. Wolfe spoke about his war experiences and read a passage from his book. "In order to forget, you have to know it – and we knew it," he told the audience.


 


Fact Sheet on Proposed Huntington Station Transit Oriented District and Avalon Bay’s Proposed Development


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/15/2010

 
Through discussions with the Town of Huntington, Avalon Bay has made significant changes to the proposal. The most significant change is a reduction in the number of proposed units from 530 to 490. This reduced the density to 18.5 units per acre. The revised plan calls for one less building than the original, a reduced number of parking spaces and an increased amount of open space in the development. Three-fourths of the units (368) will be rented or sold at market rate. Avalon Bay changed the mix of the 122 income-restricted units. Under the new proposal, eight percent of the units (39) will be set aside as affordable, nine percent (44) as workforce and eight percent (39) as moderate. For the rentals, affordable is defined as persons earning 50 percent of the median income; workforce is 80 percent of median income; moderate is 110 percent of median income. Estimated monthly rents for a one-bedroom unit would be $1,018 for an "affordable" one bedroom, $1,629 for a "workforce" one-bedroom and $1,961 for a "moderate" one-bedroom. Estimated sales prices for income restricted two-bedroom units would be $183,250 (affordable) and $275,000 (workforce). There are no "moderate" for-sale units. Avalon Bay has agreed to provide $2.25 million in benefits to the Huntington Station community in return for the rezoning, a substantial increase from their original proposal. Those benefits include: A $1.5 million donation to the Huntington School District. A $500,000 donation to the Town's Economic Development Corp., which will be used either to underwrite a portion of the costs of developing the EDC's proposed commercial building at the intersection of Northridge Street and New York Avenue or to fund another economic development project in Huntington Station. If requested by the Town's HART bus system, construction, at a cost estimated at $25,000, of a bus stop/enclosure at the Avalon Bay development where passengers, both from the development and from the community, can wait for pickup by a HART bus. A $75,000 donation to the Friends of the Huntington Train Station to enhance the entrance to the Huntington Train Station and improve pedestrian and traffic safety and to install bike racks or bike lockers at the station. A $75,000 donation to Huntington Country Farms for property improvements, including enhancing the fence along East Fifth Street. A $25,000 donation to the Family Service League. An additional $50,000 in donations to various community organizations and a commitment to sponsor the Andy Forsberg Memorial Lacrosse Tournament for five years. The Huntington School Board voted overwhelmingly to accept the $1.5 million from Avalon Bay. At its July 6, 2009 meeting, on a resolution sponsored by board member Richard McGrath, the School Board, by a 6-1 vote, entered into an agreement with Avalon Bay providing for the $1.5 million payment to the District. There is no requirement that Avalon Bay accept Section 8 vouchers in lieu of rent payments. Supervisor Frank Petrone notified Huntington School Board President Bill Dwyer of this fact in a June 14 letter. The final plans for the project have not been submitted, much less approved. When submitted, they will undergo the normal review process for all development submissions. While Avalon Bay has submitted artists' renderings of how they envision the project could look, they have not submitted any formal plans for review. When submitted, the plans will be subject to all restrictions in Town Code on such issues as building height. The proposed Transit Oriented District code limits buildings to three stories with a maximum height of 45 feet. The Transit Oriented District will allow construction of much-needed housing for both empty nesters and young persons just entering the workforce. According to the Long Island Index, Long Island has been producing significantly lower shares of multi-family units compared to other suburban community in the region: only 22% of all building permits issued on Long Island since 2000 have been for multi-family units, compared with 37% in the region excluding New York City. The Long Island Index notes that many of the problems associated with housing on Long Island—including its high cost and lack of rental units—can be traced to low rates of multi-family unit production to meet changing housing demands of young people and senior citizens.

 


Lighting the Way to Energy Efficiency


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/11/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

: Crew from Welsbach Electric replaces street lighting fixtures on Elwood Road in East Northport.
 
Huntington Town this week began the process of replacing more than 4,000 streetlights with energy-efficient fixtures that are estimated to cut the Town energy consumption for street lighting by as much as 50 percent. Welsbach Electric Corp., a contractor hired by the Town, this week started replacing 150-watt high-pressure sodium fixtures with 80-watt energy efficient induction fixtures. The $803,200 program to change 2,400 fixtures of varying wattages is funded with part of the Town's $1.725 million Energy Efficiency Block Grant under the federal American Reinvestment and Recovery Act. A separate, $555,667 federal ARRA grant obtained through the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, will be used to replace 1,754 250-watt sodium fixtures with 120-watt induction ones. The Town has 1,194 miles of roads containing street lighting. The Town spent $1.8 million on electricity for street lighting in 2009.


 


Berland Congratulates Students for Reading Achievements


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/11/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
East Northport, NY – Huntington Councilwoman Susan Berland recently congratulated a group of 30 Fifth Graders at the Commack School District's Burr Intermediate School for successfully completing required reading goals under a literacy program sponsored by Cablevision in partnership with the New York Knicks. In speaking to the students, Berland noted the importance reading plays in achieving life goals. She joined principal Charles Heppeler and teacher Sue Ohlinger in presenting certificates to the students.


 


Petrone, Cuthbertson Form Melville Business Partnership


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/11/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Melville, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Councilman Mark Cuthbertson announce formation of the Melville Business Partnership, in which Town officials and leaders from the business community will work together to foster Melville's continuing evolution as a corporate center and development as Long Island's Downtown. Supervisor Petrone and Councilman Cuthbertson envision Partnership members will work together on issues such as: -- advocating and promoting business development strategies to strengthen Melville as an employment center; -- modernizing zoning to enhance corporate development, including creation of a new office/employment zone that encourages and promotes better use of land values, improved site design and pedestrian linkage and shared site amenities; -- encouraging "town center" development that provides restaurants, retail and personal services within walking distance for employees -- exploring the economic and financial feasibility of establishing special use districts to address long-term infrastructure needs. "Melville is the epicenter of corporate office development on Long island and the Town's largest source of employment and tax revenue," Supervisor Petrone said. "Our economic future largely depends on how major stakeholders -- those with the knowledge, influence and respect in the business community – work together to nurture this resource." "Canon's recent groundbreaking for its Americas headquarters, on top of the relocation of Leviton's corporate headquarters and the expansion of Rubies' Costumes' headquarters, underscores Melville's potential as a corporate headquarters center," Councilman Cuthbertson said. "The Partnership's role will be to ensure that we do not lose the momentum those three corporate actions produced to drive the town's economic engine." Creation of the Partnership was announced at a joint meeting of the Commercial-Industrial Brokers Society and the Association for a Better Long Island, a developers' group. Supervisor Petrone and Councilman Cuthbertson said details of how the Partnership will be structured remain to be worked out, although they envision a major role for the Melville Chamber of Commerce. "To keep our business environment healthy, companies large and small are ready and eager to work side by with government through a partnership dedicated to eliminating anything that might clog the arteries of our economic life," said Melville Chamber President Michael DeLuise, "Supervisor Petrone and Councilman Cuthbertson should be commended for seizing the moment to create the public-private partnership that will address Melville's needs while encouraging growth. We look forward to working with them on the Partnership." Supervisor Petrone and Councilman Cuthbertson asked any members of the audience to contact them if they were interested in being part of the partnership.


 


Town Drops Consideration of Town Hall Move


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 6/11/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Town of Huntington today announced it is stopping efforts to consider moving Town Hall to the Jack Abrams Intermediate School, in response to the Huntington Union Free School District board's vote earlier this week not to pursue an exchange of the two properties. In a letter to School Board President Bill Dwyer, Supervisor Frank P. Petrone noted that the Town's consultant had completed its assessment of the feasibility of moving Town Hall to the Jack Abrams site. The consultant, H2M, concluded that such a move was feasible but would require extensive modification of the school building and cost an estimated $11 million. Supervisor Petrone included a copy of the report with his letter. Supervisor Petrone noted in the letter, "I want to make it very clear that your decision to abandon this idea will not in any way diminish or change the Town Board's continued commitment to revitalize Huntington Station," citing priority projects including the creation of a community garden at Gateway Park, stepped-up code enforcement, condemnation and demolition of the eyesore former automobile repair shop at 1000 New York Avenue and redevelopment of a parcel on Columbia Street at part of the Take Back the Blocks program. The letter added, "We are and will continue to be partners with the School district in ensuring the safety of the students at Jack Abrams Intermediate School. You have our commitment that we will stand together to continue the enhanced presence of the Suffolk County Police Department at JAI." The letter said a meeting would be scheduled with the police department for next month.

 


Dix Hills Water Voted Best on Long Island


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/28/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
It's official: The Dix Hills Water District has the best tasting water on Long Island. The Huntington Town-run district easily defeated the Westbury Water District, 32-23, in a blind taste test conducted at the May 24 meeting of the Long Island Water Conference, which has sponsored the competition for the past 25 years. Dix Hills and Westbury had won the right to represent their respective counties in taste tests earlier this month. "It is my pleasure to congratulate the Dix Hills Water District on their well-deserved selection as Long Island's best-tasting water," said Water Conference Chairman Richard Tobin. "This contest always provides us with an excellent opportunity to remind residents to conserve, protect and get involved to ensure that Long Island's drinking water remains clean, plentiful, and great-tasting as well." "We congratulate the judges for their refined and discriminating taste and thank them for their decision," Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone said. "We look forward to the state competition." The annual statewide competition, sponsored by the State Department of Health, is usually held at the end of summer, in conjunction with the New York State Fair. The Long Island Water Conference is an association of more than 50 public water suppliers dedicated to providing a safe and reliable supply of public drinking water for over 3 million people in the Nassau/Suffolk area. Its members maintain over 1,000 supply wells, 10,800 miles of water mains and nearly 79,000 fire hydrants across the Island, guarding against contamination and ensuring quality service for a region more populous than 20 states.

 


Planning Begins for Huntington Station Celebration


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/25/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

Supervisor Frank P. Petrone speaks to members of the committee organizing Huntington Station’s “Unity in the Community Day.”
 
Huntington Station, NY -- A spirited group of community leaders met last Saturday to begin planning for Huntington Station's "Unity in the Community Day" Oct. 2, 2010, including a parade, speeches, a carnival and other activities. Spurred by remarks from Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, the committee, chaired by Huntington Station Enrichment Center director Dolores Thompson and community activist Al White, discussed a possible parade route and activities at the end of the route that would continue throughout the day. The committee -- composed of representatives from community groups, businesses, local churches and elected officials -- also considered potential honorees and keynote speakers before forming subcommittees to explore issues such as food, music, safety, vendors and sponsors. Supervisor Petrone pledged the Town's full support for the event. "Unity in the Community Day" is an outgrowth of recommendations by the Huntington Station Action Coalition's Community Organization/Civic Group Development subcommittee. In the report it issued in March, the Action Coalition recommended development of a public awareness campaign to inform the public about community activities and to instill civic pride. The committee will hold its next meeting June 19.


 


Huntington Honors Scholar Athletes


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/18/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Huntington Town Board last night honored 20 scholar- athletes, two from each of the 10 high schools in the Town, as exemplifying outstanding academic and athletic achievement among the Town's secondary school students. The 20 seniors were recognized for their contributions to the community at a ceremony before the Town Board meeting. Supervisor Frank Petrone welcomed the students and their families to Town Hall. Then each Town Board Member had an opportunity to award plaques to the students and read brief biographies of each student's achievements in both their academic and sports careers. Supervisor Petrone and the Town Board established the Scholar-Athlete Program in the min-1990s to honor outstanding Huntington youth. The program is administered by the Town Department of Parks and Recreation; the winners were selected by their respective school districts. Reinwald's Bakery and Bon Bons Chocolatier donated refreshments for the Awards Ceremony The 2010 honorees are: Cold Spring Harbor High School: Liam Murray and Kristen Insardi; Commack High School: Kyle Kilmetis and Suzie Lee; Half Hollow Hills East High School: Maxx Meyer and Carly Emmer; Half Hollow Hills West High School: Nolan Gelman and Melissa Lewis; Harborfields High School: Eric McLean and Juliann Persico; Huntington High School: Jeremy Rhodes and Johanna Clifford; John Glenn High School: Joe Kohout and Kanaan Shah; Northport High School: Joe Cicio and Blair Ingraham; St. Anthony's High School: Timothy Wine and Caroline Lydon; and Walt Whitman High School: Jordan Stone and Arifa Zaidi.


 


Town Begins Process to Acquire 1000 New York Avenue


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/18/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington, NY – The Town Board yesterday took the first steps toward acquiring by condemnation 1000 New York Avenue in Huntington Station, so that the long-abandoned automobile repair shop that has become a community eyesore can be demolished quickly and a private developer for a mixed-use building can be sought. The action by the Board – setting a June 15 public hearing on the condemnation – follows unsuccessful efforts by the Town to get the owner of the property, Dish Realty, to proceed with the plan, for which the Town obtained a $1.17 million state Restore NY Communities grant last year. The owner was to use the grant to tear down the existing building and help finance the construction of the new retail-residential complex, whose cost is estimated at $3 million. "We have tried for some time to obtain commitments from the company that owns this property that it will go ahead with the plans it supported when the Town applied for the state grant, but we can wait no longer," Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. "Replacing this eyesore with a vibrant, mixed-use building adjacent to the pedestrian plaza the Town plans to construct is one of the focal points of our Huntington Station redevelopment." The plans call for a 10,800-square foot building with retail on the first floor and four apartments above. The Town would like to see completion of the project by the end of next year, with development of the plaza simultaneously. Construction of the mixed-use building was a major suggested initiative in the report the Huntington Station Action Coalition issued in March. The Restore NY grant was issued to the Town and can be used with a different developer. If the condemnation is approved, one plan would have the Town demolish the existing building while searching for a new developer. "I am sure we will have no trouble finding a developer willing to accept $1.17 million to help get a $3 million project built," Supervisor Petrone said. In other action, the Board: -- approved a settlement with 28 additional defendants in the lawsuit over contamination or threatened contamination of public water wells by the chemical methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). As one of 21 plaintiffs in the suit, the Town-operated Dix Hills Water District will receive just under $1.1 million from the $39.5 million settlement. The settlement was apportioned among the plaintiffs based on the number of wells and the extent of the contamination. In November 2009, the Board approved settlements with four minor defendants, totaling $12,596. -- approved amendments to the Town Code increasing the fines and penalties for those who establish and maintain substandard and illegal apartments. The changes, sponsored by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, are part of an overall stepped-up code enforcement effort. "These stepped-up code enforcement measures will help assure that all rental properties are documented and that they are safe and up to code," Councilman Cuthbertson said. -- took the first steps toward examining and recommending possible changes in the agreement for the operation of the Resource Recovery Plant in East Northport. The agreement with Covanta to operate the plant expires in October, 2012; Huntington and Smithtown, which share in the agreement, must notify Covanta by October 27, 2010 of their desire to renew the agreement for a five-year period. The resolutions authorized the hiring of Beveridge and Diamond as legal counsel and Henderson, Durham and Richardson as engineering consultant to review the current contract and suggest revisions. Payment for their services, estimated at a total of $750,000, is to come from interest accrued in a reserve account into which Huntington and Smithtown placed funds many years ago. -- approved a 90-day extension of the time to make a determination on the proposal to create a Transit Oriented Development District in Huntington Station and to act on an application by Avalon Bay Communities for a rezoning, allowing it to construct multifamily housing on property on East 5th Street in Huntington Station. The Town Board needs the additional time to weigh Avalon Bay's responses to comments and questions raised at the March 9 public hearing. -- approved the appropriation of up to $120,000 from the Town's Environmental Open space and Park Improvement Fund to create the community garden at Gateway Park in Huntington Station. "This appropriation will enable the Gateway Garden initiative to move forward as the plans for the community garden are finalized," said Councilwoman Glenda Jackson. "This will have a positive impact in the community and an integral measure towards the revitalization of Huntington Station." -- approved the issuing of $720,000 in bonds to construct a new refuse building at the Town's Boxer Court facility -- awarded franchise agreements to the Huntington YMCA and Long Island Kayak Academy and Outfitters to conduct instructional kayaking and sailing programs at selected Town beaches "The Town of Huntington has some of the most beautiful beaches and waterways on Long Island and I am happy that we will be sponsoring an instructional sailing and kayaking program once again this summer," Councilwoman Susan Berland said. "I encourage any residents looking to stay active this season to participate in these recreational programs. I also encourage our Town's avid kayakers to attend the 10th Annual Kayak For A Cause event on July 24th, 2010, which will be launching from Crab Meadow Beach and landing at Calf Pasture Beach in East Norwalk, Connecticut to raise money for a variety of charitable causes."

 


Northport Harbor Protection Committee Meets


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/17/2010

 
Huntington, NY – The Northport Harbor Protection Committee, formed last month by Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and Rep. Steve Israel as an outgrowth of a water infrastructure summit, held its organizational meeting last Friday and took the first steps toward creating a master plan to improve water quality in Northport Harbor. Co-chaired by Supervisor Petrone and Adrienne Esposito, executive director of Citizens Campaign for the Environment, the Committee includes elected officials from the Town and the incorporated villages of Northport and Asharoken. They will work in partnership with federal, state and county officials, local environmental groups and maritime experts to create a master plan that can identify, fund and schedule water quality improvement projects that will permit a closed beach in Northport Harbor to be reopened for swimming and the Northport Bay complex reopened for shell fishing. Supervisor Petrone said the committee is a similar to one that successfully addressed the same problems in Hempstead Harbor. "You need a group composed of the local jurisdiction that have responsibility for the harbors—the town and villages—and the layers of government who regulate those waters," he said. "Otherwise you get the piecemeal approach that has caused the current problem that has closed Northport to swimming and shell fishing for two summers in a row." At Friday's meeting, committee members heard updates on the factors contributing to the water quality issues in Northport Harbor and were asked to bring to the next meeting lists of suggested measures that might be incorporated into a coordinated plan to address the issues. The Committee emanated from a water infrastructure summit last month at the Centerport Yacht Club hosted by Rep. Israel, whose district includes the Northport/Centerport waterfront. Joining the Congressman were Federal and State agencies most directly responsible for protecting coastal waters: Judith Enck, USEPA regional administrator; Eugene Brickman, deputy chief planner for the Army Corps of Engineers; Karen Chytalo, director of marine resources at NYSDEC; Peter Scully, NYSDEC Regional Director; and Erick McCanless, director of technical services for the NYS Environmental Facilities Corporation. Town Council members, the village officials and representatives from Huntington's boating community also attended. At the April meeting, Congressman Israel said that the skills and resources needed to solve the problem would be brought to bear and pledged to help coordinate federal resources so the Committee could achieve maximum impact. Supervisor Petrone noted that the Town and the village of Northport are already engaged in a series of water quality improvement projects, including one managed by Cornell Cooperative Extension to identify and test water quality for bacterial loading at outflow pipes leading to Northport Harbor. Huntington also is involved in a study identifying outflow pipes operating without a permit that can be removed or forced to comply with state law. The Town has also completed a study of new technology for special inserts in storm water catch basins that can filter out organic and bacterial contaminants and will look to place such systems in outflow pipes adjacent to bathing beaches.


 


Huntington Station Action Coalition Holds Community Forum


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/17/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
The Huntington Station Action Coalition, a group of distinguished community leaders charged with identifying and implementing proposals to further Huntington Station's redevelopment, held the first of several planned community forums on Sunday, May 16, 2010, at St. Hugh of Lincoln Roman Catholic Church. Representatives from various Town departments, social services and other community agencies and the Suffolk County Police Department answered questions about the availability of programs of interest to Huntington Station residents. Also available were copies of the report the Action Coalition issued in March. The forum was run under the auspices of the Action Coalition's Human Services/Education subcommittee.


 


A Code Crackdown Finds Illegal Apartments at Two Sites


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/14/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY – Huntington Town inspectors, as part of the ongoing code enforcement crackdown, executed search warrants at two locations in Huntington Station Wednesday, discovering a total of eight dwelling units at what were supposed to be single family homes. The inspectors placed notices of hazardous conditions at each of the locations, 35 and 39 Railroad Street, noting that detached garages had illegally been converted into apartments and that basements had been illegally finished and were being used for sleeping purposes. A total of 11 summonses are being prepared to be issued to the owner of both properties for illegal second floor apartments, illegal conversion of garages into apartments, illegal finished basement used for sleeping purposes, lack of smoke or carbon monoxide detectors and interior dead-bolted doors at both locations, as well as an above-ground pool with no certificate of occupancy and unregistered vehicles at 39 Railroad and hazardous electrical wiring at 35 Railroad. The summonses will be returnable in Suffolk County District Court. "These actions serve additional notice of our resolve to continue cracking down on violations of Town codes, especially in Huntington Station," Supervisor Frank Petrone said. "That is why I formed a code enforcement task force last fall, and why the task force continues to address the violations of Town codes that affect the quality of life for all who live around these locations." Since it was formed last Fall as an outgrowth of the Huntington Station Action Coalition, the task force, which uses one-third of the Town's code enforcement officers, has conducted more than 650 investigations, served notice of 670 violations and issued (not counting yesterday's findings) 166 summonses. More than one-third of the investigations have looked into suspected illegal apartments. In measures sponsored by Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, the Town recently strengthened Town code to require landlords of Section 8 housing to register with the Town and submit to inspections. The Town also is in the process of increasing penalties for illegal or substandard apartments. "We are both creating the tools to address illegal and substandard housing more effectively and using those tools to crack down on violators," Councilman Cuthbertson said. "These actions will contribute to a safer, revitalized Huntington Station area." Councilman Cuthbertson is sponsoring a Code Enforcement Summit at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 25, at the Town's Big H Community Center. Town officials will update the community on code enforcement efforts and educate the community on how to help the Town identify potential violations and report them to the Town for possible action.

 


Dix Hills Water Named Tastiest in Suffolk


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/13/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

Supervisor Frank Petrone and Councilwoman Susan Berland celebrate with members of the Dix Hills Water District staff.
 
Dix Hills, NY – For the sixth time in 20 years, the Dix Hills Water District has been voted as having the Best Tasting Water in Suffolk County in a taste test conducted by the Long Island Water Conference. The Town-run district was notified of the distinction last week, following a blind taste test conducted at Farmingdale State College as part of the Water Conference's celebration of National Drinking Water Week. Dix Hills will now face off against the Westbury Water District next month to see who has the best tasting water on Long Island and earn the right to compete in the statewide competition. "The Dix Hills Water District is one of the few public water suppliers in the state that because of its diligent efforts to maintain a bacteria-free water supply and distribution system is exempt state disinfection requirements. That helps contribute to the water's great taste," Huntington supervisor Frank Petrone said. "We are gratified that the Long Island Water Conference's testers agree with us and look forward to taking on the Westbury Water District and proving that Dix Hills' water is the tastiest of all on Long Island and across the state." Dix Hills Water District water won the Suffolk County contest five times previously, in 1990, 1996, 2000, 2005 and 2008. The District went on to win the New York state contest in 2000. The Long Island Water Conference is an association of more than 50 public water suppliers dedicated to providing a safe and reliable supply of public drinking water for over 3 million people in the Nassau/Suffolk area. Its members maintain over 1,000 supply wells, 10,800 miles of water mains and nearly 79,000 fire hydrants across the Island, guarding against contamination and ensuring quality service for a region more populous than 20 states.


 


Huntington Breaks Ground on Breezy Park


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/7/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone, joined by members of the Town Council, officially broke ground today on the creation of Breezy Park, a $6.75 million project that will build three playing fields, a playground and other amenities at the site of a former commercial nursery. When completed in the Spring of 2011, Breezy Park will be a state-of-the-art facility for three sports – soccer, lacrosse and football – along the lines of the Veterans Park in East Northport and Manor Park in Huntington Station. The project is expected to be completed in time for the Spring 2011 sports seasons. "We are excited to be building a facility where children, youth and adults from all parts of the Town will be able to compete to the highest extent of their abilities. We also are proud that in creating this park, we are preserving from development environmentally sensitive land," Supervisor Petrone said. The Town, partnering with Suffolk County, acquired the 11-acre property for $4.1 million in July 2006, following a tireless effort by dedicated and caring residents and the Cold Spring Harbor Soccer Club to keep the parcel from being developed as a bus depot and repair yard for the South Huntington School District. The project's funding sources will include $1 million from the Town's Environmental Open Space and Park Improvement Fund (EOSPA), $1 million from other Town funds and the proceeds from $3.75 million in bonds the Town plans to issue over two years. The remaining funding is coming from a $1 million donation arranged by the Cold Spring Harbor Soccer Club from Joe and Nikki Gregory in memory of 13-year-old Brianna (Breezy) Titcomb, after whom the park is named. Breezy was a cherished member of the soccer club who was killed by a drunk driver while on vacation with her family in Texas in February 2005. Breezy's father, John, participated in the groundbreaking. The project will also include a memorial to Breezy. The property is the site of the former Mohlenhoff Nursery. The Mohlenhoff family started farming the land in 1936. the business into a florist and garden center known across the Island. The nursery closed in 2005. The property is environmentally sensitive. It backs up on Suffolk County's Froelich/Wicks Farm nature preserve. "The official opening of Breezy Park will mean so much to so many," said Councilman Mark Cuthbertson. "The open space acquisition adjacent to hundreds of acres of preserved land, the addition of several recreational playing fields that will give children from Cold Spring Harbor, Huntington Station and throughout Huntington the opportunity to come and play together and to pay tribute to a young lady that in her 13 years touched the lives of so many." "Today's groundbreaking is a triumph in the preservation of open space in the Town of Huntington," said Councilwoman Susan Berland. "Breezy Park will be home to three state of the art fields that our Town's athletes will enjoy for generations to come and it will be a fitting tribute to the legacy of Breezy Titcomb. I would like to thank the Town, the County and in particular, the Gregory family and the Cold Spring Harbor Soccer Club, for championing and funding this Park." Councilwoman Glenda Jackson added, "The players cannot say enough positive things on how much they enjoy playing on the new turf fields over at Manor Park in Huntington Station and Vets Park in East Northport. Adding new turf fields at Breezy Park will make even more of our athletes happy." Councilman Mark Mayoka said, "As a newly elected official, I am honored to be invited to such a memorable event. Breezy Park is a fantastic community event, generously donated by Joe and Nikki Gregory and should be celebrated in honor of of Brianna Titcomb. I look forward to sharing together in many future memories."


 


Day Labor Site to Close


Office of Councilman Frank P. Petrone

Article Date: 5/4/2010
Author: A.J. Carter

 
Huntington Station, NY – Huntington Supervisor Frank P. Petrone and the majority of the Town Council announced today that the Town will not renew the contract for operation of the Labor Ready Site on Depot Road and that the site will close when the contract expires in June. In a letter to the Family Service League, which for the past three years has run the site under contract with the Town, the Board members noted the Family Service League's "considerable efforts" to increase the site's usage by both those seeking employment and those seeking employees, and to provide pre-vocational, job placement, advocacy and referral services. But it also noted that largely as a result of the difficult economy, use of the site had been steadily declining, making it economically unfeasible to continue the site's operation. The letter noted, "We can no longer justify continuing funding for the site, especially since it appears no longer able to remedy the situation it was created to address: the public safety concern of persons soliciting work on public streets, creating dangerous conditions for potential employers, employees and passing motorists." The letter was signed by Supervisor Petrone and Council Members Mark Cuthbertson, Susan Berland and Glenda Jackson. Councilman Mark Mayoka declined to sign the letter. "It has become a